What can I do with my NForce4/Athlon 64 system?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by ZCP M3, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    I've decided to make a NAS and was planning on using my old Athlon 64 system. Problem is the NForce 4 chipset is no longer supported by Nvidia so Windows 7 or Server 2008 isn't gonna work and my RocketRAID 3520 card isn't supported by FreeNAS. :(

    Is there anything useful that I can do with this system?
     
  2. Wolf68k

    Wolf68k OT Supporter

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  3. andymodem

    andymodem Ambitious, but rubbish.

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    How about building a Windows Home Server?
     
  4. Shizzle

    Shizzle New Member

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    For just a NAS, Why not just use server 2003, or XP, or whatever supports the hardware?
     
  5. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    I'll probably give Server '03 a shot. I'm assuming the drivers are similar to XP x64?

    Getting the software through MSDNAA, which should I use? Server 2003 Web, Standard, or Enterprise?
     
  6. Shizzle

    Shizzle New Member

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    Not sure on that one, I run ubuntu on my home server. I would guess standard would be fine though, since you probably won't need a web/ftp/dns/etc server.
     
  7. CrazyInteg

    CrazyInteg Honda-Acura.net OG

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    Don't use an old computer as a NAS. It consumes way too much power.

    Let's say it consumes 120 watts and your electricity is reasonable at 10 cents a kW hour.

    ((120 * 24) / 1000) * 365 * .10 = $105.12 a year to run your NAS
     
  8. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    Right now my main PC is a Intel Mac Pro with a 1Kw power supply inside and this NAS will be rocking 8-12 hard drives when I'm finished. I don't think the energy saved by switching from an A64 system to something like a Core 2 Duo will be appreciated. :o
     
  9. CrazyInteg

    CrazyInteg Honda-Acura.net OG

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    Should have put this info in your first post. Is this a data center backup server or something? I take it this is not for home use.
     
  10. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    It's for home use but more of an enterprise solution I guess. RAID 5 (eventually going to be a 6 + hot spare) for storing all my movies, tv shows, and 12MP RAW camera files.

    But it might have gave up the ghost last night trying to install Server 03. Getting nothing but POST memory error beeps and it's not worth spending $150 on to resurrect. :o
     
  11. dissonance

    dissonance reset OT Supporter

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    I'd consider rethinking the RAID-6 idea for the simple reason of upgradability. I'm currently in the process of switching from:

    Current:
    LSI MegaRAID 8408E (I think that's the model number)
    Physical Group 01: 5 1TB drives
    Hot Spare: 1 1TB drive

    Own and need to install to replace current:
    Adaptec 51645
    Physical Group 01: 5 2TB drives
    Physical Group 02: 5 1TB drives
    Hot Spare: 1 2TB drive

    and then when that gets full, I'll add another physical group of 5 2TB drives. Then when that's full, I'll replace the 1TB drives with 2TB drives. In the end, I'll have 15+1 2TB drives split into 3 physical groups. I originally was planning to run a RAID-6, but changed my mind as I'd want larger disk pools, probably all 15 drives in a single disk group. Then, I could only have 2 fail at a time and would only lose 2 drive capacities. With the RAID-5 though, I can have 3 disks fail but lose 3 drive capacities. Plus, each physical group gets its own hot swap bay.... and I've had bad luck with my Seagate ES.2 1TB drives. Over the course of about a year I've had 4 of the 6 die. Mind you also, that this computer isn't on all the time either.

    btw, this is all in a Lian Li PC-A77B with 2x SuperMicro CSE-M35T-1B 5in3 bays (will need a 3rd bay when I add the next disk group)... home use as well, not really a NAS but my main PC that has the RAID shared over the network and slight FTP traffic for family backups.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  12. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    Well right now this is what's inside my Mac Pro:
    RocketRAID 3520 (PCI-e x8, Intel IOP341, 256MB DDR2 cache, 2 mini-SAS cables into 8 SATA ports)
    4 1.5TB 7200.11 drives in a RAID 5, no hotspare.

    I've got a Lian-Li PC-V2100 case :)drool: :wackit:) that I'm gonna throw this all into because the Mac Pro only has 4 drive bays. I'm going to preserve the RAID 5 and just add a hotspare for now. No idea what I'll end up doing but eventually I'll upgrade to an Areca card that can handle 16 drives and do something crazy awesome with hotswap bays in the front.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010

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