A&P What's your keep rate?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by redna, Mar 8, 2007.

  1. redna

    redna New Member

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    I was reading the article here:
    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/aa-07-worked.shtml

    And came across this:
    It made me feel a little better about shooting 150 frames and only keeping 25-45 of them.. haha.
     
  2. dano

    dano OT Supporter

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    My first time out with my XTi I took something like 100, kept about 15. I'm way more hard on myself about the stuff I keep now that I have a camera that's worth a damn.
     
  3. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    better than that, but its all relative, theres new if any that have as strong of criticism for their won work or as strong of portfolios, so I gain a lot of new pieces with each big shoot. 3 weeks on non stop shooting is a lot of time.

    for paid work, I shoot maybe 1500 in a day, show them 300 as proofs, maybe 150 make it to an album, maybe 10 into loose prints.
     
  4. Hippy

    Hippy New Member

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    i keep every serious shot i take. things like snapshots and stuff i dont always bother to keep.

    Why expouse the frame if it isnt right?
     
  5. mooredodge

    mooredodge 3,2,1 I'm the bomb...and I'm ready to go off in yo

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    I usually keep roughly 1 in 100, or at least 1 in 100 that I'd print.
     
  6. SenenCito

    SenenCito OT Supporter

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    about 10%

    was bigger but as ive been getting more and more critical about my work ive kept less
     
  7. DXC

    DXC New Member

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    when shooting casual/informal subject matter (parties/dinners etc) i will keep about 50% ... these are then pared down according to what is needed/required by myself and (of course) the final prints are chosen by the clients/subjects ... the final result is about 10% .
    digital photography does have economic advantages ... and serves as an aid in improving ones skills ... you can venture to take chances on shots and not put a big hole in your wallet .

    shooting set-up subject matter (portraits, scenery, etc) has a much better shot/keeper ratio ... about 90% overall .

    my "goofing around" and "lemme try this ..." stuff ratio varies a LOT , but i guess that about 10% is worth printing .
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2007
  8. peoplescar

    peoplescar Guest

    i shot 461 pictures this weekend and kept about 30...

    i take the same picture a couple times though to make sure i get it. don't want to get back to the PC and find out its blurry. especially when shooting cars.
     
  9. Tedrzz

    Tedrzz New Member

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    when i first started every shot was a keeper for me:mamoru: but now i'd say 5-10 percent of my shots are keepers. which i can't complain about
     
  10. BeachBoy

    BeachBoy New Member

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    On my last 3 trips I kept about 50 per trip out of about 500 taken per trip for post processing (~10%), of which I'd maybe print/enlarge 1 or 2 so ~0.3%.

    but for trips I also make a more snapshot-like album which contains about 100 shots from the 500. Those are not as good, but show the culture or other aspects of the country/place. but I don't consider thos in the keeper ratio since it's mostly for souvenirs than anything else.
     
  11. Hippy

    Hippy New Member

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    wtf do u guys just run around snapping pics without thinking whats in the frame? how can u take 450 pictures that arnt worth shit?
     
  12. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    any idea how many rolls of film national geo used to shoot back in the day for a single story?
     
  13. kronik85

    kronik85 New Member

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    i'll shoot in 2-3 shot bursts alot, or sometimes you try to anticipate a good shot and it sucked. life's dynamic and changing, not everything is a static 1 shot done deal.
     
  14. BeachBoy

    BeachBoy New Member

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    there is a big difference between one that I won't edit and one that ain't worth shit.

    on my 500 pictures, probably 400 would easily make it to any family trip album. But in my standards, they aren't good enough. if for you a keeper is what you can get from a disposable camera, then yes out of 500 at least 400 are good.
     
  15. DXC

    DXC New Member

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    " any idea how many rolls of film national geo used to shoot back in the day for a single story? "

    does anybody else recall the issue of national geographic that was about / went into detail about the evolution of photograpy (especially color) as in reference to their magazine ... it was a good read .
    there was a part about the first underwater color photographs . they set up a raft with large amounts of flash powder on it in order to get the light needed to expose the reeeeally slow emulsions . one of the guys was checking on something and the powder went off , burning him pretty badly .

    (not meaning to hijack the thread)
     
  16. Hippy

    Hippy New Member

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    My favorite nation geographic artical of all time was about a guy who expoused 1 frame a day for a month. He of course had 30 spectacular images printed with the artical. Have some patience and think about your shots and you can cut down on the amount of frames u expouse by a ton. You think the great photographers of the american west went around snapping 500 pics a day with there 8x10's?
     
  17. Jonny Chimpo

    Jonny Chimpo OT Supporter

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  18. vwpilot

    vwpilot New Member

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    But with both of those statements you also show how little you know about photography and what some photographers call "keepers."

    For your first quote, there are any number of things that could cause someone to take more photos than 1 shot for 1 keeper. Are they shooting something they have total control of or are they shooting something like sports?

    One is definitely going to have a lot higher keeper ratio than the other.

    Recently there was a show on PBS about a Nat Geo photographer and he said that he did an assignement that he shot 1500 ROLLS of film on (probably 36 exp too) and of course maybe a dozen ran in the article.

    There are shooters out there that have shot hundreds of thousands of images in their lifetime, but might have a portfolio with 15 images in it.

