A&P What film to buy?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Mippity, Aug 12, 2003.

  1. Mippity

    Mippity New Member

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    Just did a "buy it now" on a NIkon FM10 on ebay. :eek3:
    I will probably be taking a fair amount of pictures and what kind of film should I buy?What speed and does brand really matter?
    What is the cheapest way to get them developed?
    Should I buy bulk off ebay?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

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    fuji velvia :big grin:

    speed depends on application.. i haven't tried the velvia 100 yet, but from what my friends have been saying, they like it alot better than the provia 100... I've been using velvia 50 and provia 400 mainly lately (got a bunch free)

    brand matters again, depending on what you shoot

    find a good minilab that does inhouse e6 and are friendly, ask about possible discounts (student, certian orginzations, etc)

    don't buy bulk off of ebay, you never know how they're handled... for all you know the person you're buying from has had boxes of film sitting outside in the heat... that and alot of places refridgerate their slide film and in transport, condensation builds up
     
  3. Mippity

    Mippity New Member

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    I'm looking to go cheap :p!!
    Is this velvia film relatively cheap?
     
  4. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Don't go cheap on film. Why spend all the effort to shoot a photo if you don't care about the quality of the film? Besides, film costs aren't that expensive when you consider all the other expenses of photography.

    What type of film you shoot depends on subject matter, how the final photo is to be used, lighting conditions and size of final print.

    Use reversal (slide) film if you intend to sell your photos to magazines. Use negative if you intend to make prints up to 8x10. Use the slowest film you can for the given lighting conditions if you want overall sharpness. Use the fastest film you can find if you want a lot of grain.

    Personally, I've always favored Kodak and Fuji films, however expermenting with other brands can lead to some interesting pictures. Shoot the same subject with two or three different speeds/brands/types of film and compare the results.

    Cheers
    Jim
     
  5. Mippity

    Mippity New Member

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    Why go cheap on film?
    Well I'm a college student who is just starting back school this week :eek3:
    I don't want to spend $4 a roll!!!
    Guess I'll just try to buy the big packs of film :)
     
  6. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    If you plan on shooting a lot of film you might want to buy a bulk loader and load your own film. I use to buy 100' rolls of film from Kodak and load my own. A bulk loader isn't all that expensive (at least it wasn't 30 years ago) and you can really save a lot of money by buying film in bulk.

    Jim
     
  7. Kinks

    Kinks Sup. OT Supporter

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    If you're not taking holyshitwow shots just yet or planning enlargements then ISO400 negative film will be fine. It's cheap, any mini lab can process it and it gives good results. When you start getting better then use ISO100 negative film, or move to slide film if you plan to display it or get it professionally scanned, or you want to sell to a newspaper/magazine. I would take slides if I wanted to have prints made but it would be ISO100 or slower and I would only have 1 or 2 enlargements made.

    Cliff notes, 35mm film is cheap if you're still learning. Start with 400 speed and then when your compositions improve try other film types.
     
  8. Mippity

    Mippity New Member

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    omgosh thanks to you.
    Film is a lot cheaper than i expected.
    The last time I priced it was a few years back when I went to walgreens(small expensive department store) and they wanted liek 4 dollars per roll!
     
  9. MastaCow

    MastaCow I love cup.

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    I usually buy the import fuji from b&h, like $1.39 a roll for 36 exposures for my Lomo.

    I've been using 160 and 400 iso Kodak Portra VC medium format in the Rollei lately-i'm pretty happy w the results.
     
  10. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

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    speaking of negatives... has anyone tried the kocak UC yet?

    my friend who hooked me up with my film also had a few rolls of it but my other friend wanted it and since he has the hots for her.... well you can figure out who got to shoot with it...
     
  11. MastaCow

    MastaCow I love cup.

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    Haven't tried it yet, I'm thinking about trying a pro-pack of it next time I stop by A&I. The VC is pretty saturated for me as is, I'm kind of afraid of what the UC might look like.
     
  12. barnold999

    barnold999 New Member

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    As far as speed on films... it REALLY depends on what kind of light you are in and what kind of control...
    the lower the iso, also called asa, (such as 50) will have really low noise... but 1600 will have quite a bit, but the higher the ISO the more sensitive it is to light, so if you are taking night photos without flash, then ISO 800 is always nice... but during the daytime I would NEVER shoot with 800... way too much noise and way too sensitive to light... if you want a slow shutter speed you are screwed.

    But, brandwise, I usually buy whatever. Well I dont buy film anymore I have a digitial SLR, EOS-10d...
     

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