What kind of server would I need for a fairly large MySQL database?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by TheDarkHorizon, Nov 21, 2003.

  1. TheDarkHorizon

    TheDarkHorizon \xC0\xFF\xEE

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    I am going to design a database which will hold approximately 10,000 products, and the database will continue to grow. It is for an e-commerce site, and I will be creating dynamic sites with PHP, accessing the database to display the appropriate products. The site averages ~1000 hits a day. I'm probably going to look for a dedicated server, so I want to know how what kind of server I'll be needing. Would a P4 2GHz + 512MB DDR266 be sufficient?
     
  2. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    i'd actually go with a gig of memory... just because it's a database box, and DBMS's naturally use a lot of memory.
     
  3. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    Yeah, you can never have enough memory - RAM or disk.

    I believe (and anyone correct me if I'm wrong), but MySQL loves fast hard drive setups. I've seen some of the algorithm discussions on mysql.com and it appears for the searches MySQL is very efficient and dependant on hard drive access times. But besides that, what you have should be fine.

    I've got a MySQL database with 5 million records on a P3 700 with 256mb of RAM. It only gets about 16,000 hits a month, but runs very well (just remember you have to optimize your scripts and queries).
     
  4. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    My advice would be a nice SCSI setup (RAID 5 if you can), 1 GB of RAM and a server CPU for the cache. :big grin:
     
  5. TheDarkHorizon

    TheDarkHorizon \xC0\xFF\xEE

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    That's the only website I will be hosting though. Would that small site actually need that much?
     
  6. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    Well you said you would be creating more websites. You just need to ask yourself how important this site is to you. Based on that (and your budget of course), build a server around your requirements. If you want uptime, go with a RAID 5 setup with SCSI and failover (cluster if we're talking about a large amount of income from this site) if possible. If it's performance, SCSI and a boat load of RAM.

    Using SCSI setup is a pretty good idea for a database/web server. Doing a RAID 5 setup would be smart depending on what kind of uptime you're looking for. I'd say the CPU isn't the most important of the 3 components. So, I would say the importance would be drive setup, RAM, and CPU.
     
  7. TheDarkHorizon

    TheDarkHorizon \xC0\xFF\xEE

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    I'd like to use a SCSI on RAID 5 setup, but I'm not too sure about the budget yet. What I meant was that the database would be expanded with more products in the future, I don't have any plans on adding anymore websites to the dedicated server. When you said CPU is the least important, would it matter if I got a Celeron instead of a Pentium 4? I probably wouldn't get a Xeon since it's only going to be one website. I know the Pentium 4's have more cache; would that be very important for me?
     
  8. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    I would stick with the P4 over the Celeron.
     
  9. TheDarkHorizon

    TheDarkHorizon \xC0\xFF\xEE

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    I've decided that I'm probably going to begin with:

    Pentium 4 2.4GHz
    512MB RAM
    40GB (8MB Cache)

    I could always add 512MB RAM later, so I'll just stick with 512MB for now.

    Now, how does Windows 2000 compare with Linux for a web/database server? I'm more comfortable with Linux, but there will be other people working on it, and they don't have experience with Linux.
     
  10. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    A PHP/MySQL setup would probably (I have no proof) run better on a Linux system. However, if you really need other people on the system somewhat regularly, you might want to consider Windows. Also, if you go with Windows, go with 2003 over 2000. We've upgraded all of our old 2000 servers to 2003 with no issues.
     
  11. TheDarkHorizon

    TheDarkHorizon \xC0\xFF\xEE

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    What advantages would I see from Windows 2003 over 2000?
     
  12. CompiledMonkey

    CompiledMonkey New Member

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    I really never knew much anything 2000, so I wouldn't be the best to compare. I would check the Windows Server site. I'm sure you'll find a nice chart giving you what you want.

    Our NA (I'm a NetTech) has said it's just as stable and performs as well as 2000, if not better. Seeing as it's at least as good is reason enough to use it over 2000.
     
  13. TheDarkHorizon

    TheDarkHorizon \xC0\xFF\xEE

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    Alright, thanks for the help. I'll pitch the idea and see what happens from there. :x: The current server is seriously a POS.
     
  14. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    I'd go Linux - you can toss phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL from the browser which even your Windows driven folks could figure out. I'm not sure what other admin duties they might need, but there's probably an open source app that will do the job just fine.
     
  15. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    :werd: I wouldn't even screw with windows at all... it would actually cost you some money, and if you're already more familiar with linux, the it's a win-win situation. You will find that MySQL will also perform much better on a linux box
     

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