A&P Would i need a medium format cam...

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by dmora, May 5, 2004.

  1. dmora

    dmora Guest

    if i wanted to make a photo/print about 4' tall and 3' wide?
     
  2. you'd probably want a large format camera....
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    I second the large format. At least a 4x5 camera. The good news is that you can pick up a 4x5 camera pretty cheap from a used camera store. The bad news is that unless you've ever used one, they are like no other camera you've ever seen. A studio 4x5 camera works like this:

    You compose and focus the image by moving the bellows that holds the lens forward and backward with your head under a black cloth. The image is upside down on the ground glass at the rear of the camera which makes composition a bit awkward. Next you slide in the film holder, which means you now cannot "see" the image. You then cock the shutter, which is on the lens, double check the f/stop because it's easy to move when you cock the shutter, double check to see if your subject has moved, which isn't easy because you can't see the ground glass anymore and fire away. Then you do it all over again with a new piece of film in the film holder. Oh, and you'll need a totally dark room or a changing bag to load your film.

    If you want to go larger, you can shoot with an 8x10" camera. These are the cameras that Playboy uses to shoot the centerfolds.
     
  4. dmora

    dmora Guest

    :uh: :wtc:
     
  5. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

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    in theory, you could print that size from any camera, you'd just have alot of grain in your final print....

    what are you shooting? what kind of medium camera were you thinking about? 6x4.5? 6x6? 6x7? 6x9?

    also, in a pinch, 2 big thick jackets with zippers can be used to reload film...

    jcolman, you forgot to mention pulling the darkslide, remembering to put it back in after exposure (you'd be suprised how many of the freshmen/sophmore students i assisted in school would forget that step... then again, maybe you would't be suprised :big grin:) and remembering to flip it so you don't expose a piece of film twice
     
  6. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    You're absolutly right. However, this is one mistake that I've never made because I learned my lesson about film handling a long time ago.

    Many years ago, fresh out of photography school, I was working for the city planner of Glenwood Springs, Colo. He had contracted with the town of Aspen, Colo. to prepare some sort of plan and he needed an overview photo of the town. Lacking the funds to rent an airplane for an aerial shot, we decided to hike to the top of a mountain near the ski area and shoot some photos from atop the summit. Since this was in the summer, the ski lifts wern't running so we spent about two-three hours hiking up the mountain. At the top, I loaded my 35mm camera with a roll of film and started shooting shots of the town. I shot the whole roll and put my camera back in my camera bag. We hiked back down the mountain, drove back to Glenwood Springs, and went back to his office where I proceeded to unload the film. When I started to rewind the film, I noticed that it seemed to come off the take-up spool up pretty quickly. My heart sank and I informed my boss that we may have a problem. We developed the film anyway and sure enough....it was entirely blank! When I had loaded the film on top of the mountain, it failed to catch on the take up spool so everytime I advanced the film, the film stayed in the cannister.

    The next day I made the same hike back up the mountain, by myself this time as my boss wasn't eager to hike the moutain a second time, and finished the job.

    To this day, I have always double checked to make sure the film is on the take up spool, or the dark slide in inserted in a view camera, or the film is threaded correctly in the gate of a motion picture camera. I'm just thankful that I was able to reshoot the assignment and my little error didn't occur during a one time event.
     

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