Video Editing (Mac vs PC)

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by cecil, Jul 30, 2005.

  1. cecil

    cecil New Member

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    Hey everyone,
    I have a close friend who is a film major and he thinks that the only way to properly edit videos is via a Mac. Although I don't dispute that MACs are good for digital editing, I also know that if you get the right PC, you could do the same job.

    So my question to you is, if you were doing video editing via Avid or Premiere, what would your dream machine be? Would it be a MAC, if so, what specs? If PC, what specs? I figured a nice box with about 2 gigs of ram and a 3 gig processor would do justice but hey.. I'm open for suggestions and I welcome them in advance.

    Thanks. :bowdown:
     
  2. huntz0r

    huntz0r New Member

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    I know people who do high-end video editing on Mac as well as PC. It's mostly personal preference with the OS and software.

    The PC's biggest advantage of course is that it's cheaper than an equivalent PowerMac.
     
  3. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

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    The PC is more powerful for the money. But software issues are what you should look at.
     
  4. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    This isn't really true anymore. We recently priced out two high-end graphics stations for one of the graphics guys at work: one mac and one Dell. We made them as close as possible to each other in actual speed (using some benchmarks as our guide - not the GHz rating since the architechtures are different as can be) so we could figure out which would be a better purchase for the company, especially considering that the guy would be far happier on a Mac, which is what he has now.

    Pricing out three different dual G5 machines, each with 1GB of RAM and a 256MB video card, and three different dual Xeon machines of approximately equivalent benchmark speeds, we discovered that each Mac was actually a few dollars cheaper than its Dell equivalent. Needless to say, we are buying a Mac.

    Not to sound like an Apple commercial or anything, but the Apple-is-more-expensive myth is no longer completely true, especially for high-end workstations.
     
  5. huntz0r

    huntz0r New Member

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    Xeons are outrageous though... price out with an Athlon X2 or Pentium D instead and the results will be a bit different.
     
  6. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

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    You don't need dual processors... One AMD or Intel processor could stomp the G5 in performance and value.
     
  7. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :hsugh: You've never used a G5 for serious multimedia work.
     
  8. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    The Athlon X2 would be a good thing to price out compared to a G5. We didn't do that because a) they're new and hard to get and b) they're pretty well impossible to get in pre-built systems like Dells, and we don't have time to build our own. The Pentium D isn't even a 64-bit chip, so it can't be compared to the Athlon X2 or G5. The Xeon is Intel's G5 competition.
     
  9. JaJae

    JaJae New Member

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    My mistake, you're using 64 bit software? Probably not.

    I'm willing to bet the X2 would destroy any G5 setup for any purpose and they can be found in many top of the line gaming pcs today.
     
  10. Jkuao

    Jkuao New Member

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    Um the basic Prescott core is shared between the Pentium D and the Xeon so actually it is a 64 bit multiprocessor system so it should be included though it still loses out in sheer performance. Both the Xeon and the Pentium D use the same EM64T architecture to handle 64bit operation. You have to step up the Extreme Edition to maintain dual core HT however. Most Xeon boxes get their prices raised due to ECC RAM which I believe is not required by Apple.

    If all you need is a Dual Core w/ 1 GB of RAM and 20" FP...Dell can get you a 3.0 Pentium D 9100 OTD for under $2000 including tax. Doubling to 2GB RAM isn't too much more while by the time you get an Apple with screen, you're looking closer to $3k. Of course you can skip the monitor and buy the same Dell on sale at $430 which puts you at about $2700 not including tax and shipping. This is on the 2Ghz Power Mac as well. At this point you could almost swing for the Extreme Edition for the price of the base PowerMac.

    PowerMac's are definitely nice but still hard to argue them in terms of cost unless you're comparing it against a full blown workstation where the Mac doesn't have the certified video card or ECC RAM. Even so, a GX380 dual core EE w/ 1GB of RAM 250GB is $2700 w/o monitor and 3 year warranty...as long as you don't drop the G on the top of the line Fireball.
     

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