Windows Media Player 11 + AVG Firewall = No Streaming!!! Help!

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Repentinus, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. Repentinus

    Repentinus New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lawton, OK
    I am trying to stream media from my PC to my XBox 360 with the AVG Firewall activated. Before installing the AVG Suite I was able to do so. However, afterwards my X360 was unable to contact my computer. I know its due to the firewall due to the fact that once its disabled everything works fine.

    The only application I was asked to allow was the Windows Media Player Network Sharing Service, which I did allow. However this did not help.

    I also manually allowed Windows Media Player as an allowed application, again to no avail.

    Thank you for your time.
     
  2. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

    Joined:
    May 6, 2000
    Messages:
    52,499
    Likes Received:
    310
    Location:
    Northwest Mejicooooooo
    Software firewalls suck. Don't use them.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    You don't need AVG Firewall. Windows already has a firewall. So does your router. So does your internet service provider. Firewalls aren't cumulative -- you're not safer behind more firewalls, unless none of them are set up properly.

    Firewalls block internet traffic by deleting incoming data packets that don't have approved port numbers on them. The port number, for the sake of this explanation, is just a way to point the data packet in the direction of the program on your computer designed to use the data. When you open a website, for example, all of the incoming data packets are labeled with Port 80, which is the one that Internet Explorer (Firefox, Opera, whatever) expects to get all of its data from. As long as Internet Explorer is open, it will have "dibs" on whatever data comes with a Port 80 label on it, and if it doesn't know what to do with that data, it will do nothing. (or it should do nothing, anyway.)

    So if a hacker tries to break in by sending data with Port 80 labels on them, Internet Explorer will be confused by it and throw it away. And if it doesn't throw the data away, but instead somehow allows the hacker to access your computer, no firewall can save you anyway.
     

Share This Page