want to learn linux, where do i begin?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by s2k, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. s2k

    s2k OT Supporter

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    i downloaded ubuntu and is in the process of installing, so far so good...but it seems pretty straight forward...gui point click type thing....i know there are more to it than that...so need some pointer to what i need to learn to be able to apply it to my future IT jobs
     
  2. Reclaimer

    Reclaimer I said I know it's only rock 'n roll but I like it

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    im no os expert, but i found that ubuntu is one of the eaisiest of the linux based operating systems to install and run like windows. i found it a pain in the ass to install java...but once you give it a try, its not bad. i actually borrowed a linux for dummies book from a friend of mine, that helped me out a bit.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Hmm...there's not much you need to learn nowadays, at least not for basic workstation-building and server-building. In the more user-friendly distributions (like Ubuntu), all of the stuff like installing programs and changing settings is either automated or is done through easy graphical controls, and unless you should need to build a highly-specialized system there would be no pressing need to use any of the extra-flexible, hard-to-configure distros like Slackware.

    Other than that, I'd be interested to know for myself if there is a better system for finding and using CLI commands than the "manpages"; they work great if you already know the name of the command you want to use, but if you need to find out what command does what you need, the manpages are of little use.

    (side note: with Debian-based distros like Ubuntu, you'll want to first check the Package Manager for any software you want to install; the Debian packages are the most foolproof way to install software. And always view the details during package installation, because sometimes the installer will ask you questions through the command line.)
     
  4. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    You need to learn to configure network services. Get a book on Linux that will tell you how to do that, install Unbuntu, and start editing text files and setting up network services: samba, ftp, apache, mysql. These things have great internet docs.

    Running Linux was really good, but I don't know if it is up to date.
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Is there anything like a Linux-specific Wikipedia that could be used to search for commands and procedures without having to know what they're called already?
     
  6. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    I believe 'Running Linux' by Matt Welsh is available free on the web.
     
  7. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    The Ubuntu and Gentoo wikis are excellent resources. Most useful for distro-specific things, but the Gentoo wiki especially has a lot of information that's good for any distro.
     
  8. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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  9. sonicsuby

    sonicsuby New Member

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    If you're looking to learn Linux to apply to a job in IT, I'd recommend not using Ubuntu. Instead, learn RedHat (you can use Fedora Core and get most of the stuff in the RHEL releases). RedHat currently has the largest market share of the enterprise market, and in most IT shops, this is what you'll be using.

    As a UNIX admin, I can tell you some of the things I do on a day-to-day in a large IT shop (> 700 servers total, ~300 running RedHat).

    • How to build the system (install the OS) and install/not install different packages.
    • Securing the system (shutting down unnecessary services) - xinetd, services, etc
    • Know how to configure start scripts.
    • How to patch and update the system without tools like up2date or YUM. Get familiar with rpm.
    • How to make a new filesystem, rebuild an existing filesystem, increase the size of a filesystem (with LVM).
    • Know how to work with external storage devices, either external disk arrays (like SCSI attached arrays) or SAN.
    • How to configure network devices - bonding, setting speed and duplex settings
    • How to configure user and group permissions. Know your permission settings (-rwx) and the implications of different ownership/permission configurations
    • Know where to look to determine system information (like cpu info, memory info, scsi info, etc) and troubleshooting (top, iostat, vmstat).
    • Know where to go for help when you can't figure something out (coworkers, google, etc).

    There's probably a bunch more that I'm missing, but that's the main stuff to really know and know well, because that's the stuff you'll be doing the most ;).
     
  10. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    But... but... redhat is terrible :(
     
  11. sonicsuby

    sonicsuby New Member

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    :dunno: But they've got the only real enterprise ready setup. SuSe is catching up but still don't have the market share.
     
  12. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    What does enterprise ready mean?
     
  13. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    I didn't read the whole thread but if the OP wants to do something in Ubuntu but is having trouble, the best place to start is the ubuntu website. Here's a particularly helpful link:
    https://help.ubuntu.com/

    Here's another great link
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UserDocumentation

    And to the person that said installing Java was difficult, I had no problems when I used this guide:
    https://help.ubuntu.com/6.10/ubuntu/desktopguide/C/java.html

    Ubuntu's guides work very well for many things.....other stuff, we'll you'll have to look around. Post questions here and on their boards, you should be able to find lots of answers
     
  14. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    That's a good question.
     
  15. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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  16. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    the ability to manage and mass-deploy workstation, and subsequent updating, tracking, and maintaining. This is possible with most linux distros... But enterprise means it has it out-of-box and they provide official support.
     
  17. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    In reality... is Redhat making money off of Linux desktops? I am under the perhaps false impression that most of their money comes from servers.
     
  18. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    Not simply servers: licensing, maintenance, consulting, training.

    Fedora makes no money although is an effective and relatively cheap way to QA test future RHEL releases.

    People that want a legitimate free version of an "enterprise" version of linux, use CentOS.

    Suse is bigger then people think, there are more super computers, not beowulf clusters, that run Suse. Suse has more presence in Europe than RH.
     
  19. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    One word. Support.

    Support for hardware and software from RH and ISV's out of the box.

    RH is the most supported version of Linux for software. Solaris is the most supported version of UNIX for software.
     
  20. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    But the licensing, maintenance, consulting and training is all around servers, right? There isn't much redhat desktop going on, right?
     
  21. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    Your terminology of desktop doesn't compute. RH doesn't care what hardware one uses.

    RHEL AS/ES that runs on a desktop. Costs money.

    RHEL Workstation that runs on a desktop. Costs money.

    Fedora that runs on a desktop. Doesn't cost money, but RH saves money by using the GA as their QA lab.

    Making money is not the only way to make money. Heh. Saving it can make money as well. WHOA?!

    Quote from some dumbass RH sales rep.
     
  22. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Desktop as in... end user doing work. I could look this up, I'm just being lazy, but I was not under the impression they sold alot of desktop licenses. Workstation licenses.
     
  23. sonicsuby

    sonicsuby New Member

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    For your use at home, you're going to probably run Fedora. Fedora is pretty cool because they include Fedora in the lifecycle for RHEL. They take components from Fedora that they feel will be useful in the Enterprise world, further strengthen and QA them, then release it. Fedora is free and open-source. The support for Fedora is google and message forums.

    If you wanted to run RedHat on your desktop, say at a company, or even at home, but you wanted support, you buy a support license for RedHat WS. That's a couple hundred bucks. RHEL, the enterprise version that's run on servers, actually is free to use, but you have to pay for support. The costs for support are different between the ES and AS versions. RedHat also has other products out there now, like their Cluster Suite, which is a competitor to Symantec (formerly Veritas), their global support team, their Technical Account management (which is $$$$) and the RedHat Summit they hold each year (they may or may not make money on that, I don't know).

    Here's the Fedora -> RHEL lifecycle image:

    [​IMG]

    I snagged that pic from somewhere on the RedHat site a couple of months ago.
     
  24. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Yeah, I ran Redhat for about 10 years. From as soon as it came out to about 2003? Its just... a lousy distro. It is way behind Ubuntu for the home. Pre-requisite hell like whoah. I wouldn't wish that on any n00b. I had no idea how far behind Redhat was until I tried something else: SuSE, Ubuntu, etc. As soon as I did, I switched.
     
  25. sonicsuby

    sonicsuby New Member

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    I haven't run Fedora yet. I want to but just haven't gotten around to it - I actually lack the hardware to do it at home and still run my windows PC how I want to. Our RedHat support guys were on-site last week and they gave me a DVD with Fedora 6 on it though, so I'm looking forward to getting it going soon :hs:
     

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