MIL well, LT Murphy got the Medal

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by clever_username, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. clever_username

    clever_username Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,954
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    WASHINGTON - The first Medal of Honor awarded for combat in Afghanistan will be presented to the family of a Navy SEAL from Long Island, who gave his life to make a radio call for help for his team.

    President Bush was to present the nation's highest military honor for valor on Monday to the family of Lt. Michael Murphy of Patchogue, N.Y.

    "There's a lot of awards in the military, but when you see a Medal of Honor, you know whatever they went through is pretty horrible. You don't congratulate anyone when you see it," said Marcus Luttrell, the lone member of Murphy's team to survive the firefight with the Taliban.

    Murphy, Luttrell and two other SEALs were searching for a terrorist in the Afghan mountains on June 28, 2005, when their mission was compromised after they were spotted by locals, who presumably alerted the Taliban to their presence.

    An intense gun battle ensued, with more than 50 anti-coalition fighters swarming around the outnumbered SEALs.

    Although wounded, Murphy is credited with risking his own life by moving into the open for a better position to transmit a call for help.

    Still under fire, Murphy provided his unit's location and the size of the enemy force. At one point he was shot in the back, causing him to drop the transmitter. Murphy picked it back up, completed the call and continued firing at the enemy who was closing in.

    He then returned to his cover position with his men and continued the battle. A U.S. helicopter sent to rescue the men was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, killing all 16 aboard.

    By the end of the two-hour gunfight, Murphy and two of his comrades were also dead. An estimated 35 Taliban were also killed. Luttrell was blown over a ridge and knocked unconscious. He escaped, and was protected by local villagers for several days before he was rescued.

    "We look at these guys and say, 'What heroes,'" said Murphy's father, Dan Murphy. "These guys look at themselves and say, 'I'm just doing my job.' That's an understatement, but that's the way they view it, and that was Michael's whole life."

    Murphy, who died before his 30th birthday, is the fourth Navy SEAL to earn the award and the first since the Vietnam War. Two Medals of Honor have been awarded posthumously in the Iraq war: to Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham, who was killed in 2004 after covering a grenade with his helmet, and to Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. Smith, who was killed in 2003 after holding off Iraqi forces with a machine gun before he was killed at the Baghdad airport.

    Murphy's heroics have been widely recognized on Long Island, where he graduated in 1994 from Patchogue-Medford High School.

    To his fellow SEALs, he was known as "Murph," but as a child, his parents nicknamed him "The Protector," because of his strong moral compass. After the 2001 terror attacks, that compass eventually led him to Afghanistan, where he wore a patch of the New York City Fire Department on his uniform.

    "He took his deployment personally. He was going after, and his team was going after, the men who planned, plotted against and attacked not only the United States, but the city he loved, New York," said his father. "He knew what he was fighting for."
     
  2. MumblingJoe169

    MumblingJoe169 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2002
    Messages:
    10,318
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Baltimore
    about time, this is gonna be really big over on crossfit.com
     
  3. jmx2323

    jmx2323 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2002
    Messages:
    53,459
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Centennial, CO
    Yeah I read about that last week, guy was everything an officer should be from what I read.
     
  4. thesuperlurker

    thesuperlurker yes i know i have few posts... you arent the first

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,589
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm glad he got it. I don't think they give enough of these out. It's almost like you have to die to get it now which I think is unfortunate. I think Sergeant Major Kasal should have been awarded one as well.
     
  5. whitecouch

    whitecouch spendin' our golden years in OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Messages:
    3,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mattersville
    Its like the quotes story says, you have to go through something pretty horrible to get one. I don't think it should be given out often nor do I think it should have to be given out often.
     
  6. thesuperlurker

    thesuperlurker yes i know i have few posts... you arent the first

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,589
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would say this is pretty horrible http://www.usmc.mil/marinelink/mcn2000.nsf/main5/9F8D86E63B0528DA85257163007F862D?opendocument

    Shot seven times with AK47, used his body to shield his Marine froma grenade blast, lost 60% of his blood. I'm just saying there are so many extraordinary stories where the only thing that didn't happen was a death. The MOH is being given out more scarcely than ever and I think that is a shame.
     
  7. whitecouch

    whitecouch spendin' our golden years in OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Messages:
    3,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mattersville
    I'll admit, I see similar stories given less than the medal of honor a lot. I guess the incident doesn't raise the same emotion that the Lt. Murphy incident. Sgt Kasal should have died and put his life on the line well beyond the point where most men would have stopped. Who knows, these decisions are well above my pay grade.
     
  8. thesuperlurker

    thesuperlurker yes i know i have few posts... you arent the first

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,589
    Likes Received:
    0
    Agreed. I'm glad we don't just hand them out easily like during the Civil War, but there are a lot of deserving people out there. I think it jsut gets harder and harder with time, since we have heard similar stories before so they somehow appear less incredible when someone else does basically the same thing.
     
  9. scottiemac

    scottiemac It's time to shoot some hot dogs!

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Messages:
    8,889
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NWPA
    Doesn't your Chain of Command have to put in a package for it?
     
  10. effwhy_sea

    effwhy_sea New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2007
    Messages:
    4,766
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ

    should check out the book " my men are my heroes - the brad kassal story"
     
  11. evan2

    evan2 Guest

    Long island in the house.
     
  12. TRN

    TRN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    55,145
    Likes Received:
    135
    Location:
    North East
    :bowdown:

    Excellent
     
  13. clever_username

    clever_username Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,954
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Oklahoma City

    yeah, someone in the chain of command gives the nod, followed by approval up the chain. a member of congress can also nominate someone. a formal investigation is conducted, i think they need at least two witnesses of the act in question, they'd be interviewed to get the story. if it can verified, the soldier/sailor/airman/marine is awarded the Medal.

    i'd like to see this picture of sgt maj kasal.

    edit: n/m, i googled it. christ, that's one tough marine. give him the fucking Medal!
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2007
  14. whitecouch

    whitecouch spendin' our golden years in OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Messages:
    3,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mattersville
    A lot of things were different in the past. ... Could have said a lot more here but it's better left alone.
     

Share This Page