WRC and Le Mans questions?

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by JazzHound, Dec 12, 2002.

  1. JazzHound

    JazzHound Guest

    WRC: They must race at night given the huge lights they have on some setup, but on coarses like Pikes Peak or similar mountainous coarses where the margin for error is so little isn't it dangerous for them to race nights? One could flip off the mountain side and perish..

    Le Mans: How many are there? I know th ere is the 24 Hour Le Mans, then the ALMS. What's the difference and do these both race 24 hours nonstop consecutive? One driver or 2 or how many alternate? Do the television station broadcast these races in it's entirety?

    :eek: Lots of question to swallow, thanks for anyone who attemps them.
     
  2. 12xalt

    12xalt petrolsexual

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    Of course it's dangerous for them to rally at night. They do it anyway. Can flip off the side of a mountain during the day too.

    My dad only co drove on some national events when I was a kid, but some of the canadian rallies they ran in BC at night freaked him out. There was one that he was glad they ran at night, said if he could have seen those drop offs during the day he would have gotten out of the car at the end of the first stage and not gotten back in.
     
  3. Otto

    Otto Who the hell do you think I am!?!?!?!

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    le mans, for the 12 and 24 hr races there are usually two(three maybe) drivers and these switch, every couple of hours or so. And some stations will show the Lemans races in its entirety. The ALMS races are usually standard races and dont last very long, a few hours.
     
  4. JazzHound

    JazzHound Guest

    Do they race the 24 hours Le Mans every year? Do fans camp out there watching them ? Jeese! Where is it held, in France ?

    Give me a FAQ on Le Mans 24 hours please!
     
  5. Otto

    Otto Who the hell do you think I am!?!?!?!

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    www.lemans.org
    is the official site, its in france
    there is the petit le mans here in the US, in Georgia. same basic layout, most people just camp out for the race
     
  6. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    Well, any form of motorsport is dangerous, no matter the time of day. Night racing for the WRC is just as dangerous as during the daytime. Pike's Peak is dangerous in the daytime, so at night its even more dangerous.



    As far as Le Mans, the ACO (French "Automobile Club of the West") is the organisation that runs the 24 Hours of Le Mans, including its car classifications. The ALMS (American Le Mans Series) directly copies the rule book from the ACO and uses it for their races (12 of Sebring, 10 of Petite Le Mans, and the shorter ALMS races)

    The 24 at Daytona is run under the Grand-Am racing association, so the car classifications and rules are different. Most of the big manufacturer cars in Le Mans like the Audi would be illegal in Grand-Am competition unless they were to make several changes to the car including a larger roll-hoop structure.

    As far as how long a driver can run, no driver can run for more than 3 hours straight, and no more than 4 hours in any 6 hour period. So for the 24 hour race, teams typically employ 3 drivers for each car. A few will use 4 drivers.

    The 24 Hours of Le Mans is a stand alone race. There are no points awarded for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc that go toward a season championship. So when you go, you go to win, or go home.

    The ALMS on the other hand is a series of races that have points counted towards a season championship. Points are award on how many laps a driver drivers, wins, podiums, finishes, etc.


    Any other questions?
     
  7. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    The 24 Hours of Le Mans has been held every year except during war-time since 1923. This past one was the 70th running of it.

    Over the weekend, the estimated crowd is over 225,000 people around the track. At 8.4 miles in length, there is ALOT of track to watch.

    Its held at the Le Sarthe Circuit (temporary street circuit) in Le Sarthe, France. It also uses part of the Bugatti Raceway, a permenant race track.
     
  8. JazzHound

    JazzHound Guest

    Is Le Mans 24 Hour televised? I'd love to watch it if it were. So if a car is damaged for whatever reason, do they forfeit the race or can they be allowed to fix it? In the case where the car is fubar do they use a backup car?

    Too awesome.
     
  9. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    The 24 of Le Mans is broadcast globally to many nations. Here in the states, Speed Channel use to carry all 24. This year it was cut to 14 hours of coverage.

    As far as fixing a car. You can fix anything but the engine block and chassis if the car is in the pit or garage. Once its on the course, it can only be fixed by the driver using whats in the car.

    I.E. a teammate or mechanic cannont bring an extra battery or tools to fix something on a car thats outside of the pit-lane.


    Audi have done many complete rear end changes in less than 5 minutes, including an entire new transmission, rear suspension, everything.
     
  10. elysium

    elysium Guest

    Audi cheats with their big-budget modular design. :big grin:
     
  11. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    Well, Audi just further proved the theory that the more money you throw at it, the better you do.

    This was the norm until Toyota stepped up with their GT-One which was a major underacheiver and a disappointment. The money Toyota threw at the car to win Le Mans only to have it fail on every attempt.


