A&P Why I love Chase Jarvis

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by isaac86hatch, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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    "Sure, it's incredibly valuable to know the ins and outs of the technical side of photography. I'm a huge advocate of that and I've paid my dues. You should too. But understanding the fundamentals of light and the mechanics of a camera and all the techno babble that's all the rage online these days can only get you so far.

    DO use the back of your camera, and don't feel bad about it. Hell, go ahead and use a light meter and a 4x5 if you must - see if I care. Read reviews. Nerd out on gear. Whatever floats your boat.

    But one thing is for sure: don't ever confuse all the silly little gadgets and the silly little numbers with what it means to simply and eloquently capture a moment, a scene, or the essence of a human emotion - whatever it is that truly inspires you. You'll be much better off for it, I promise."

    :bowdown:
     
  2. TtamNedlog

    TtamNedlog OT Supporter

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    ^Very true. I love the technical aspects of photography, not because it makes me a better photographer, but because I used to be a math major and I'm just a number-loving kinda guy. It helps me maneuver around my camera controls of course, but when it comes to the bottom line, it's just a means to an end. That end: taking a good picture. In which case, I don't really care how I got there as long as I got there.
     
  3. Dwight Schrute

    Dwight Schrute New Member

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    I think a lot of people, myself included, get way too wrapped up in the technical details. True professionals, artists, can capture awe-inspiring photos with the simplest of equipment.

    For example:

    http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/multi_page.asp?cid=7-6468-7844

    These were all taken with Olympus point and shoots.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    I support this thread.
     
  5. Creator

    Creator The Creator Has a Master Plan

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    There are a lot of geeks who enjoy photography which ive always found interesting. Now i guess I understand (all the numbers and gadgets). Although I do love me some gadgets.
     
  6. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    I can't completely agree with this thread.

    I mean I understand his point - and agree that measurebating is a complete waste of fucking time - but anyone who expects to be consistant in any way, shape or form ABSOLUTELY needs to understand how a camera works.

    Even the people who successfully shoot with cameras as basic as pinholes and holgas understand the principles behind what is required to get a successful exposure.
     
  7. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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    This is true and he talks about that as well in his latest "series" of blogs. And I was hoping the film school people would chime in it on too. I think what really drew me to his comments is I feel the same way more and more every day.

    One thing that I just wish people would learn is that knowing all of the little details is imperative but that does not make you a good photographer, artist, designer etc. You have to get out and just do it. Initially when I took classes or would talk to those ahead of me I heard "shoot shoot shoot" not "study study study," ya know?

    Such is case in whatever thread of the day where people ask how do I do this or that with my camera. It's great to ask for that information to get a good jump-off point, but that is all it should be. From there, you must just get out and try. For Christ's sake, we almost all shoot digital, so there should be no reason why people should not just be out there playing with all of the settings until they get what they I want.

    I do all of this backwards. Usually I do not read "how to" sites and rarely do I stray from OTAP, so when I get some random-ass idea I just sketch it out and try to figure out the numbers then just try it. Over and over again I shoot. Moving lights here or there, lowering the f-stops or raising the shutter speed, something. So now, when I come across an idea for the paper or just for myself, I can pretty much nail it within the first few frames.

    That is what CJ is talking about. Do, don't ask. Figuring out things for yourself and trying to define your own style, instead of spending hours a day online asking how to do it before you click the shutter.

    The other thing that I see lately is all of the "rules" that internet jockeys have been making. "ZofGs!! the sky is blown" or measurebating 100% crops of sharpness or noise for example. Most people completely overlook great shots because they are too busy looking at the absolute details that only internet measurebators would notice.

    The truth is, is that the average consumer of photographs ie clients don't care one bit and they are the ones with money, not the faceless AVs on a website. I can't tell you how many times I have shown my work to clients and they pick out the shots that were "Technically" crappy because they love the expression, or the pose or candidness and then completely overlook what I may think is the best shot. Not everyone wants perfect photos, they love blurry, blown out, funny candids.

    I don't know where I am going with this, but in a nutshell I think photography is losing its soul. Not because more and more people are doing it, but because people are just shooting in bulk and forgetting why they are actually pointing that camera.

    You've got to have a vision or idea you can apply the techniques to, otherwise you are just simply showing the technique, which bores people.
     
  8. adamlewis88

    adamlewis88 New Member

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    Meh.

    You need to know those technical things. Thats what allows you to PLAN FOR and TAKE pictures in challenging conditions. Going out and just shooting may land you some nice pictures, but do you know how you took them? Do you know what camera you could have used to make it better? What lens would have worked better?

    Im so tired of hearing the whole "real pros can take pictures with anything" argument. Are you that surprised? Their life has been dedicated to this. They know the ins and outs of light and what a cameras limitations are.
    At the same time, Im sure they can take good pictures with a P&S but what do you think theyd say if you told them to give up their D3's and MkIII's and digital MF cameras for a P&S? Theyd laugh at you.

    For every great picture that was taken with a P&S camera, theres 100 more that were taken with serious equipment like an SLR.

    And Ill bet my entire kit that the overwhelming majority of actual working professional photographers know a good amount of technical information
     
  9. johan

    johan Active Member

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    yeah for sure, no one doubts that photography is a technical medium

    To me those "equipment doesn't matter/the moment is everything/etc.." stories are an exaggeration to wake up the guys who ONLY concentrate on numbers stats pixels etc.



    That technical ability is a tool -- really gotta have that squared away.

    but a crapass pic of an emotionally true & climactic moment is infinitely preferable to a boring, perfectly exposed, infinitely sharp picture that faithfully record the surface detail of the scene, but captures none of the underlying emotional content of that moment.


    I had a buddy that was one of these 'surface detailers' he picked up a dslr and was sooo excited. he'd snap pics and then immediately zoom into 100% and complain about the "sharpness". That and "oh my pics are blown" were the only two things I ever heard.

    Never mind the compositions were clumsy and confusing or downright painful to view. I couldn't listen to him anymore.

    A woodpecker pecking at the shutter release on a randomly aimed camera would've produced more interesting work.

    He concentrated on learning numbers, thinking about pixels, keeping his shit operating room clean....and never stopped to think about imagery....only numbers.


    It's guys like him that need to be told stop fucking with fstop and isos...switch to a simple camera and FIRST learn to use your eyes and your heart and feel the world.

    Maybe then your pics will actually say something...

    thats my take on this..
     
  10. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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    :bowdown:
     

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