A&P With many many professionals shooting today...

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by coughlin's law, Apr 8, 2008.

  1. How does one distinguish himself from the rest? Is it what he sees and captures, not entirely based on his equipment but rather his mind? I often wonder, if I'm wasting my time just being a hobbyist. I don't look to put anyone out of business or become a rival...

    I find it hard to become professional and taken seriously when you don't have all the money for flashes and lenses. But ambition can go far right?
     
  2. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    some of the best photographers in the universe have used the cheapest, shittiest equipment.

    In some cases, feeling like you 'need' more equipment to shoot better photographs is a crutch, and an excuse for poor photography... (man, if only I had the 50mm 1.4 instead of this stupid 1.8.. that should woulda been awesome!)

    It's 100% about developing your own style and expressing your vision. If you go and look at some of the best photographers, you'll quickly see that you can pick one of their photos out of a pile of random work. Their style and vision comes through in every photograph, setting them apart from everyone else.

    of course all of this is worthless if you don't understand the basics of the medium you're working with.
     
  3. Spurious

    Spurious New Member

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    Amen brudder.
     
  4. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    thats a very good question to ask yourself, and ultimately only you can answer it.
     
  5. 3-THREE-7

    3-THREE-7 New Member

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    Your subject is almost as important as well imo. My goal is to concentrate on one subject, where there is little creative knowledge needed. Quality clear shots, advertised to the right client can be very rewarding.

    Before digital photography was around. There was a guy (can't remember his name), who had a special panoramic camera. His subject was large groups of people, ie US Airforce. He then took his prints to the specific people who were in the photo(s), and asked if they wanted to purchase a copy. 9 out of 10 times the photo sold. Now, these images are antiques, and worth a hell of a lot of money. However, at the time this guy was just making a living, and enjoying his hobby.

    Another guy sold a photo to my father. It was a photo of his house, from the air, taken from a personal aircraft.

    My point is. It's not just the creative mind that sells photos. Find your neich market, and exploit it.
     
  6. turbodude

    turbodude Just a photographer OT Supporter

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    Good marketing is how you set yourself a part. RELIABILITY is a huge one as well.
     
  7. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    I've tried to get away from the term "professional photographer".

    Is somebody who does accounting for a living a "professional accountant?"

    I prefer these days to say that "photography is my profession" or "I take pictures for a living".

    Saying "I'm a professional photographer" these days seems to come off as "I think I'm hot shit".
     
  8. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Good service (part of reliability) and value (doesn't mean cheap) have been the cornerstone of my business model. I try to treat every client as if they're my own client.

    I'm sure I'm not unique in my approach.

    Ohhh yeah, own = only. Typo.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2008
  9. FindersKeepers

    FindersKeepers New Member

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    I concur with the above.

    The approach doesn't have to be unique but how you sell yourself to people is what really sets you from others. You can be one of those "yeah well, i'll do this this and this" people that makes clients going :ugh:

    While Im one of those, "would you like this that and that, No? How about we switch this to that" people...

    Just as an example that I've learned from my day job in sales - Even in the most intense situations you have to lead them by hand, while making them think they are in control, while you KNOW you are in control and you get them all :coold: and :wavey: for next time.

    it tends to work better then having that oh im a hoity toity professional its my way or no way

    another one of those what I learned in dayjob I apply to doing shoots,
    I in no way claim to be a pro at what I do, I dont even TRY to be a pro, and I definately dont even say im a pro to people, they ask my opinions, and or I get a request to do a shoot, and if I do it right, they ask me back and spread the word, and word might spread slowly but it spreads

    if I do shitty they dont ask me back, they will tell people that I did a shitty job, and shitty news gets around faster than good news.
     
  10. ///Mik3

    ///Mik3 New Member

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    Lots of good points brought up so far, and i agree w/ most of them.

    Another thing that's important is consistency. If you show a client a great portfolio, you need to be able to deliver a shot(s) of the same caliber, because they're hiring you for the vision/style they saw in your portfolio (atleast the good clients are) and that's what they expect to get.
     

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