Upright Neider press

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Fattiefalldown, May 20, 2006.

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  1. Fattiefalldown

    Fattiefalldown t(-.-t)

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    I started doing these a little while ago, and was wondering if you see more weight progress keeping your leg movement still and just using the upper body, or exploding with everything? Vid can be found here, this guy is doing the explosive version. http://www.rossboxing.com/samplevideoclip.htm
    Can anyone here testify for it's long term effects?
     
  2. kronik85

    kronik85 New Member

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    looks like an excellent way to dislocate your shoulder... but i would say best done explosively.
     
  3. Fattiefalldown

    Fattiefalldown t(-.-t)

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    You're not supposed to snap the end of it wth a full extension...perhaps thats a part of the technique to safeguard the shoulder a bit?:dunno: Hasn't felt too bad on my shoulder

    edit- I'd be a bit more worried about my elbow...
     
  4. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Something to think about:

    For many years, there have been two opposing theories of supplementary strength training in sport. One theory proposes that strength training should simulate the sporting movements as closely as possible with regard to movement pattern, velocity, force-time curve, type of muscule contraction and so forth, whereas the other maintains that it is sufficient to train the relevant muscles with no regard to specificity. Separate practice of technical skills would then permit one to utilise in sporting movements the strength gained in non-specific training. While both approaches to strength training will improve performance, current scientific research strongly supports the superiority of the specificity in at least ten respects:

    • Type of Muscle Contraction
    • Movement Pattern
    • Region of Movement
    • Velocity of Movement
    • Force of Contraction
    • Muscle Fibre Recruitment
    • Metabolism
    • Biochemical Adaptation
    • Flexibility
    • Fatigue​

    In the context of training, specificity should not be confused with simulation. Specificity training means exercising to improve in a highly specific way the expression of all the above factors in a given sport. While simulation of a sporting movement with small added resistance over the full range of movement or with larger resistance over a restricted part of the movement range may be appropriate at certain stages of training, simulation of any movement with significant resistance is inadvisable since it can confuse the neuromuscular programmes which determine the specificity of the above factors.

    Even if one is careful to apply simulation training by using implements or loads that are similar to those encountered in the sport, there will usually be changes in the centre of gravity, moments of inertia, centre of rotation, centre of percussion and mechanical stiffness of the system which alter the neuromuscular skills required in the sport.

    Simulation training which involves imitation of a specific movement using more resistance than encountered in actual performance compels the body or its limbs to operate at a different speed, recruit different muscles and use different patterns of muscular activity as compared with the competition movements. Simulation training in tennis, for instance, might involve practice of the backhand stroke with weights or pulley machines offering additional resistance to the playing arm. Unless simulation takes place over a small, well-controlled segment of a complicated movement or with very small differences in loading, it should form no part of an athlete's routine. Strength and skill are different aspects of training and generally should be developed separately, except in sports such as weightlifting, gymnastics and shotputting which integrate both factors in explosive, single movements. (Supertraining 2003, pp. 27, 73)
     
  5. Fattiefalldown

    Fattiefalldown t(-.-t)

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    Thats interesting. There is a huge difference between sports specific training and skill specific training. This press for example could probably be done with heavy weight for few reps, but I would imagine that the applied speed benefit you get from the exercise would be lower. I'm just curious if anyone has taken this technique and gone heavy with it, or if people use it for more sport specific reasons, and what people's experience with it is.
    I started doing it to work on my cross, so I tend to use it for simulation training purposes, but I could see where it could be a good overall strength movement for the tri's and delts. opinion?
     
  6. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    :wtf:
     
  7. MP18

    MP18 New Member

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    more useful knowledge has fallen on deaf ears
     
  8. Fattiefalldown

    Fattiefalldown t(-.-t)

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    Sorry phrased that pretty badly...What I meant was that PHYSICAL training is different than SKILL training ie specificity vs. simulation training. Just switched the words up. My bad.:dunno:
     
  9. PreemO

    PreemO OT Supporter

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    looks like a plyo for boxing
     
  10. Fattiefalldown

    Fattiefalldown t(-.-t)

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    That's exactly what it is, to work the cross.
    However, what we're seeing here is the case of making it a much more sport specific exercise by utilizing boxing technique behind it (ie. the body movement) However, I'm just curious if anyone here has used it primarily as a strength building method, cutting out the extra body movement and really adding up weight to it? I haven't seen it used as such, but it seems like it can be done.
     
  11. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    except it will make you a worse boxer rather than a better one
     
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