A&P What type of film should I use??

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Brsboarder1, Jun 15, 2004.

  1. Brsboarder1

    Brsboarder1 New Member

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    Im going on a trip to africa, im not going to be able to get film while im there, so i need to buy it all now, im wondering what your choice of film is, howmuch better is $5.50 film than $3, and ultimatly, whats the best to use, i heard fugicolor professional but its like $5.50-6 a roll, so what do you think i should do, im shooting color/ b+w
     
  2. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Kodak 400 or 800 ASA. Shop at Wal-Mart or similar places to get quanity for a decent price.
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    I would take a mix of low speed and high speed. I prefer Fuji for reversal (slide) film and Kodak film for negatives. Don't skimp on price, after all, how many times do you get to travel to Africa?
     
  4. 67olds442

    67olds442 uhhhh

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    Might want to look at BH, they will have a wider selection then wal mart (i hope! :p) and they have good prices.
    www.bhphotovideo.com
     
  5. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    400 and 800 in Africa?! :ugh:
     
  6. Brsboarder1

    Brsboarder1 New Member

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    i know what speeds im getting, mostly 100 speed, but, i wanna know what brand, and specifics to get, kodak portra? what?
     
  7. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    I normally use Fuji because the colour saturation tends to be higher.
     
  8. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Wildlife doesn't stop and pose for the camera. :ugh2:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2004
  9. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    50 speed film, on an overcast day, will allow you to shoot between f/4-2.8 at 1/250 sec. I would fill my camera bag with the slowest film (for finer grain and optimum f/stop) I could find plus a few rolls of 400 speed for twilight shooting. You really don't need anything faster than this.
     
  10. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    But 800? :ugh: You can shoot life animals for less than ISO800, and ISO400 is good for low light action shots. From your original post, it sounded like you suggested to only bring 400 and 800. I'd bring along 40% ISO100, 40% ISO200, and 20% ISO400.
     
  11. BLKDVLGSX

    BLKDVLGSX OT Supporter

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    This is why i love digital :o
     
  12. nitro

    nitro Guest

    I understand about the optium f/stop, but I find the 400 to be more versatile than 50. I rarely see the grain difference in still film nowadays. I suppose it's because I never go bigger than 5x7 prints.
     
  13. nitro

    nitro Guest

    ONLY? :ugh: I suggested 400/800 because that's what I usually bring.

    If you like to have little motion blur, then yes. I don't. When I travel, I like to have interior shots as well hence the 400. I absolutely loathe flash photography.
     
  14. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Why are you talking about your D70 which is a digital camera?
     
  15. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    I agree that 400 speed film is versatile, when I was a news photog years ago, Tri-x (asa 400) was all I ever shot. However, I was more interested in capturing news photos rather than making great shots of wildlife. If I were on a Safari, I would shoot the absolute slowest film I could use but that's just me. 400 speed film used outdoors is overkill plus you are forced to use a small f/stop which means you can't always blur the background.
     
  16. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    As I mentioned above, you can shoot 50 speed film in overcast conditions and still have a fast enough shutter speed that will freeze most action. Interior shots are normaly done using a tripod, so slower film isn't a problem. I can understand if you don't want to always carry a tripod, but all you're doing is compromising your shots by having to shoot fast film.

    Don't be afraid to use flash to brighten up interiors. It can make a dull photo come alive. Don't think that you have to use a flash as your main lighting source. Think of it as a fill light.
     
  17. Merli

    Merli gplus.to/merli OT Supporter

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    400/800 is what you usually bring to Africa? :rofl: :hsugh:

    I agree with 50/200/400 mix, and use the absolute slowest film you can for every shoot to minimize grain. Artistic grain doesn't belong in wildlife shots IMHO. I want sharp sharp sharp and nice bokeh, so choose your DOF carefully... You don't want to shoot too wide an aperture and have the head of the animal in focus and the fur blurred. That sucks ass.

    Also consider shooting slide film? Very nice colour saturation with Fuji Velvia that would look wonderful for wildlife at sunrise/sunset photos that you should be getting up early for.......... RIGHT??? :squint: ;)

    Best to bring too much than too little, you don't goto Africa every week, so make sure you have more than enough film :bigthumb:

    Don't forget to post up your good frames when you get back!! :big grin:
     
  18. nitro

    nitro Guest

    :cool:

    Don't most photographs use high speed film in conjunction with very long zoom lenses like the legendary Canon 400-600mm lenses for wildlife?

    I rarely use very slow film since K25 was discountined.
     
  19. nitro

    nitro Guest

    That is right, I normally don't like to carry tripods. That was when tripods were still bulky. Recently there are some tripods that I'd not mind carrying so that may make me go back to slower film. Slow film aren't common around here, or anywhere as of late which brings another inconvenience still.

    On to flash photography, I really don't like how the flash whiten objects. Even with weaker flash, I still can't appericate the shot.
     
  20. nitro

    nitro Guest

    :rofl: Not by a long shot, buddy. Don't bring digital in it.
     
  21. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Not to Africa, mang. I never said where. :squint:

    Like I said, I rarely see the grain difference in still film today. Motion picture film however is a different story altogether.

    Can I see some Fuji slide photos? I never tried Fuji slides, I stopped using slide film when K25 was pulled out of production.
     
  22. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    My longest lens is a 400mm f/5.6. This is NOT a fast lens however I can shoot ASA 100 speed film @ 1/250 sec @ f/8 all day long with it. I believe the Canon lenses are much faster than f/5.6 so to answer your question, no...you don't necessarily need fast film to shoot with telephoto lenses UNLESS you're shooting in twlight conditions or you really need to shoot at 1/1000 sec.
     
  23. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Where are you that you can't find slower film?? If you don't like to carry a tripod, you're limiting yourself to faster shutter speeds. Using slow shutters opens up a whole 'nother world of photography.

    If your flash "whitens objects" then you're overexposing your shot. Used correctly, flash should really fill in the shadows in daylight interior or exterior shots. Like I said earlier, think of flash as a fill light, not your main light. There are many ways that you can de-power a flash so it won't overexpose your shots.
     
  24. nitro

    nitro Guest

    My longest lens is only a 200mm, so it's safe to say I never had the opporunity to use super telephoto lenses. I suppose I was following generic suggestions. :o
     
  25. nitro

    nitro Guest

    Out in farm country. If I wanted slow speed film, I have to go to a camera speciality store, which is a 40 mile trip one way. In the nearest town, the slowest they stock is 200.

    Ok, ok. I'm convinced now.

    Keep the flash far away enough to only fill in?
     

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