VB.Net Version 6 - Starting Out

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Daria, Feb 2, 2010.

  1. Daria

    Daria New Member

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    Hello, I would like to know if anyone has an suggestions on a good book to get for someone wanting to look at the basics of VB.Net version 6. I can just go to the library and pick one up, but if anyone knows a good one in particular, I would appreciate the recommendations.

    I have an interview for an entry level programmer position and one of the projects the team is doing involves re-writing a program from COBOL to VB.Net version 6. I already know COBOL, but I haven't worked with VB before ( I have worked with C++, C#, and Java before). The job does not require any previous knowledge of VB.Net, but I would like to just familiarize myself somewhat incase I get caught offguard in the interview.

    Thanks in advance for any recommendations.
     
  2. Daria

    Daria New Member

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    bump for replies
     
  3. OniMinion

    OniMinion ...recalls when this forum was actually about cars OT Supporter

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    Bump fail?



    I'd look for a "...For Dummies" series.
     
  4. CodeX

    CodeX Guest

    Why use a book?

    People are going to go :ugh: at that, but a year ago I had never used visual basic or .NET and since then I have written a complex software suite including virtual instruments to accompany the physical instruments that we sell. It is multi-threaded, actively monitoring the connection status of instruments in one thread and monitoring the state of the hard disk to update the file list in real time in another thread, it has a full featured printer driver, it uses third party forms (specifically zedgraph), it uses a customized TreeView list that displays a hierarchical representation of the hard drive that only includes folder paths that eventually end up at files of interest of interest to the application... Anyways, it is as "professional" in form and function as any other windows application you'll ever see.

    The point is, I didn't open a single book, and I can rather confidently say it would have taken me much longer to get to the point I am at if I had gotten bogged down in books. Just experiment for a while to begin with, you'll be surprised how quickly you start picking it up. When I can't figure something out I type it out in google, look at forum posts of people with a similar problem, and usually the solution is right there. If not, then the MSDN has the info you'll ever need. For example, I recently had a problem with the application crashing if the user disconnected the USB cable unexpectedly, I looked it up and found out it was a known problem with the .NET SerialPort class and the FTDI drivers for our USB->UART bridge chip, I found a workaround that was posted by Microsoft and resolved the problem in a few minutes.

    I know this method of learning isn't for everyone but a lot of people don't even try to just figure stuff out on their own. I firmly believe it makes you a much better problem solver and by always relying on books you miss out on developing some important skills.

    Cliffs:
    -No I don't have any book suggestions, sorry.
     
  5. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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    If you are really good with cobol and are really good with C++, java, doing VB.net is a cake walk. I would hammer more on those points that you're good at with the interview because that will mean alot more than VB.net skills. Just get a for dummies style book and get the gist of it.
     
  6. Fase

    Fase Your Face, In A Pickle Jar.

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    You mean VB 6?

    There is no VB.NET 6. Dot NET is currently 3.5. VB6 doesn't use .NET.
     
  7. modspace

    modspace New Member

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    Thats what I was going to say.. VB6 came out in like 1998
     
  8. Daria

    Daria New Member

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    Ok, thanks for replies. I wasn't going to use this knowledge to press any points in an interview. It's just incase any questions get thrown at me where I might have to give an opinion. Mostly, I'm just curious as to what I could be working with.

    Yes, I found out last night that the rewrite is actually from VB6 to VB.Net. I think they do maintenance on a COBOL application, not rewrites, so that's where COBOL will come into play.

    Godzilla, you raise a very good point. I was told VB is easy, so I think the fact that I know C++ and Java is more than enough of a headstart to learn VB.

    Codex, I wanted a book, because one of the learning activities I actually enjoy is learning by reading.

    I think in this case, since the language is apparently so simple, I may take OniMinion's suggestion and get a "for dummies" book.

    Thank you all for the input.
     
  9. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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    If the companies any good they will look at how able you are to learn and adapt than how much you know at your current level. If you show them some really awesome shit you did in C++ obviously you'll have no problems with VB. Of course it'd be ideal to show them something awesome in VB but then again I've never heard of anything awesome written in VB.
     
  10. CodeX

    CodeX Guest


    That's kind of an odd statement. The language you use doesn't really affect how impressive a particular program is. much like how the written language used doesn't affect how good a book is
     

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