GUN used brass?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by daviid, Oct 18, 2005.

  1. daviid

    daviid cell tower tech

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    ive been saving all my 223 ive been firing. im not sure if i want to reload or scrap it. anyone know if metal yards will take gun brass?
     
  2. krott5333

    krott5333 Guest

    sell it on gunbroker
     
  3. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    You'd probably get more selling it to someone who reloads, but once fired .223 brass is everywhere so it isn't exactly worth alot.
     
  4. mrbill

    mrbill New Member

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    sell it online, put an ad in the paper, or take it to a gunshow and see if any of the folks selling reloads will buy it from you.

    or, you could buy some equipment and start reloading your own.
     
  5. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    Not worth it for .223 in my opinion, unless you're shooting long range or varmints.
     
  6. mrbill

    mrbill New Member

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    true, but it is an option.
     
  7. skeletor25rs

    skeletor25rs Yetis & Deer

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    I'm in the same position except in .308
     
  8. footratfunkface

    footratfunkface New Member

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    It's a bitch to reload .223 because of all the shit you've got to do to it. Many people who reload .223 gather up reloadable brass, and send it to someone to be processed. That processor will clean, resize, trim, decrimp primers, etc. and all else that needs to be done. You've got to lube .223 brass to reload it, then clean all the damn lube off afterward. It really is a pain in the ass, which is why it's hard to find good prices on processing.

    It also has to be certain brass. You can't use shitty brass, and you don't want brass with crimped primers. That means NATO-spec ammo is out. You also don't use Berdan primed brass.
     
  9. Dsking85

    Dsking85 New Member

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    we tried reloading our own and we got so tired of it we just bought it. the only .223 we reload now is 82grs for our 600 yard matches, but only b/c you can't buy them.
     
  10. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    Reloading .223 wouldn't be bad if you had a nice progressive press, but other than that there's no way I would do it unless I wanted something that wasn't factory loaded.
     
  11. Heinzanova

    Heinzanova OT Supporter

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    this is why you hirer a mexican to sit in your basement and reload a 1000 rounds for you, for $5 for the day of work.


    I do it for my .223 and my .40
     

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