A&P What's right, what's wrong with my pictures?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by ASIGN_Baz, Jul 11, 2009.

  1. ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Messages:
    2,574
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    Hi everyone. I am trying to develop my skills in capture. All I have is a Canon 400D (XTI) and the two kit lenses 18-55 and 70 -300. a few macro screw-ons and a FD (whatever that is) filter. It turns everything reddish. I think it is supposed to improve contrast. Not sure how or where to use it.

    I would like to know the opinions of some of you seasoned proffessionals, if I am heading in the right direction or not. Please be brutally honest, but constructively explain why.

    Much appreciated,

    Baz.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ok_computer

    ok_computer OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Messages:
    15,615
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    - Try to stay away from on camera flash, it's almost never appealing. It's harsh, virtually uncontrollable, and it flattens stuff out. Don't think this means "Stay away from flash", because flash can be a tool that completely changes a scene to how you want it to look, just stay away from the pop-up flash.

    -1, 5, 6 have some sharpness issues.
    -----1: I'll ignore the composition on this one, just to comment on focussing.. If this is your composition, it probably should be focussed on the part of the tree relatively close to you. Since that's soft, the whole photo seems soft and it's hard to know what I'm supposed to be looking at. The composition is weird, I don't really see how it works for the photo. Usually when stuff is centered and not symmetrical it looks a bit goofy, and if you're going to centre it, make sure it's EXACTLY centered, this one's a bit off.
    --------5,6: I'm not sure what's in focus here, but not much is. It could be an issue with a cheap tripod or something, but there isn't much to look at here. It's all a bit soft.

    The one's I didn't specifically address just aren't relaly worth addressing.. They're boring to me, but at least you're shooting. If you're shooting, you're learning the technical part, and then you can work on compositions and subjects when using the features of the camera are second nature.
     
  3. DRAIGON

    DRAIGON New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Messages:
    743
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Texas
    snapshot
     
  4. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2003
    Messages:
    35,257
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern California
    1 - Having the flash lighting up the base with the top dark ruins the picture. It is framed pretty well, but you need to photoshop out the other tree up top.

    2 - Flash is kinda harsh...looks like a snapshot.

    3 - I like this one...next time have more of the drops in focus and see how that looks.

    4 - Very much a snapshot...it looks like you pointed the camera at the mushrooms and took a picture without much thought. Next time change the angle (shy away from taking pictures from the top down of anything smaller than you...you want to provide new perspectives) by putting the camera down on the ground next to the mushrooms. Angle it so that the mushroom stalks take up most of your pictures e.g. | | | | so that it looks like a giant mushroom forest.

    5 - Parts of the sky are overexposed, the rest is underexposed. I personally would have appreciated more symmetry (same amount of sky and water) in the picture.

    6 - Nice colors, but again the exposure is off. The horizon is also not level, which can be fixed in post. The stuff in the bottom left is also distracting.
     
  5. Section8

    Section8 .

    Joined:
    May 29, 2001
    Messages:
    99,761
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Golden, CO
    Everyone has hit on what i would have suggested, but I just wanted to reiterate the importance of trying to avoid on camera flash. If you don't have a speedlight yet, start saving for one and stop using the pop up.

    Keep shooting and don't get discouraged by the critique you get here, you'll be hard pressed to find good, honest critic elsewhere.
     
  6. ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Messages:
    2,574
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    Thanks so very much everyone! I really appreciate the honest and constructive comments here. If I don't make mistakes, I won't learn.

    Thanks for no throwaway lines about practice and experiment - that's what I am doing.

    I am going out there again next Saturday so I will try to shoot the same targets again and see how I go!

    You guys are great. Thanks!

    Baz.
     
  7. alexromo

    alexromo New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Messages:
    4,571
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wahiawa
    .
     
  8. Drunken Karnie Midget

    Drunken Karnie Midget In Yeo We Trust, All Others Pay Cash OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2004
    Messages:
    39,145
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dirty Canada
    One thing that'll help you on the last two landscapes, is to center weight your metering, and meter off the ground/water, rather than an average of the overall view... and throw your camera on a tripod so you can rock a longer exposure (it'll be necessary for this shot, not just a suggestion)
     
  9. ASIGN_Baz

    ASIGN_Baz New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Messages:
    2,574
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    I actually was on a tripod, but I get your point. Thanks guys.

    Baz.
     

Share This Page