Which linux distribution should I use?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by pollux, Oct 14, 2004.

  1. pollux

    pollux OT Supporter

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    This is for a class of mine and they gave me the choice. I am using Virtual PC 2004 to run it, (which a friend suggested) and I am going to be setting up a webserver with Apache.
     
  2. WERUreo

    WERUreo Imua!

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    Different people are gonna suggest different distros. Each person has their preference. I use Fedora Core 2, but I'm sure others will come on and suggest anything from Slackware to Gentoo to SuSe. I've only used Fedora/Red Hat, so I don't know the difference. So, I suggest Fedora. :bigthumb:
     
  3. pollux

    pollux OT Supporter

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    The size is kinda big ~2 gB last time I checked. Are there better features compared to the rest? Size is somewhat important, since this will be on my laptop..
     
  4. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    SuSE is by far the best for someone who's no well-acquainted with Linux. Easier to setup/configure than Windows is and comes with everything you need.
     
  5. SL1200MK4

    SL1200MK4 New Member

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    I never used Virtual PC before, but VMware works for me...

    If you just need a webserver... try http://www.linuxiso.org/distro.php?distro=20

    TSL is probably one of the best compact linux out there... There are a few other distro with security in mind. But if I ever want to get more security out of my box, I had OpenBSD (which is not Linux)...

    Depends on comfortable you are with *nix based enviroment... TSL has no GUI, but it's nice and compact... Yes, you will need to handle everything from the command line, however it's not as bad once you learn it. I would suggest NOT to setup a server from GUI.
     
  6. Shaggy007

    Shaggy007 New Member

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    What kind of hardware are you looking to put this on by the way? Laptop? Desktop? Nvidia chipset? Just asking because some people have troubles with those chipsets, and you might want to get an idea of whats coming so you're not caught off gaurd. As far as what's best for you, it kinda depends on how much time you want to spend learning.

    If you just want to get your feet wet and get a basic feel of linux with a windows manager there are distros like Suse where the hardware support is awesome but it doesn't really let you learn about the way things work under the surface.

    If you want to get into the nitty gritty dirtyness of linux there are distros such as gentoo and debian. where you'll be with a terminal prompt for most of the time.

    Then there are the middle ground distros such as slackware, and mandrake which are a little of both worlds.
     
  7. pollux

    pollux OT Supporter

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    Laptop
    Averatec 3225HS-- it runs on 1.5 athon xp-m, 512 ddr 333 ram, 40 gb hard drive..

    This is one of my hw sections

    Part 1a: More Linux Commands
    1. What does the cat command do? How about the less command? How is less related to the more command?
    2. What does the grep command do? What are regular expressions? Regular expressions are a very large topic, so we won't cover them in depth here. You should, however, familiarize yourself with at least what ? and * mean in a regular expression. What do each of those characters mean in a regular expression, i.e. what do they match?
    3. What does the alias command do? How might this be useful?
    4. Something else you might find useful as well are environment variables. These are variables you can define and use in both interactive (i.e. you type a command, it spits out something at you, yu type in more commands, etc.) and non-interactive (e.g. a shell script) shells. If you're using tcsh (find out with 'echo $SHELL'), you can set an environment variable using the setenv command, e.g. setenv INSTALL_DIR '/tmp' (not that you'd actually do this, I hope). For bash, the analog is the export command, e.g. export INSTALL_DIR='/tmp' (note that there is an equal sign this time). For added fun, you can even nest them together, e.g. export INSTALL_DIR="$HOME/newpath" (be careful to use double quotes instead of single quotes in case you want to use an environment variable). Write a line that will set the INSTALL_DIR environment variable to a directory in your home directory, i.e. /(your home directory)/install. As an added bonus, can you say why we use double quotes when we want to do environment variable substitution? What else gets expanded in double quotes? What happens within single quotes? We'll be using environment variables more later in the class, so you should get to know them.


    I also have to compile Apache later.
    So yeah, I do have to learn Linux stuff anyway.
     
  8. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    SuSE, RedHat, or Debian if you know command line.
     
  9. SL1200MK4

    SL1200MK4 New Member

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    If you got questions regarding your hmwk... drop me a line... I will help if I got the time...

    If it's for schoo, and you something easy to use... Then I can tell you that SuSE is not easy to install over ftp/http, so you will need the iso image, and nope, the personal edition won't cover it, doesn't even come with compiler.

    Debian and Gentoo is probably a bit much for you at this point.

    Try out Fedora and see how you like it. I think it's kinda gay, but well it's structured in a way that it is very similar to Red Hat, shouldn't be hard to get started with it.

    Is compiling the webserver part of your assignment? if not, you don't have to compile it, you can just install the binary I suppose. There are pros and cons of install from binary and using a package management system.
     
  10. korrupshun

    korrupshun New Member

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    If size is an issue use a Knoppix distro (just never power down and you'll be fine heh).....most distros are now 2+ CDs so your gonna have a fun time finding a smaller one, personally i take slackware everytime......gentoo is gonna be a bit advanced if your just trying to learn (slack maybe as well)...if you want easy go mandrake, hell it damn near installs itself and have plenty of easy to use setup apps for things like samba and apache....mandrake is typically (from what ive read) the best "starter" distro
     
  11. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Agreed.. Fedora is a DVD's worth (or 5 CD's I think?)..RedHat, FreeBSD are both 2+ CD's..

    The cool part of linux is the fact that you decide what you want to install, at installation time. If space is at a premium, chose only what you need and nothing more.

    Mandrake or RedHat are my two recommendations..
     
  12. Shaggy007

    Shaggy007 New Member

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    Hmm you might want to try using Mandrake, personally I stopped using redhat when they switched to fedora cause it sucked majorily, but that's just me. You can get the cd's for Mandrake easily through their website or check to see if there's a LUG(linux user group) in your area, they're usually good to buy a distro on cd off of for cheap if you're low on bandwidth. Sometimes their nice enough to just burn them for ya for free.

    Here is a website about running debian on your laptop. Should you choose that as your distro.
    http://www.ravencode.com/content/article.php?a=averatec

    By the way your wireless card will not work automatically, it just wont. So don't be too pissed off when it's not working.
     
  13. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    It might under SuSE, I've seen it automatically detect and configure some wireless cards. Otherwise you can make it work pretty easily with ndiswrapper.
     
  14. Shaggy007

    Shaggy007 New Member

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    It's a broadcom card, he'll have to ndis it.
     
  15. pollux

    pollux OT Supporter

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    I don't think I need my wireless card working on Linux.

    Anyways, I decided to go with Mandrake. I was also thinking of Fedora but I heard there were some complications with VPC. Now, I need to finish downloading. BTW, thanks for all the help so far.
     
  16. pollux

    pollux OT Supporter

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    Yeah I have to compile it.
     

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