    In both of those circumstances do you think that they only have that many good shots out of all those images. No. But they only have that many GREAT images out of all those photos, or maybe what they consider worthy.

    The better you get, the worse you think you are doing from a standpoint of "keepers" because you get more critical and you have more to compare to.

    I will go to Sebring next week and probably shoot between 3000 and 5000 images of the race week. I'll end up with a gallery of maybe a couple hundred shots. I'll deliver somehwere between 30-50 shots to each client. I may have only a handful that I would consider putting into a portfolio or showing another potential client.

    However, someone else might look at them and think that 80% of them they would love to have in their portfolio.

    I could go there and I could shoot one photo each day and come home with 7 great photos. Would I be able to show them to virutally anyone that isnt a pro motorsports photographer and have them think every one is wonderful. Probably. Would they all be portfolio images, Probably not.

    Does that mean that I should go out and try to make sure that every shot comes back a portfolio image. Yes and no. I should try to make every shot a portfolio image, but its illogical to think it can be done and in doing so, I would also give up the chance at many other great images I could make and would also fail to deliver the images to my clients that needed to be delivered. Not every shot someone pays you for is a portfolio shot, or needs to be.

    How many shots do you think it would take to capture this image?

    [​IMG]

    Maybe it only takes one, but more than likely even the best are going to be going through 10, 20, 40, or more shots to get that one where the car and everything comes together just perfectly. Is it a portfolio shot? Maybe. But having shot that shot before, maybe not for me.

    Do I not take it since I've done it before? No way, I absolutely take and its a basic keeper. If that is my client, or maybe Yokahama, they would love that shot, doesnt matter if I consider it a personal keeper or not.

    Sorry, I tend to be long winded, but the point I'm trying to make is that I could consider 80 or 90 percent of my shots basic keepers. They are in focus, they are good composition, and they work and anyone would not call them a failed shot. Someone else may think that 50% of my shots they would love in their portfolio and would be the best shots they ever took. 30% might be good and unique and are loved by my clients. But only 1% or less might be a personal keeper or triumph for me and what I would consider a TRUE keeper.

    The difference is there are flat out basic keepers and there are those special shots that you are totally proud you can produce. As you get more experience, those really special shots are harder and harder to come by. Its also dependent on what you shoot and who your clients are and needs for shooting are.

    So just cause I say that maybe 1 in a thousand shots for me is a keeper, it doesnt mean I'm out there firing off my 1D at 8fps like a movie camera hoping to catch a shot.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2007
  19. brasheye

    brasheye Rotary Crew

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    107% of my shots are keepers.
     
  20. BeachBoy

    BeachBoy New Member

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    vwpilot, great answer
     
  21. Tedrzz

    Tedrzz New Member

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    OWNED
     
  22. MawcDrums

    MawcDrums Active Member

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  23. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    God damnit, I wanted to be the first to say a % over 100.

    If I'm shooting a party for friends keeper rate is like 90% because it's just about recording the event.

    If I'm shooting landscape for pleasure, and I'm ONLY out shooting keeper rate is probably 30% or so.

    If I'm doing something else and taking pictures (like traveling) printable pictures from something like that would be around 5%... I'd still keep the pictures though because travel again is more about recording locations you've been to.
     
  24. Hippy

    Hippy New Member

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    This shows how little you know about me...

    Im not disagreeing with anything your saying here, im just trying to express the importance of intent in photography. I see so many people going around these days shooting without thinking about how much dynamic range is in the scene, what the best DOF or Shutter speed is for the subject, or how the compistion plays in the image.

    When some photo noob comes in here and reads that alot of pros take 1000 shots and get one "keeper" (which im going to define as an image that would satisfy either your artistic vision or a clients needs on the buisness side) they are gonna just start expousing a scene at 5-6 different expousers, not bother to meter the scene correctly, and just forget about there DOF and simply autofocus onto the subject.

    I saw this all the time in photo school and it drove me nuts.

    Just step back and think about your images before you make them and your gonna see your success rate skyrocket. Of course if you are shooting a race your gonna have a lower "keep" rate simply because its such a dynamic subject and requires split second decision making during lighting situations which are usally dynamic.
     
  25. DXC

    DXC New Member

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    hippy ,

    i think what you are getting at is the same premis that made kodak (george eastman anyway) an innovator and industry standard . he/they created the industry (and other companies followed suit) . the philosophy was simple ; a simple camera that anyone could use that was affordable ... you shoot the pix , send the camera off and you get back the prints , negatives and a fresh load of film .
    the term "point-n-shoot" accurately describes what (probably) 95 percent of the users did ... and eastman made a lot of money off that and in turn the profits went toward r&d for furthering the photographic industry (commercial , industrial and cinematic) .

    today , i see a lot of people doing exactly what was done with the "joe blow" cameras of old ... the difference today being of course that it is digital . the industry (et al) caters to these vast numbers ... look at the availability of styles , features and price ranges ... it's pretty much the same old wine in a brand new bottle .

    there are a couple of differences with digital ... the ability to rapidly see-what-ya-got and control of processing/printing has (i believe) allowed/caused more people to ask questions , try to improve and frequent forums such as this one . what i would term it as is an increase in the number of "serious amatures" .

    mia culpa ... i shot a LOT of pix when i got my first digital ... it was kind of cool to be able to juuuussst delete the crap shots .
     

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