Ubuntu help

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by gui3, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. gui3

    gui3 all the dude ever wanted was his rug back

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    hey - i'm new to ubuntu, giving it a shot virtualized with virtualbox.
    i've searched forums, and i can't get a solution.

    i'm trying to get a shared folder mounted. it's set up in virtualbox. i'm logged under my regular non-root account.
    i created a folder in a directory (using the non-root acct), and using the GUI i edited the properties of the folder to give access to everyone in the "admin" group.
    then i did: sudo mount -t vboxsf [shared folder] /home/myaccount/directory

    i can't access the directory - says i don't have permissions.
    so i tried giving "everyone" permissions using chmod. didn't work.
    so i tried editing the permissions in the GUI as a super user with sudo nautilus. didn't work.

    what else can i do? i've been reading forums like crazy, but this is the big roadblock for me with linux. everything requires sudo, but when i do something with sudo the regular accounts dont have access and i have to keep trying things in terminal. i don't have a problem wrestling with an OS a bit, but i'm stuck.
     
  2. DigiCrime

    DigiCrime If Only!

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    mount -t vboxsf /home/myaccount/directory ? I forgot :hs: try it anyway
     
  3. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    try:
    mount -t vboxsf -o rw /home/myaccount/directory
     
  4. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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    what chmod command did you use?
     
  5. gui3

    gui3 all the dude ever wanted was his rug back

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    thanks for the responses.

    first: what's the -o switch?
    chmod: i used a command i found online to give permissions to all users, i think it was 777...to edit the permissions as root and give everyone access.

    apologies if i sound like a retard - trying to move beyond windows/osx.
     
  6. DigiCrime

    DigiCrime If Only!

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    777 gives everyone read/write/execute

    man mount

    will give you info on the -o option

    Options are specified with a -o flag followed by a comma sepa-
    rated string of options. Some of these options are only useful
    when they appear in the /etc/fstab file. The following options
    apply to any file system that is being mounted (but not every
    file system actually honors them - e.g., the sync option today
    has effect only for ext2, ext3, fat, vfat and ufs):
     
  7. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    -o is specific to options you want to pass to the mount command

    type: man mount

    and that will give you all the documentation
     
  8. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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  9. GammaRadiation

    GammaRadiation Active Member

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    I dont mean to thread jack but I have a similar question.

    Is there a way to force mount a drive from a live disk? For instance, if I wanted to recover data off the drive but the MBR to the OS on the drive is corrupt beyond repair.

    Every time I try the commands in the mount manual it fails.
     

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