Why could my OLDER gpu core handle FASTER speeds? (Nvidia)

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by sj23, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. sj23

    sj23 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Messages:
    9,658
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Parts Unknown
    Like the title says. I'm curious.

    My 5900xt was stock at 390/700 and could OC to 500/780 w/ no crashes. Now on my 6800GT stock at 370/1000 and OC'ing to ~415/1080 it crashes. Doesn't the latest in processing usually mean faster? Temps are fine at ~60C. :coolugh:
     
  2. Shibboleth

    Shibboleth teh mad Plato skillz

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,769
    Likes Received:
    0
    you're confusing stability with performance I think.
    A lot of times faster cores operate at higher temperatures, thus leaving them more prone to crashing. Also, it may be using myriad different specifications, such as voltage, or the width of the circuitry. it might turn out that you have to up the voltage on the core to sucessfully overclock it, or it may prove impossible.
    The fact is that processors were not built to be overclocked, and you do so with no gaurentee of stability. So cut your losses and just overclock it to the highest stable speed.

    cliffs: There is no relation between a faster processor and the amount of which you can safely overclock it.
     
  3. StevesVR4

    StevesVR4 Get Arrested

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2003
    Messages:
    7,328
    Likes Received:
    0
    Higher clock rates != more performance (when comparing different generations of a chip) The higher the clock rate for a processor, the more heat is generated. To counteract this problem, chip makers use various methods to increase the performance of the chip without increasing the clock rate and increasing the heat. So even though your 5900xt could run at a higher clock rate, your 6800GT is a faster card.
     
  4. sj23

    sj23 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Messages:
    9,658
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Parts Unknown
    So am I correct by saying that my 6800's processor is simply more "efficient"?
     
  5. StevesVR4

    StevesVR4 Get Arrested

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2003
    Messages:
    7,328
    Likes Received:
    0
    Basically yes. The 6800 can do more with less clock cycles.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Clock speed is only one factor; the number of math circuits in the chip also affects how many calculations can be performed per second. A "slower" chip with more math circuits and more memory to store the calculations in will do just as much work as a "faster" chip with fewer circuits and less memory.

    Imagine you were chained to the bottom of a swimming pool, and you were only allowed to breathe every certain number of seconds. Obviously, being able to hold your breath for a long time would be a good thing. That's how clock speed really affects an integrated circuit -- how long it has to operate in isolation from the rest of the circuit board before it can get input and send output again.
     

Share This Page