Wiring of a new office and Gigabit/s

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by 5Gen_Prelude, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    So we plan to move in a few months and we'll have to wire from scratch again. The first time we did it we used hubs - and then had to undo all of that when the LAN was so slow. This time around we're doing all home runs to the server area. Any tips and tricks you would suggest? Also be running phone lines at the same time. I thought of running 3-4 Cat5 cables to each station (about 10 outside of the server room).

    Also, how about GB/s? Has anyone switched from 100 BaseT? What were the results? Bout the same, marginal, holy shit how did we live with 100 BaseT?!?
     
  2. col_panic

    col_panic calm like a bomb Moderator

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    rather than doing all home runs i would just do fiber from the closets to the server area and 100Mb from the switchs to the workstations. we only use Gb for the backbone and switch closet runs
     
  3. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Closets? No, much smaller scale :big grin: A couple of switches handle all of our computing needs. I'm just trying to forcast what we need rather than buying what we require right now.
     
  4. samm

    samm Next in Line

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    I have only noticed drastic increases in performance on gigabit ethernet when turning on jumbo frames between nodes in a cluster. I've seen actual throughput reach close to 900Mb/s when running heavy data dependent MPI programs.

    Our workstations also have gigabit but I really don't notice it much because I only use it to code and check email.
     
  5. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    I wish we had gigabit switches. :( As much traffic as we get on our LAN, we could seriously benefit from gigabit. Students download software (VS.NET, IBM Websphere, etc) constantly from our download servers and it really boggs things down. All of our newer servers and about every lab machine has a gigabit NIC. The only issue is we'd need about 8 new Cisco gigabit switches. :sad2:

    5gen, I personally don't know enough to give you good advice. My only words would be to have fun. :cool:
     
  6. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    Definately do multiple runs to all the drops. That is one of the main regets we had at my previous job. We ended up with 30 3Com workgroup switches scattered all over the place to feed new machines we were adding. :greddy: It was a PITA to troubleshoot.
     
  7. col_panic

    col_panic calm like a bomb Moderator

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    some bonehead decided that we were going to charge by port and only have one drop per workstation, even for IT :rant2:

    now of course, they realize that one drop is not sufficient, and they have to have extra lines run or we cannot use multiple workstations. i already "borrowed" a neighboring line for a test box, but such short-sighted planning really irks me.
     
  8. diranged

    diranged New Member

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    No one system needs more than 100MBIT usually. Take 5-10 100MBIT SWITCHES (NOT HUBS) and mount them around the office. From there wire Cat6 (so that you dont have to wire again -- this will let you switch to GigE at some point) from those "leaf" switches to your individual computers. Then run Cat6 from the "leaf" switches back to a nice cheap Nortel Networks 48-Port 1U GigE "Core" Switch.
     
  9. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Is there anything I should know about Gigabyte wire/wiring that's different from 100?
     
  10. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    That is true, but we run a lot of database stuff and a lot of it is access base which we can't move from - at least not entirely. It's a pig. I saw huge improvements from 10->100 which is why I was wondering if 100->1000 would also net very good results. I may just run a gigabyte backbone between the server and a couple of machines that are banging away at the server - at least that would decrease traffic for the 100's
     
  11. diranged

    diranged New Member

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    Gig-E Wiring = Cat5E or Cat6. Cat5E does NOT work well for long distances (ie, over 10 ft). Cat6 is VERY reliable and worth the extra money. The Cat6 and Cat5E wires differ from Cat5 because of the shielding as well as the fact that all 4 pairs of wires are used.

    If you have any major servers that use alot of bandwidth, I'd put them on the back-bone "core" Gig-E switch and make all of their "clients" 100Mbit.
     

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