Windows not recognizing whole hard drive

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Lateralus, Jun 12, 2005.

  1. Lateralus

    Lateralus New Member

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    I have a 250G Western Digital hard drive and XP only recognizes up to 232G. It's not a big deal just because its only 18G but I was just wondering why that is.
     
  2. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    because western digital ripped you off. That "250GB" drive you bought is really only 232.831GB. You should call and bitch them out and demand your remaining 17.1694GB back, or a refund for the pro-rated amount :roofles:

    WD ownz j00 with 1000B per KB. 1000KB per MB. 1000MB per GB.

    In real life, there are 1024B per KB. 1024KB per MB. 1024MB per GB.

    So they make up their own numbers to make themselves look cool.
     
  3. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    It's working as designed. Drive manufactures and software companies seem to disagree on what makes a gigabyte. Drive manufactures use 1,000,000,000 bytes (so they can claim their drives are bigger) and while Microsoft uses 1,073,741,824. It really goes to a dispute between IEEE and computer scientists. So in a nutshell a drive shows up in windows as being 93% of the size printed on the box.
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    as far as I can remember, a Byte has always contained 8 bits. And a Kilobyte has always been 1024 Bytes.
     
  5. Zourn

    Zourn 16-bit Ninja OT Supporter

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    it says on the front of the box that 1 GB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes, so you're not getting ripped off, just not shopping smartly.
     
  6. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    The problem is that Kilo (and Mega, and Giga) indicate a base-10, not a base-2 product. Remember, Kilo is an SI unit prefix which is based on multiples of 10. IEC (later adopted by ISO and IEEE) published a standard to fix this so that Kilo would indicate a base-10 number and Kibi would indicate a base-2 number. The prefixes are: Kibi, Mebi, Gibi, etc. So a 250 Megabyte drive = 232 Mebibytes (MiB).

    Of course, no one uses the standard. Drive makers like using the larger numbers, and software makers are just lazy.

    So, in a nutshell, computer scientists misuse the SI unit prefixes and confusion ensues.

    The whole mess is documented here: http://www.cofc.edu/~frysingj/binprefixes.html
    ISO published standard is here: http://www.gscassociates.com/wg8/edcs/text/unit.html
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2005

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