What kind of certs are out there for personal training?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Satellite, Oct 6, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Satellite

    Satellite Guest

    I would love to work as a strength and conditioning coach for the NFL. (Pipedream I know, Just curious really)

    But what kind of certs etc would you go after to do this?
     
  2. GTLifter

    GTLifter Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    62,453
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Durty Durty ATL Niggah
  3. NUDES

    NUDES New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    15,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you are really curious, probably the following:

    BS in Exercise Science
    MS in Exercise Science
    CSCS (requires Bachelors to take)
    Experience as an athlete yourself, college at least
    Experience coaching athletes
    Knowledge of various training philosophies including eastern block countries
    Know someone
    Suck someone
     
  4. Blade

    Blade Time to swolercize

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    14,736
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Murfreesboro, TN Rep: ★
    I hear USC might have an opening soon.
     
  5. NUDES

    NUDES New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    15,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    But to just coach basic athletes, you'd need a CSCS. CSCS requires a bachelors (doesn't matter what kind of bachelors). Decently hard test.. much harder than any of the PT certs. CSCS is not a PT cert. IT's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.
     
  6. Satellite

    Satellite Guest


    Thank you for being honest. And not a dick. I was only asking out of curiosity.
     
  7. Satellite

    Satellite Guest



    Only one guy on the Packers has his Masters. And his undergrad was in Spanish.:mamoru:

    I played college football. I have coached High School Level. Umpire/Referee with IHSA.

    I don't actually think I would ever be able to do this. Like I said in the first post.
     
  8. NUDES

    NUDES New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    15,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Its a very hard field to break into. I've considered it thoroughly. I know guys that do it. I know a guy that trains a buncha HS athletes (in a rich city) in a crossfit gym. He makes pretty good cash.. but his schedule is literally dedicated everyday to the athletes. IT's not a 9-5.

    The MONEY is in coaching LARGE groups of athletes all at once. One on one training is not really where it's at. Being independent is where its' at.

    Thats why PT's mostly make nothing.. because they do 1 on 1 training (less $ potential) and then on top of that they pay out the ass to the gym they work for.
     
  9. Satellite

    Satellite Guest



    Yeah, I have trained at Don Beebe's House of Speed and can attest that training large groups is better money wise.
     
  10. <Mark>

    <Mark> A flute without holes, is not a flute. A donut wit

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2001
    Messages:
    8,961
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    On the course.
    It can be a hard field to break into, if you don't go about it the right way. Ive been interning for the last 2.5 yrs with the teams on campus and am currently going for my masters now. In this field its all about the experience. The more experience you have when you go to look for your first job the better off you will be. Having a masters is starting to become a prerequisite also. Look at any of the job postings for strength coaches, almost all of them ( and any that are worth a shit ) want a masters and at least 1-2 years of hands on experience.

    If you have the time to devote to it, then its definitely worth it. I put in close to 40 hrs a week doing it, and that doesn't include my class schedule, work or doing my hw. Oh and you don't necessarily have to have been a collegiate level athlete. ;) I wasn't, but that hasn't stopped me from working at it. You do however have to know and learn to be pretty good at coaching and performing the olympic lifts.
     
  11. deadbolt

    deadbolt New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Messages:
    21,374
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern California
    mike burgener?
     
  12. NUDES

    NUDES New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    15,195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, you don't have to be.. but coaching athletics has also become a game of what you actually did with yourself. It happens, but more and more colleges are looking for guys who are actually STRONG themselves. At least that's what I've seen. I've seen guys w/o masters get hired over guys that have it because they have been able to directly apply their knowledge to themselves. IMO no athlete wants to be coached by some dickhead who can't squat 405 or bench 315 unless he's 130 pounds. With athletes, "street cred" to to speak seems to go a LONG way. I watch D1 athletes get trained and their #1 thing is that the guy training them has been there and done that... which is understandable. If some guy came up to me and said man, I'm going to make you the strongest and fastest football player out there.. and then he was some pipsqueak with a MS and CSCS but can't do shit with weights himself.. I'd be like... UHHHHHHHHHHH
     
  13. Mass

    Mass Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Messages:
    8,749
    Likes Received:
    1
    i see what you did thar.
     
  14. RICK RO$$

    RICK RO$$ Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2007
    Messages:
    15,870
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    I don't bop I do the money dance
    Word, a buddy of mine has no formal certification whatsoever but he played D1 football but left before graduating to play arena football. He also benches mid 5's raw which looks impressive to pretty much anyone.

    Now he works with the team here as an assistant trainer/coach but also does personal training for a shitload of college athletes, a couple of NFL rookies before the season started, etc. Makes pretty decent money to not have any kind of formal degree or PT cert. Even though he runs them through pretty much the same generic shit as any other coach anywhere, he has a good client base to work with because of his position and the fact that he's actually "been there" and is strong himself.

    Its all about connections (and being black probably helps too).
     
  15. <Mark>

    <Mark> A flute without holes, is not a flute. A donut wit

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2001
    Messages:
    8,961
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    On the course.
    Oh sure, you have to practice what you preach. If you can't do it yourself then you have no business coaching it. But my point is that not being a former athlete doesn't necessarily preclude someone from coaching. Maybe I'm lucky, but all the d1 athletes Ive worked with have been receptive to the help and haven't had that macho mentality. :dunno:
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page