Xtend + WPH Question??

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by NCK MIZ, Sep 11, 2008.

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  1. NCK MIZ

    NCK MIZ New Member

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    I am using 15g Xtend and 15g WPH now during my workouts because of the recent research coming out and the WPH makes the drink taste disgusting. What do you guys add to your drinks to add additional flavor that has no calories in it? I was thinking Crystal Light, but that shit is so expensive.
     
  2. NCK MIZ

    NCK MIZ New Member

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    Here is a study done with WPH, it seems like it is the next big thing, it is supposed to be a lot better than WPI:




    The International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, examined the effects of supplementation with different proteins, namely hydrolyzed whey protein and casein, on muscle strength and body composition during a 10 week, supervised resistance training program. Importantly, this study was conducted on experienced male bodybuilders. In a double-blind protocol, these guys supplemented their normal diet with either whey hydrolysate or casein (1.5 grams per kilogram of body mass/day). What happened? Well, this well-controlled study indicated that:

    1. The whey hydrolysate group achieved a significantly greater gain in lean body mass than the casein group (5.0 vs. 0.8 kilograms). Also, the whey hydrolysate group lost significantly body fat while the casein group gained body fat (-1.5 vs. +0.2 kilograms).

    2. The whey hydrolysate group also achieved significantly greater improvements in muscle strength (measured by barbell bench press, squat and cable pull-down) compared to the casein group in each assessment of strength. Furthermore, when the strength changes were expressed relative to body weight, the whey group still achieved significantly greater improvements in strength compared to the casein group.

    In conclusion, it is becoming increasingly clear that high-quality whey protein hydrolysate is the best source of protein for serious strength-power athletes. The lean body mass gains gained in the whey hydrolysate group of 5 kilograms are truly nothing short of phenomenal in a trained athlete. Indeed, the superiority of whey protein hydrolysate may have something to do with its insulin boosting actions and its extremely rapid absorption and uptake.2 Interestingly enough, this study also demonstrated whey hydrolysate ingestion promoted fat loss; high-quality whey has ACE-inhibitory activy, which leads to inhibition of storage fat synthesis in fat tissue. This new research clearly helps to shed some light on why athletes using WPH products are achieving such rapid and significant muscle growth.

    1. Cribb PJ et al. Int J Sports Nutr Exerc Metab 2006;16(5).
    2. Manninen AH. Br J Sports Med. 2006 Sep 1;
     
  3. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2008 May 8:1-11.

    Plasma amino acid response after ingestion of different whey protein fractions.

    Farnfield MM, Trenerry C, Carey KA, Cameron-Smith D.

    School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.

    Background and objectives The digestion rate of proteins and subsequent absorption of amino acids can independently modulate protein metabolism. The objective of the present study was to examine the blood amino acid response to whey protein isolate (WPI), beta-lactoglobulin-enriched WPI, hydrolysed WPI and a flavour-identical control. Methods Eight healthy adults (four female, four male) were recruited (mean+/-standard error of the mean: age, 27.0+/-0.76 years; body mass index, 23.2+/-0.8 kg/cm(2)) and after an overnight fast consumed 500 ml of each drink, each containing 25g protein, in a cross-over design. Blood was taken at rest and then every 15 min for 2 h post ingestion. Results Ingesting the beta-lactoglobulin-enriched WPI drink resulted in significantly greater plasma leucine concentrations at 45-120 min and significantly greater branched-chain amino acid concentrations at 60-105 min post ingestion compared with hydrolysed WPI. No differences were observed between WPI and beta-lactoglobulin-enriched WPI, and all protein drinks resulted in elevated blood amino acids compared with flavour-identical control. Conclusions In conclusion, whole proteins resulted in a more rapid absorption of leucine and branched-chain amino acid into the blood compared with the hydrolysed molecular form of whey protein.

    PMID: 18608553
     
  4. NCK MIZ

    NCK MIZ New Member

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    are you trying to tell me that all the research coming out on WPH is not true, because I have seen tons of it; here is another one,

    Dr. Kaastra and co-workers determined the extent to which the combined ingestion of high-glycemic carbs and a protein hydrolysate (rich in small peptides), with or without additional free leucine, can increase insulin levels during post-exercise recovery.

    Fourteen male athletes were subjected to three randomized crossover trials in which they performed 2 h of exercise. Thereafter, subjects were studied for 3.5 h during which they ingested carbs only, carbs + protein hydrolysate, or carbs + protein hydrolysate + free leucine in a double-blind fashion. The results revealed that blood insulin responses were 108% and 190% greater in the carbs + protein hydrolysate and carbs + protein hydrolysate + leucine trial, respectively, compared with 24 25 the carbs only trial. This study also indicates that addition of free phenylalanine, as applied in earlier studies, is not necessary to obtain such high post-exercise insulin responses.

    Kasatra B, et al. Effects of increasing insulin secretion on acute post-exercise blood glucose disposal. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):268-75.
     
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