A&P what's my biggest fustration about lighting?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Joe, Jul 11, 2003.

  1. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

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    getting the damn reflection of the lights out of the people's eyes!

    didn't bug me at first till my teacher pointed it out, and i can never get what i want without getting the little reflections of my light boxes out of their eyes... most people don't even notice it but it bugs the hell out of me...

    moving the heights/location/angle of the lights doesn't help because then i don't get the effect i want...

    ARGH![/rant]

    (had a roll come back and 75% of the slides have 3 boxes in the eyes)
     
  2. TypeSDragoon

    TypeSDragoon Guest

    do you have that thing that attaches to the front of the light box that covers "encloses" the box and covers the light?

    it's called a front diffuser
    i'm not sure if that helps, but maybe it does
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    joey,
    I'm not sure why you object to a reflection in the eyes. I TRY to make sure that I have an eye light in order to get these reflections. It helps to bring life to the eyes. In Hollywood, they use a small light that mounts above the lens whose only function is to give an "eye light". However I can understand your point if you see three different reflections. Ideally you only want to see one.

    If you really don't want any reflections all you have to do is move your key light to the side of your subject and use another light or a bounce card to fill in the shadow side. I think you'll find however that the eyes will tend to look "dead". If you want to just see one reflection make sure you only have one light in front of the subject. Don't put a fill light on the opposite angle. See the rule below.

    TypeS, adding diffusion won't help, it just makes the light a little softer. There is an old photography rule that goes something like "the angle of incidence equals the angle of reflection" meaning that if you move a light 45 degrees from a shinny subject the light will reflect back on the opposite 45 degree angle. If the camera "sees" that angle you'll get a reflection of the light. Eyes, being round shinny objects, tend to reflect all the light that's placed in front of them. That's why you have to move the light 90 degrees or more so as to not see the reflection.

    Cheers
    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2003
  4. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

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    yeah, my boxes had diffusers...

    the only time i ever got it to work the way i wanted to i had to use 5 heads and that was a pain in the butt... mainly cause we didn't have enough reflectors and softboxes so we ended up using cardboard taped to the lights to shape the light...

    i understand wanting one light reflected (i found that a light set behind me with an umbrella, a bit toward the direction the subject is facing (if they're turned a bit toward my right, then i put the light about a foot and a half over and about 2 feet above my head) works out okay

    what happened this time was i really wanted to get some "scary" lighting so most of the lights were placed around waist level... i thought if i had the camera low enough, and they wern't looking directly at the camera, i could get the reflection of the boxes to be blocked out by their eyelids... ended up just barely missing... i couldn't bounce it off a board (like i usually do to try and avoid the problem, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't) cause it would have spilled too much light onto the subject

    bah, time to try again... i'm gona reshoot and going to try a cardboard rig to kill the light at the subject's neck this time and see if i can't place a light almost directly below them and fire it straight up...
     
  5. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Joey,
    Keep your lighting simple, even for unusual angles. There really is no need to use multiple lights in front of a subject. In most cases you should only have one key source, one fill (or just use a white card or reflector for fill) a hair light, a kicker and whatever light you need for the background. Adding more lights adds shadows that must be contolled.

    If you want to do the scary look, use a hard light instead of a soft light so you'll have sharp shadows. Controling the unwanted spill is much easier with hard lights than with soft lights.

    Cheers
    Jim
     

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