A&P what starting things?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by lemans23, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    it appears that video rules apply to photography rules. im a hardcore vid guy, and i was just browsing this forum and i was amazed at what a still camera can do. it looks like its just as powerful as a video cam in different respects. what i'm wondering is what is a good starting camera? good quality, nothin outrageous, like i would want a eos1d to start (my friend has one and its insane) like under 500. post some pics taken with the camera. is there anything i should know about still photography that isnt covered in videography? thanks alot!
     
  2. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    won't find even a used 1d for under $2k. Best bet would be a D30, D60 10D, or 300D.

    There are many things that are similar between video and still, but just as many things are different. Best bet would be to pick up a 35mm basic book. Same rules apply from film to digital
     
  3. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    no what i'm implying is that i dont want a top of the line, just good quality under 500. what i was meaning was u guys are still photo buffs and i didnt want u to rec me a high end cam aka 1d.
     
  4. foodle

    foodle New Member

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    Do you want a point and shoot or a DSLR? You can't do much with $500 for a DSLR + lens. For a point and shoot the Canon G6/G5/G3 line is nice. Also the Olympus 8080 or a used E10 or E20. A used Sony 717 should be cheap now, but it's an awesome camera.
     
  5. sony

    sony Active Member

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    D30 + 50mm f/1.8. Its not that great tho.
     
  6. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    The biggest difference you'll find between video and still digital cameras is the use of shutter speeds. As a videographer you're use to shooting around 1/60 sec and maybe changing shutter speeds for special effects. With a still camera you'll have a wider range of shutter speeds, from 1 second or slower to 1/1000 or faster. You can use shutter speed to blur or freeze action and control your f/stop for creative depth of field.

    The other major difference is that you can have a much wider range of lenses to chose from. Videographers are often stuck with using one zoom lens. You can purchase a lot of different lenses, from extreme wide angles to long telephoto lenses for your still camera. These lenses are a lot cheaper than the standard zoom lenses for video cameras.

    Finally, if you chose to buy a 35mm film camera instead of a DLSR, you'll open up a whole world of film choices.
     
  7. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    i really wanted digi so i could up load it easy. so just look at some used cams or point and shooters? im looking at the rebel ti 35mm. is this a decent camera? how do u develop pics like these. sry, im an extreme noob at still photography. is there like white balance and everything from videography?
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2004
  8. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    recommend me some good 35mm cams to start with? preferably slr.
     
  9. foodle

    foodle New Member

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    You'll want a film SLR in whatever lens system you're going to stick with for your transition to DSLRs. Right now Canon and Nikon are the big players, with Canon being ahead in technology. For a film SLR body, just make sure you get a body that will give you full control over all shooting vairables and doesn't restrict you to any BS programmed modes.

    Luckily film SLRs are really cheap right now, since everyone's moving to DSLRs and selling off their film gear. For Canon EOS gear, I'd recommend a new Elan 7E or a used EOS 3. If you want to go Nikon, both the N80 and N75 are decent. Look at KEH.com for some decent deals on used gear if you don't want to use ebay.
     
  10. foodle

    foodle New Member

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    For film shooting, most of the whitebalance gets take care of by the lab. You can get more control over it by picking the right kind of film for the light you'll be shooting in and/or using filters. For digital, the whitebalance is handled by you, so you have to make sure to set the WB to the right pre-set for the light you'll be shooting in or set a custom WB.
     
  11. MrBucket

    MrBucket OT Supporter

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    Couldnt be more wrong. Used 1D have gone for as low as $1300 recently. I see them going regularly for $1600-1800 on www.fredmiranda.com
     
  12. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    If they're that low in price, that means that they're very high in aucutations or have physical abuse.
     
  13. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    For film, you buy the type of film for the type of lighting. They have tungsten balanced, daylight balanced etc. If you buy daylight film and use it in a studio, you'll have a yellow picture. If you use tungsten film outside you'll have a very blue picture. They have color correcting filters for this or gels to put over lighting sources. Getting the correct film is of course he best idea.

    With film you need to do a lot of pre-production. In digital you can hit a button to quickly change iso's for variable lighting. With film, you need to know ahead of time what the lighting will be like and buy the right kind of film. If you only have iso 100 film and are shooting indoor sports, you could push the film in camera to 400 or even 800 and then correct for it in deveoping, but it'll cost a fortune and you're contrast will be way off.


    Working with slide film is very fun. You have to have your exposures right on or a little under, and you can get incredible resutls. Try some Fuji Provia or Velvia and you're jaw will drop at the colors.
     
  14. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    is the rebel film line any good? i mean the rebel ti and the rebel t2. how long does it take to develop film? do i have to use a lab? or can i do something else? whats the easiest way?
     
  15. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    they're ok, but I'd atleast look into the Elan line, its a big improvement. Better built body, more shutter life, faster response, more frames/sec, more custom functions, and the mirror is better insulated to reduce internal vibrations that can cause camera shake.

    Don't be affraid of used film bodies, just have them inspected, costs like $5-10. Not a whole lot can be really off on a used camera. A used EOS 3 or a used EOS 1 or 1N can often be had for the price of a new Rebel or Elan. Working in 1/3 stops insted of 1/2 that the Rebel and Elan do is great, as is having PC terminals for off camera flashes etc
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2004
  16. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    hey viperx27, do u have a sn on AIM? if ya do, tell me what it is. i'm Perpetual Vizion. im me cause i have some questions that would take forever on a forum. beside that, can anyone show me some links to proper or appropriate film? thanks.
     
  17. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    better yet, is there like a book/magazine/website that has like vocabulary that i should learn and/or tutorials and/or a camera buying guide?
     
  18. sony

    sony Active Member

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    If you're looking to pick up a film body, go for the Elan7. They're cheap and pretty good in terms of features/build. :wiggle:
     
  19. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    what else do i need if i just get the body?
     
  20. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    what i meant to ask, is will it be cheaper if i buy the kit, or get the body and my own lens?
     
  21. reinvent4

    reinvent4 Guest

    depends on what type of lens you want
     
  22. lemans23

    lemans23 PV - The Vision of Sound

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    thats the point bro. i dont know anything about still lenses. what is good to start with? i want to eventually do macro shots, but right now, whats good? the kid for the elan is like 409. the body is 299. that leaves me 110 bucks to get me a lens. what should i get?
     

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