Winged scapula/shoulderblade

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Victoriono, Jan 6, 2008.

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  1. Victoriono

    Victoriono New Member

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    My shoulderblades point out abit.

    What muscles to exercise and do you have any good exercises to treat this?
     
  2. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    serratus anterior
     
  3. kit99bar

    kit99bar USPA Class 2, weak, old man!

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    what does point out a bit mean?
     
  4. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    pretty sure it means his shoulders are rolled inwards from the sides.



    Pushups, face pulls, and shrugs will help.
     
  5. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    TREATMENT. The emphasis is on correcting the scapular tilting or winging. The tilting is most readily corrected by stretching the pectoralis minor muscle, which usually requires another person's assistance. Serratus anterior muscle retraining and strengthening is also necessary. Quadruped rocking from the position of sitting on the heels where the weight on the shoulder girdle is minimal and rocking forward to the neutral position is a good exercise for controlling the force demands on the serratus anterior muscle.

    If the scapula wings in the resting position and during shoulder flexion, then the serratus anterior muscle is weak and strengthening is indicated. If the scapula only wings during the first phase of the motion, the quadruped rocking is a good exercise, but the therapist should monitor to ensure that the scapula does not wing because of excessive load. The exercise with the patient positioned against the wall keeping the scapula fixed against the wall, with the elbow flexed to 120 degrees and then flexing the shoulder to no more than about 60 degrees, is a good way to control the winging occurring on initiation of motion. If the patient can complete shoulder flexion with the elbow flexed and without scapular winging, then he or she should move away from the wall so that the scapula is not restricted while doing upward rotation.

    (Sahrmann)
     
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