What's up with all these open source and free projects?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by VBGOD, Jun 28, 2003.

  1. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    :ugh:

    I'm checking out this IDE called NetBeans. It's a multi-platform development tool available for Windows, Linux, Solaris, and Apple/Mac. This program is an add-on to Java 1.3 and higher. Not only that, but it also allows for C/C++ development. Oh, and it's free. Not only is it free, but the source code is available. Please, clue me in here. WHY would you work for nothing? Is it to make the world a better place? Fuck that. It's all about getting paid. My theory is that these people aren't business people at all. They want to do what all developers (including myself) want to do - make/code a product and not have to deal with the real world ugly issues of selling. Support? "Hey, it's free. We just program here". They're still little kids at heart. In a perfect world, I'd just keep making projects and not have to deal with the sales and human aspects of the projects.

    http://www.netbeans.org/images/screenshots/3.5/win-Editing.png
    Windows 2000

    http://www.netbeans.org/images/screenshots/3.3/osx-javadoc.png
    Mac OSX


    http://www.netbeans.org/images/screenshots/3.5/linux_editing.png
    Linux
     
  2. worth

    worth Guest

    Bingo.
     
  3. Tk

    Tk Well-Known Member

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    looks like lots of $$ could be made from that :hs:
     
  4. Soren

    Soren OT Supporter

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    how do they pay for webspace? bandwith? living costs? or possible offices and legal shit?
     
  5. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    Maybe this is something they don't get paid for, but obviously they make money in someway. Whether that's a normal job, or being supported by a company, I don't know.

    Some people made their money a couple of years ago, so they don't need a paycheck every two weeks. Doing what they love without worrying about money may not be such a problem after all. :big grin: ;)

    For many people (including all of the Arts majors that jumped on the train during the boom), it is. And honestly I was thinking about money at first too. But I really love what I do. Money isn't on my mind anymore. As long as I'm happy with what I do, I honestly don't care. I know I'll have enough to support myself and a family someday, but I'm not out to make millions or anything.

    I agree. Why, because I'm one myself. :p I'm about to go through a badass business program at school and it makes me feel sick. I wish we had a full two years of IS classes instead of the business, but we don't. And it's a little late to turn around and do CS. I just wanna code. :hs:
     
  6. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    I'll be honest and say that I'd do the same exact thing IF I already had some money. In my case, this is how I eat and survive. Also, small open source projects (in my opinion) are fine. It's the larger/HUGE open source projects that are a little weird.
     
  7. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    Donations?

    They're rich?

    :dunno:
     
  8. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    They should charge at least $200 for a program such as NetBeans.
     
  9. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    The larger projects are usually backed by some corporation or organization that makes money through donations. From what I understand at least. :dunno:
     
  10. Moongerm

    Moongerm Guest

    open source = shit quality software. Nothing beats a paid team of pro developers.
     
  11. court-jester

    court-jester I love dykes

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    :rofl:
     
  12. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    People wouldn't buy it. They would either pirate it or find something better that is free. I believe there is a new IDE that is backed by IBM that is free. I think it's http://www.eclipse.org/ . One guy I used to work with called me from St Louis to have me check it out. A free IDE that is better than JBuilder (~$3000 for Enterprise), not bad. :big grin:
     
  13. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    ahhahahahahhahahahahahaha

    :deep breath:

    ahhahahahahhahahahahahaha
     
  14. court-jester

    court-jester I love dykes

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    no one is gonne pay 200 bux for any program these days, a small developer needs to obtain a following by releasing free releases and eventually make a name for themselves. later on once a lot of people are using ur program u can start charging fees since people already depend on ur program..just my thought
     
  15. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    Well, you started off correctly. It should go:

    Nothing beats the heart of a volunteer...
     
  16. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    Why would they pirate it? Let's say they never offered the source code or zero price tag. I'm sure there are tons of IT companies (that want to be legit I might add) would buy their software. Not in record numbers, but I'm sure they can easily make a few thousand.

    I never got into Jbuilder. I know it's the best Java tool out there, but it's a little too big. I like Sun's Studio One program. :o
     
  17. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    Wait. So your'e saying software can not sell?

    How does Microsoft sell billions of dollars in software every year? There are some, strike that, there are a lot of people that don't pirate all their software. I'm been at many companies, and they all have one thing on common: they all want/need to be legit. Maybe free software is fun for me, you, and most of OT, but business with many computers are a much larger target. No one is going to care how many MP3s, warze, and other items you may have. They will care about a business with 15-30 computers in the office.
     
  18. perry

    perry burp

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    Why only have 5 developers in one office working on a project? Why not let the source code into the wild and have people all over the world looking at your work, making improvements, and fixing bugs? Why tie your users to what you want them to do with your program; why not give them the freedom to modify your program to better suit their needs?

    Companies can create software that suits their needs, pay their developers, but then release the software to the world to use. Release the source with it and the company has thousands of eyes looking at their source and making improvements.. maybe even fixing some stuff that their paid developers couldn't fix, or adding things that their paid developers didn't think about...
     
  19. iZero

    iZero Guest

    A lot of open source projects start out as an educational exercise. Someone might be going for their Bachelors, Masters, or Doctorate and need to do a large project. So they develop it, kick it around a little, and release it online. Most aren't worth any money anyway, as they're pretty limited in what they do or are difficult to use/apply. Often times there is better commercial software that does the same things the open source program does.
     
  20. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    You see, I have heard this before, and what you say does makes sense, but how come that doesn't translate to the real world? Open source shouldtranslate to more stable apps, but most of these open source projects are rough at best. They're either missing a lot features, have tons of bugs, or lack the refinement of a program that had a lot of money thrown into it. I believe projects that deal with money have pressure attached to them. Projects that are free are basically more care free. Something doesn't work? Hey, we'll get to it in a few months. Pay for something? We'll fix that right away. Do you understand where I'm coming from here?
     
  21. iZero

    iZero Guest

    He's saying companies use the bait and switch. Take Trillian for instance. They had a version of it out there for a while, and it was free. Users helped debug it, and Trillian created their first commercial program which they wanted people to pay for. The idea is people had grown accustomed to using Trillian, so they'd be more likely to shell out the cash. It seems like every "freeware" program eventually becomes non-free now-a-days. Other examples include Ad-Aware and ZoneAlarm.
     
  22. VBGOD

    VBGOD Guest

    Exactly!
     
  23. perry

    perry burp

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    One example of a neat program... MythTV . It turns your Linux machine into a PVR with Tivo like fucntions. It started out because the main author wanted the program, but nothing existed. So he started it and released it to the world... People thought, "Hey, cool, I like what this guy has done, let me see if I can help out.." and it's grown from there.
     
  24. surrender

    surrender [ON MEDS]

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    A lot of open source projects (GIMP, KDE, and GnuCash come to mind) were created to attract more users to an open-source platform. Why?

    1) You've got the GNU types, who geniunely believe that Linux/BSD/BigPenix is a far better OS than any others available and want to create useful applications to better the community

    2) Then there are others who use an open-source project to attract attention to themselves as a programmer so they can get hired by Red Hat, Caldera, or Ximian
     
  25. perry

    perry burp

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    Free Software: Something doesn't work? Fix it yourself. Hire someone to fix it. We'll fix it in a few months. We'll fix it right away.

    Non-Free Software: Something doesn't work? We'll fix it when we get around to it.

    Free software does not mean low quality, buggy software. Non-free software does not mean high qualify, bug free software. It all depends on the developer.
     

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