Workouts with broken wrist?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by PepsiBlue, Nov 5, 2009.

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  1. PepsiBlue

    PepsiBlue OT Supporter

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    I have a cast on my left hand midway up my forearm. Any thoughts of how I can still work biceps or shoulders without aggravating it?
     
  2. PepsiBlue

    PepsiBlue OT Supporter

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    sounds good, kinda figured
     
  3. Request.

    Request. OT Supporter

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    Work the opposite arm. It keeps the arm in the cast from atrophying.

    It sounds crazy but it works. It's all based on reciprocal inhibition.
     
  4. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    Dude, reciprocal inhibition refers to the relaxation or inhibition of the antagonist muscle when the agonist contracts.

    In terms of neural strength, doing a movement with one arm will have a training effect neurally on the opposite limb, but the prevention of atrophy is another thing altogether.

    Some people suggest isometrics whilst in casting etc. It's probably best to check with your doctor / physio in regards to the best treatment to prevent muscle atrophy.
     
  5. Request.

    Request. OT Supporter

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    Reciprocal inhibition still applies. I'm basing this on my neuro background.

    If you want to get into a pissing contest over it I can show you the research behind it.

    Prevention of atrophy is key and it's all based on mirror image exercises.

    I wouldn't suggest isometrics yet. If you want to get it rehabbed there are several options including muscle stim.
     
  6. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    Yep, I'm interested, show me the research.
     
  7. Request.

    Request. OT Supporter

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    Here's one example of what I'm talking about.

    I'm referring to corticospinal tracts working in conjunction with one another in gait.

    Corticospinal inhibition of transmission in propriospinal-like neurones during human walking.

    Iglesias C, Nielsen JB, Marchand-Pauvert V.
    U731 INSERM, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47, bd de l'Hôpital, F-75013 Paris cedex 13, France.
    It is crucial for human walking that muscles acting at different joints are optimally coordinated in relation to each other. This is ensured by interaction between spinal neuronal networks, sensory feedback and supraspinal control. Here we investigated the cortical control of spinal excitation from ankle dorsiflexor afferents to quadriceps motoneurones mediated by propriospinal-like interneurones. During walking and tonic contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and knee extensors while standing [at matched electromyography (EMG) levels], the effect of common peroneal nerve (CPN) stimulation on quadriceps motoneurones was tested by assessing averaged and rectified EMG activity, H-reflexes [evoked by femoral nerve (FN) stimulation] and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The biphasic EMG facilitation (CPQ-reflex) produced by isolated CPN stimulation was enhanced during walking, and when CPN stimulation was combined with FN or TMS, the resulting H-reflexes and MEPs were inhibited. The CPQ-reflex was also depressed when CPN stimulation was combined with subthreshold TMS. The peripheral (in CPN and FN) and corticospinal volleys may activate inhibitory non-reciprocal group I interneurones, masking spinal excitations to quadriceps motoneurones mediated by propriospinal-like interneurones. It is proposed that the enhanced CPQ-reflex produced by isolated CPN stimulation during walking cannot be fully explained by an increase in corticospinal and peripheral inputs, but is more likely caused by central facilitation of the propriospinal-like interneurones from other sources. The corticospinal control of non-reciprocal group I interneurones may be of importance for reducing reflex activity between ankle dorsiflexors and quadriceps during walking when not functionally relevant.

    We're making the same point. It's all functinal neurology.

    Here's another. If you activate aflexor in one arm, you're activating an extensor in the other.

    Lack of modulation of Ib inhibition during antagonist contraction in spasticity.

    Morita H, Shindo M, Momoi H, Yanagawa S, Ikeda S, Yanagisawa N.
    Department of Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Japan. [email protected]
    OBJECTIVE: To examine the modulation of non-reciprocal group I (Ib) inhibition during tonic contraction of antagonist muscles in patients with spasticity vs normal subjects. METHODS: The authors studied 10 patients with spastic paraplegia due to cervical compression myelopathy and 16 age-matched normal subjects. Ib inhibition to soleus motoneurons was recorded as the change in size of the H-reflex of the soleus, evoked by conditioning stimulus to the nerve innervating the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The extent of inhibition was studied at rest and during tonic contraction of the pretibial muscles of variable strength. RESULTS: In the resting state, the extent of inhibition in the patients did not differ from normal controls. During antagonist contraction, the extent of inhibition increased both in the normal subjects and patients. The increment was smaller in the patients, especially in those with severe spastic gait. The smaller increment in the inhibition was correlated with the time required to walk 10 m in the patients. CONCLUSION: The authors observed a lack of modulation of Ib inhibition during tonic antagonist contraction in patients with spasticity, especially those with gait disturbance. Disturbed central modulation of non-reciprocal (Ib) interneurons may be responsible for spasticity.


    I'm not trying to be a dick here. I just respectfully and professionally disagree with you.

    We're arguing the same point, but with different methods of training a weak muscle.
     
  8. Hood Moses

    Hood Moses I part the Black Seas...

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    Heres what I did when I broke my wrist/hand/arm.

    I squatted 3x a week, low(M) medium(W) and high(F) volume. If I could I had someone hold the bar on my shoulders if possible.
    I did DB bench flat/inc(M) with my good hand. I did pec deck too, just cause it didnt hurt.
    DB Mil same(W)
    Suitcase DL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_OOHntPi6c(F) + other leg shit

    then 1 Arm Rows/Pulldowns (M&W)
    curls (M&F)
    tri extensions (M&W)

    Probably took me a good 2-3 months to get back to where I was after my cast came off.
     
  9. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    I fail to see how those papers prove your point, did you even read them or were they the first results on pubmed you came across?
     
  10. Request.

    Request. OT Supporter

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    Ok, can you see that based on gait, certain muscles are activated and others are inhibited bilaterally?

    If you're activating the quad in your left leg, you're activating the hamstring in the right for example.

    If you're inhibiting the quad in the right, you're inhibiting the hamstring in the left.

    This applies for the upper extremity as well.

    The articles above site inhibition and activation of musculature in gait.

    The body doesn't stop this process just because you're injured. It continues to inhibit and activate musculature across the midline.

    That said, if you injure a your right wrist, you should exercise the left to activate those muscle groups thus preventing atrophy.


    If it helps my validity any, I just took PT boards on this very subject and scored well.
     
  11. grampositivecocci

    grampositivecocci New Member

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    That's because there are CPGs that modulate walking because its a rhythmic pattern. Comparing gait to an upper limb resistance exercise is a pretty large step.

    I'm not saying you're wrong, but you haven't produced evidence to support your argument that reciprocal inhibition will prevent muscle atrophy.

    Either way he should be using his good side, but so far you haven't demosntrated that its to prevent atrophy via reciprocal inhibition. If you can produce some actual evidence to support your argument I am actually quite interested.
     
  12. miek

    miek New Member

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    Don't even bother working out that arm at all, let that shit rest. I had a cast on my right hand for 13 months... trust me, it's not fun. That's just something you don't want to fuck around with.

    You'll even out very fast after it comes off and you start lifting again, don't worry.
     
  13. watagatapitusberry

    watagatapitusberry OT Supporter

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    monument to man's arrogance
    i think he's arguing that because the LMN is still being activated, muscle atrophy will be minimal, regardless of the descending pathways used to modulate movement
     
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