Using Pyramid Technique in Lifting?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Brodan, Mar 5, 2007.

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  1. Brodan

    Brodan Guest

    Recently learned this from my Dad actually, he said it was a common lesson in P.E.

    http://www.buildleanmuscle.com/weight-lifting-pyramid.html



    As I understand it this is supposed to give strength+endurance, each time I've lifted with it I tend to push myself farther than with any other routine (5 sets of the same weight, for example). I was told this is because the muscles get fired up through the early sets in the pyramid, allowing for better lifts once you hit the heavy reps.


    If you look at any teen-early 20's guys they use routines completely different from pyramid technique.

    There's also the reverse pyramid, starting with higher weight lower reps etc. I'd like to try that too. My dad has done alot of logging in the past 20 years, he is :bowdown: for a 45 year old and can perform multiple pyramids.
     
  2. TZ

    TZ Banned

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    i keep the same # of reps just increase weight :dunno:
     
  3. Kev07

    Kev07 New Member

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    for my bench i start with 7 then 5, 3, 1 each time adding another 5 pounds
     
  4. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    .
     
  5. Brodan

    Brodan Guest

    Guess so. Really feels more like endurance than strength.
     
  6. Gothamist

    Gothamist New Member

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    I like to increase how many I do, while slightly increasing my weight
     
  7. Brodan

    Brodan Guest

    Third day on this technique :o I can feel a big difference.

    I've been adding 10 lbs per set rather than 5.
     
  8. m3 bavaria

    m3 bavaria Come again?

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    When I was playing competitive tennis, I did this because my trainer told me that it was the best system for achieving both strength and endurance. :dunno:
     
  9. lawrencel715

    lawrencel715 New Member

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    the pyramid would seem to involve overtraining if you're not careful and push too hard. the good thing about a 5x5 using the same weight is that you don't overtrain, yet still progressively hit your PRs.

    but of course, that state of overtraining is different for different lifters.
     
  10. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

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    I used a sort of strange pyramid for my chest the other day, just to change things up...

    Whadda ya think:

    185x12 - flat
    225x10 - flat
    275x8 - flat
    275x8 - incline
    225x10 - incline
    185x12 - incline

    my shit was numb for 2 days, and is just starting to get really sore...

    I love it.
     
  11. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    (Zatsiorsky, Science and Practice of Strength Training, p.116)

    "Pyramid" training, popular many years ago, involves gradually changing the load in a series of sets in an ascending and then a descending manner. This has been virtually abandoned by Olympic-caliber athletes. The ascending part of such a routine induces premature fatigue, while the descending portion is not efficient since it is performed in a fatigued state. For contemporary training, fast progression to the main training load is typical.
     
  12. caucasion

    caucasion New Member

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    which means a few warm up sets then heavy weight?
     
  13. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    yeah
     
  14. turbo35

    turbo35 haters gonna hate

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    bumping this... so a contemporary belief would be warmups, then nail out as heavy as you can go for maybe 5-8... then knock out another set of the same weight as far as you can go... etc?

    They say the downward slope is inefficient because "you're already fatigued"... but isn't that kinda the point? Instead of not being able to do anymore at x weight (or maybe just get it up once or twice), why not drop 10-15 lbs and knock out another 4 or 5? You're getting more volume in there and I'd hardly consider that "overtraining"... so why is this bad again? "already fatigued"?? :ugh:
     
  15. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

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    When I did Arnold's Level I routine it basically used this scheme.

    15 reps
    10-12
    8-19
    6

    Increasing the weight each time. I found that I gained mass much quicker than I gained strength. Conversely, his routine called for deadlifting with 6 reps, 4, then 2, which made me gain strength a lot faster.
     
  16. Perkwunos

    Perkwunos Dog Bones OT Supporter

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    I think it can be alright if you don't do it completely retarded
    work up to around 70-80% for a few sets, then come back down doing sets of higher reps.
     
  17. cossack

    cossack Resident thread killer

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    same weight less reps each time . works for push ups i dont know why it wouldn't work with bench or squat
     
  18. igo4bmx

    igo4bmx WHAT WHAT WHAT THE FU OT Supporter

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    i've done that for the first 4-5 years of my gym life.

    worked fine for me.
     
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