A&P Using in camera meter

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Budha, Mar 31, 2010.

  1. Budha

    Budha Guest

    Hello everyone, I am about to ask the biggest noob question of all time. I understand the basics of photography (aperture, iso, shutter, etc), but I am coming from the video world and I have no idea how to meter things to get exposure.

    I have a T2i and I am guessing that wherever I point my camera, the bottom row of numbers/info in the viewfinder is the suggested exposure?

    I would really appreciate any input/articles you have on how to use this thing to the best of its ability.

    Thanks!
     
  2. SkiMax

    SkiMax OT Supporter

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  3. Wobistdu

    Wobistdu Guest

  4. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    That post was written by an old fart. The new hotness is to learn to use your histogram. There are a number of great articles on exposure on Fred Miranda forums.
     
  5. Wobistdu

    Wobistdu Guest


    histograms are great

    until you do night shots, or need to overexpose/underexpose due to environment :x:

    damn why do i have to keep teaching you this stuff. :love:
     
  6. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    Gotta learn to read the histogram. Once you master it the humps are parts of the image. Of course there are some times when you'll have to blow out something on the histogram to expose your subject properly (ie the sky while shooting people.) In a scene like that the sky will be to the far right and clipped off the edge while the person, ground, other lighter things will be a hump in the middle. Shadows and other dark objects will show in the left portion. The goal would be to move the subject (or mid tones) as far right as possible without pushing them into the highlights.
     
  7. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    I pretty much leave my 40D in evaluative metering, shoot P mode for most situations, and use the rear control wheel to adjust exp comp. Typically I find that my camera + lenses need +2/3 exp comp to correctly expose a scene. I then adjust as necessary.

    Similar in Av and Tv modes, but when in manual I typically also put my flash in manual and adjust things as needed.
     
  8. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Read the spikes young padwan. Become one with the graph and you become one with the picture.
     
  9. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    understanding the zone system and how reflective metering is a crucial part of photography
     
  10. Wobistdu

    Wobistdu Guest

    :eek3: become great, i must
     
  11. Wobistdu

    Wobistdu Guest

    i wonder how reliable the highlights are on the d90. i can view over/unders that are blown out with the click of the arrows. light room shows them nicely, but the d90 lcd seems to do nicely too
     
  12. Budha

    Budha Guest

    I appreciate everyone that replied.

    I have one more question, I always see photographers composing the shot, quickly pointing the lens a few inches over, going back to the original composition, and then taking the shot.

    What exactly are they doing here?
     
  13. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    They're using the center focus point (the most accurate one) to nail the focus then reframing the shot.
     
  14. bbp

    bbp bike watching troll king OT Supporter

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    They could be doing an exposure lock too.
     
  15. Budha

    Budha Guest

    Mojito,

    Do you know of any good online resources that discuss that concept in greater detail?
     
  16. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    off the top of my head, no. ansel adams has some serious info if you're a techy and have a good grasp. if you're just trying to learn the basics :dunno:

    I'm sure theres a bunch of good stuff out there, I'm guess the Luminous landscapes has a few basic tutorials :hs:
     
  17. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    true.
     
  18. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    A book we recommend on here alot is "Understanding Exposure" Its easy to follow and a must read for anyone getting into photography. A very fast read too since its a thin book full of photos examples.
     
  19. Budha

    Budha Guest

    EW, I definitely want to buy that one day, I am just trying to save some money right now. That's why I was looking for an online resource of some sort. I understand the concept of metering, I am just looking for something that says, hey don't trust your meter here etc. The write up that was done for OTAP was excellent, but it didn't go into enough detail for me.

    Thanks guys.
     
  20. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    The way I learned where and when I can trust my meter is by shooting and looking at the data on the histogram. As I stated earlier I pretty much know that my 40D will underexpose any scene by -2/3 stop so I adjust the exposure comp setting to correct it.

    Today I took my wife and daughter to the zoo and I carried my 40D + 70-200 2.8 around practising the "rear AF button" technique that so many find useful. I plan to use it at my next wedding and am making sure I don't screw it up. It was overcast skies and I had to move my EXP COMP to +1 stop to get correct exposure.
     
  21. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    so in short, the meter thinks what ever its pointed at is middle gray.
    in the zone system, it in the middle :o

    White without detail
    white with detail
    light gray
    middle gray
    dark gray
    black with detail
    black without detail

    the difference between a level here is 1 full stop.

    But chances are, your subject isn't middle gray. so if you know its a black cat, and you want detail in the fur, you'll need to dial +2 stops into EC or shoot in manual. If its a white dinner plate, you'd need to subtract 2 stops. . . .

    things that are middle gray you can work with include skin, a dark blue sky, green grass . . .
     
  22. Heinzanova

    Heinzanova OT Supporter

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    I think use of any cross point is most accurate. I honestly think you should use the one that is closest to the object with out recomposing because as you move side to side aspects of the lens change what is 100% is in focus.
     

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