wired + wireless home network

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Grifter, May 29, 2005.

  1. Grifter

    Grifter Silver Member

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    i have a linksys wired router and i wanna get a wireless router for my laptop and psp but i want to keep my desktops wired
    i dont want the wireless network to access the wired one

    can i go modem-> wired router -> wireless router
    or will i need a switch in between the routers?
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2005
  2. DAN513

    DAN513 OT Supporter

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    Why not get a wireless access point instead of another router?
     
  3. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    I have 2 routers... one wireless, and one wired configured in much the same way you list. I do this for security reasons. It allows me to have a more lax security policy for my wired machines, and setup a much more robust scheme for wireless clients.

    As to answer DAN513, a wireless access point is often more expensive than a wireless router -- believe it or not.

    As an alternative, you can configure most SOHO wireless routers to act strictly as an access point. To do so, configure the router to *NOT* handle DHCP. Then use a crossover cable to connect the two routers via normal "switch" ports. Leave the WAN port disconnected. The wireless router will then act as an access point to the network, with DHCP leases being handed out by the wired gateway.
     
  4. Grifter

    Grifter Silver Member

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    bestbuy has linksys 802.11b router for $5 after rebates today and tomorrow
    i just picked one up


    so your one of your wired router ports goes to the wireless internet port?
    are there any issues with your network or internet?
    and how do u access your routers if they are both 192.168.1.1?

    if i do it that way the two networks wont be able to see each other?
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2005
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    No, I have the switches connected via a crossover cable. The WAN port on the wireless router is not being used. However, you could connect the WAN port of the wireless router to the wired router, and leave DHCP turned on in the wireless router.

    nope. Works great.
    They're not. My network doesn't even use 192.168.x.x... But if you want to still use that, you would leave your wired router configured as 192.168.1.1 and then when you log into your wireless router to disable DHCP, set the router's IP to 192.168.1.2. Then each have their own IP. Actually, I change BOTH the wireless and wired router's IPs because my modem has 192.168.1.1, and this allows me to access all three devices.
    Incorrect. If you have it on a crossover between the two ports, then it is still ONE network. You simply have added flexibility to have seperate security policies for wired and wireless clients. If you connect the WAN port of the wireless router to the wired router, then your wireless clients will be isolated. In this configuration, wireless clients could access wired clients, but wired clients could not access wireless clients. Switching the routers' roles would result in a reversal of this... Wired could access wireless, but not vice-versa. To end up in a mutually-exclusive security model, that would be most-easily accomplished with three routers. Two wired, and one wireless. You run one wired router with DHCP, and then plug the remaining WAN ports into the first wired switch. Now wireless and wired each have their own isolated network... They still access the same internet connection, but cannot communicate between each other. If you can get new routers for $5, then this is a viable solution because it only costs you $10. The disadvantage to this is the addition of 2 hops where only 1 existed before. However they should be under 1ms, so it's not that big of a deal. Only when you're already near the max TTL for a server will this affect you.
     
  6. Grifter

    Grifter Silver Member

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    do i need crossovers to connect routers or switches to each other?
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    In theory, yes. However, some routers have a built-in auto-detect feature that will detect another switch connected via a patch cable and will perform the crossover, internally. This is still a "crossover" per-say, but the conversion is done for you, using a standard patch cable. Of course, you could (and should) still use a crossover.

    Netgear routers, for example, are notorious for this "feature".
     
  8. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    If you're running your wired and wireless routers on the same subnet, how is one more secure than the other? You're creating a wireless access point by not using the WAN port, but every computer still has the same rights once they gain access to that subnet. It wouldn't make a difference if you used either Router's DHCP service in this case.
     
  9. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    The way I was telling him to do it they are NOT on the same subnet. However, for the way I have mine set up, they are on the same subnet. It is more secure because my wireless clients must have their MAC address explicitly defined in my ACL in order to gain access, and all transmissions are WPA-encrypted. By having 2 routers, one acting merely as an Access Point, I can setup the MAC filtering requirement seperate from my wired network, making wired clients strictly plug-n-play, while my wireless clients require additional setup via the router. Keeps my system as secure as possible with as little inconvenience as possible.
     
  10. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    So your wireless router's MAC address filter applies to wired connections too? Otherwise I don't see the point in having two routers
     
  11. Grifter

    Grifter Silver Member

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    ok i have wired router at 1.2 and wireless router at 1.3
    they are connected thus:
    modem -> wired -> crossover -> wireless port1
    wired router starts dhcp at 192.168.1.150 (earlier it was saying conflict with same IPs) :dunno:
    both networks can access internet
    but i can access the wired router with a wireless client and the wireless router with a wired client
    the wired client cant ping a wireless client and vice versa
    everything uses 1.2 as the gateway
    is all this normal?


    ive setup MAC filtering for the wireless router and it works for the laptop but it doesnt see the psp, nor does the psp see my router
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2005
  12. Grifter

    Grifter Silver Member

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    update:
    ive got the psp to see the router
    everything is working except i still wanna get feedback about the setup :hs:
     

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