    Audi has raised the bar for sportscar racing. Many of the things they did all the teams are doing now. So in a way Audi has made sportscar racing much better.

    Where before once a car had minor damage it had to be retired, it can now be very quickly repaired and sent back on its way. Retirement lists are getting smaller and smaller and its making the racing better, IMO.
     
  12. elysium

    elysium Guest

    Agreed. Although, looking at non-LMP cars, it seems some cars like Ferrari's and Saleen's still often retire due to mechanical failures. This really pisses me off considering those two brands are the most exotic (eye-pleasing) non-LMP contenders.
     
  13. vudoodoodoo

    vudoodoodoo Guest

    I saw a pic of a WRX almost falling off the cliff on the way up Pikes Peak. The pic was in SCC. Some guys had to help push it away from the edge.
    WRC is so bad ass. :big grin:
     
  14. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    Word of note:

    Pike's Peak is not associated with the FiA World Rally Championship..... ;)
     
  15. Otto

    Otto Who the hell do you think I am!?!?!?!

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    hill climbs are a whole different can of worms

    i love watching the Semi-trucks do Pikes Peak, its incredible
     
  16. autoracer1

    autoracer1 Rallyx postponed :wtc: Next one May 10.

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    In a aussie car mag I have, it shows some guy on a quad (like a trike but 4 wheels u know?) with a turbo hayabusa motor, cutting fucking incredible times.

    Regarding the BC rallies at night... I can only imagine.. but Ill see them next year. Most of the TSD rallies are run at night, on logging roads. They are through mountains. Not many accidents, and everyone buys adequate lighting. Some side lights, big illuminating ones and then the pen ones that are really bright but only for a small bit.
     
  17. Macka1972

    Macka1972 New Member

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    The LeMans circuit is 8.4 miles in length, and goes thru the French countryside.

    There is a very long (~3 mi.) straight (Mulsanne Straight) that is a very famous piece of straightaway.

    Through 1983, cars were hitting speeds of 240mph+ on this straight. The record I believe is 247mph, set by a Porsche 917.

    After that time 2 chicanes were installed to keep the speeds down.

    Presently cars still hit upwards of 215mph on various sections of the track.
     
  18. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    The run from the Bugatti circuit until the first chicane on Mulsanne is the fastest part of the circuit now. Its slightly downhil most of the way so cars pick up the most speed.

    But also now the run from the Mulsanne corner down to Indy is equally as fast.
     
  19. Buck-O

    Buck-O Guest

    This is probibly my favoritest part of the track, i love the speed the cars carry down through Indy.
     
  20. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    That is unless your driving a Mercedes Benz CLK-GTR..... :eek3:
     
  21. matt_c

    matt_c Guest

    another rally question but off-topic from original question...

    why does it appear they have such skinny tires? is that just me? i would think they would want wider tires to get maximum traction. :dunno:
     
  22. matt_c

    matt_c Guest

    of course in rally maximum traction isn't really something that can be had...but still i thought wider tires would be better
     
  23. ae86andkp61

    ae86andkp61 Guest

    It really depends on the surface....many rally events are held on the type of surface where there is some small loose particles on top (dirt, pea gravel, loose snow, whatever...) and the best traction available is a little bit below the surface. A narrower tire can reach the hard area that offers traction better than a wide tire. If you look at the tires WRC cars run in the snow Sweden, you will see the most extreme narrow tires in modern rallying...in part becuase they can use studs...the narrow studded tires literally cut through the snow to the hard traction below.

    In gravel, really wide tires, especially wide tires with very closed tread can cause an unsettling floaty feel....not what you want to have at 85mph, 100mph, 120mph on a single-lane gravel road...:big grin:

    It is a balancing act...but you are right, many rally cars run tires that seem a little narrow for their power output if you are more used to streetcars or pavement racing.
     
  24. Guido The Penguin

    Guido The Penguin Hi, I'm here for the gang bang.

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    Yeah, ae86 hit it exactly. The narrower tires bite into the road better cause they put more weight of the car in a smaller spot.


    In normal road racing on paved roads, wider is better. The more tire surface you can put on the road surface, the better. This is true because the gripping part of a paved road is on the top of it.


    However on dirt roads this is not the case. The loose dirt on top offers no grip. However the harder dirt packed down into the road offers grip, and tire engineers and teams use tires that will get the tires down to this harder, "grippier" surface.

    This is why before the WRC started reversing the order of cars on the road from 15th to first place, drivers would intentionally slow down on the course in order to keep from being the first car out the next day. The first car would sweep the loose dirt off the road leaving the good stuff behind.
     

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