What to use to remove paint overspray?

Discussion in 'That'll Buff Right Out' started by Ron Swanson, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. Ron Swanson

    Ron Swanson OT Supporter

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    I bought this jeep and the previous owner tried to paint the fender flares with them on the car. Ended up with overspray as I would expect.

    What can I do to remove this? Acetone? Compound and buffer?

    I dont know exactly what kind of paint it is but he said he bought it specifically for painting plastic fenders, so I assume whatever krylon plastic paint is made of it is similar.

    Thanks in advance!

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  2. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    A paint polish should work. You can't just wipe it on the paint like a wax, you have to work it in.
     
  3. Ron Swanson

    Ron Swanson OT Supporter

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    Any suggestion on a brand I could find locally at AutoZone/Advanced Auto/Walmart?

    Can I work it in by hand, or am I better off using the 7" variable speed polisher I have?

    Also, if thats not abrasive enough to remove it, what would be the logical next step?

    Thanks again...
     
  4. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    If you're just working with what you can get locally, I'd go with something along the lines of Meguiar's Ultimate Compound; it's as aggressive as you'll find in a locally available polish/compound at the parts store.

    You can work it by hand, but what sort of 7" variable speed polisher do you have? One of the cheap-o parts store buffers? If so it's not really powerful enough to do anything. Using your own elbow grease would probably be more effective.
     
  5. Labster

    Labster OT Supporter

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    A medium to aggressive grade clay might be able to get a majority of it off there as well.
     
  6. Ron Swanson

    Ron Swanson OT Supporter

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    would this work?

    http://www.mothers.com/02_products/07240.html

    I have this already, but it doesnt sound aggressive enough.

    http://www.turtlewax.com/main.taf?p=2,1,1,4

    After doing a bunch of reading, it seems the clar bar is my best chance at removing the paint and I could use it all over the vehicle to clean the paint well before a polish and wax.

    Thoughts?
     
  7. quamen

    quamen New Member

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    not trying to bash anyone comments, but I have been detailing for over 10 years and i wouldn't even bother trying to polish or clay that out. Get some paint reducer to remove, and then follow up with the polishing and protecting portion. Plus if you try to clay that area, from the picture there looks to be like a groove, or edge where the flares where. The clay is going to get all crapped up, and you will have a pita trying to remove from the crack.
     
  8. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    Based on the fact that is most likely cheap rattle can spray paint, a polish should easily remove it. Paint reducer would probably work the best if the paint overspray was fresh. It doesn't seem to work as well (at least for me) on older paint.
     

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