A&P What kind of setup would I need to digitize art?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by ihaveanevilplan, Dec 25, 2008.

  1. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    IE take large artwork and turn them into digital format so I can make high quality prints (up to say.. 17"x22")

    SLR + tripod + lights with those white diffuser things over them?

    or is there a better way?

    Thanks!
     
  2. pawis

    pawis werd em up

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Messages:
    423
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sin City
    you seem to have the right idea. just try to keep the lighting even on the art. a diffuser on a flash can still have light fall off and provide uneven lighting. if you have something(just a simple room light) that provides even lighting but isnt so bright, with the tripod you can just do a lengthier exposure and make sure you shoot raw to adjust any white balance.
     
  3. bitchno3

    bitchno3 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,441
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    78701
    what size artwork, you can probably take it into some sort of print shop and get them to scan it for you
     
  4. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    not sure...i plan on doing it for my friend who's an artist so the pieces vary greatly in size

    what's the biggest you can scan?
     
  5. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    so brighter isnt better? in my head i was imagining two stands of studio lights or somethign
     
  6. pawis

    pawis werd em up

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Messages:
    423
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sin City
    bright is fine, i was just thinking you might end up having two really bright lights really close on both sides of the piece and you would usually end up with the sides being much brighter than the center of the piece.

    just dont have the lights close to the subject as the range of light drop off is much greater the closer it is.
     
  7. quid

    quid I Piss Excellence OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2004
    Messages:
    50,352
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    california
    big scans are done through rollers in my experience. so if youre talking about paintings thats a no go. but otherwise the ones ive seen were ~36" wide and since its roll fed it can be 11ty" long.
     
  8. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    thanks for the help guys

    also, how many megapixels should i be looking at for something that size (17x22")
     
  9. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
  10. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    17,726
    Likes Received:
    51
    as many as you can afford.

    turning artwork into reprintable digital forms has a professional name: glicee.

    two light sources 45 degrees on either side of the image with a camera in the middle.

    diffusion is a must, reflections are bad. lights must be same height as artwork.
     
  11. Bloke

    Bloke Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2003
    Messages:
    26,775
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pekin, IL
    i wish you were closer, im already setup to do this kind of work. :hs:
     
  12. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    thanks! sounds pretty straight forward
     
  13. ihaveanevilplan

    ihaveanevilplan Everybody wake up, wake up, it's time to get down Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    109,547
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    :) this is why i love OT
     
  14. Tensai81

    Tensai81 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Messages:
    20,620
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Beautiful South Orlaaaaaaando
    didn't jcolman do something like this for his side project for old baseball cards? :dunno: I'm to lazy to go look

    edit: ah, the setup pics are already down: http://forums.offtopic.com/showthread.php?t=4045539

    I would PM him and see what setup he had, should work for your application
     
  15. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    Pretty much right on. However I don't understand this comment: "lights must be same height as artwork." In every copy stand I've ever seen/worked with, the lights will be higher than the artwork. Imagine drawing a 45 degree up angle from the center of the artwork. You can place your lights anywhere along that line and get the desired results.
     
  16. HighTachPres

    HighTachPres New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    11,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    it's key to have a light meter for digitizing art.... well if you're doing it 100% oxford book right.
    Make sure light is even throughout the entire piece of art
    good luck!
     
  17. HighTachPres

    HighTachPres New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Messages:
    11,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    also be sure to shoot at no less than 75mm to ensure the image isn't distorted
     
  18. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    50mm will do the job just fine.
     
  19. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    it's also a good idea to shoot a reference color chart to insure proper reproduction.
     
  20. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    17,726
    Likes Received:
    51
    The reason for the same height is to prevent downward shadows on thick textured pieces of art, like impasto paintings and such.

    I guess with a photo it doesn't matter much, but the only copy stands we have at school are in the painting studio, and they're always the same height for that reason.

    :dunno:
     
  21. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    Unless I missunderstand you, if the lights were the same height, they would cast shadows across the painting's surface?
     
  22. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    17,726
    Likes Received:
    51

    isn't that why there are 2 diffused light sources coming from equal and opposite directions? to cancel out each others shadows? If one was casting shadows to the right, the other would then fill in that shadow, no? If the lights were above, there would be no light to fill in the shadows being cast downward.

    I've never shot the stuff, I just asked a professor who happened to be standing next to the setup when I saw the thread... I'm sure you know more about this than I do. I'm more curious than anything now...
     
  23. Bloke

    Bloke Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2003
    Messages:
    26,775
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pekin, IL
    i figure that 2 lights spaced evenly would just make a more even light thats posible with a single light, no matter the placement. i dont think shadows are any concern, only even fill.

    i would go for non strobes, would be a lot simpler and easier.
     
  24. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    If you place your lights at 45 degree angles to each other, the light will fill the shadows equally. But more importantly, by raising the lights a bit on each side, you minimize any shadows while insuring that you don't get reflections. However, I'm basing this on my experience with animation stands and commercial copy stands designed for flat art, not paintings. Your point is certainly valid. It's just that I've never seen a copy stand where the lights were the same height.
     
  25. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,114
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    east coast
    actually strobes are very easy to use. They also don't put out the heat of continious lights, which is important in shooting artwork.
     

Share This Page