TTAC - 2010 Ford Mustang GT

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, Apr 1, 2009.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Ford’s built the ultimate ponycar around an engine which is seventy-five horsepower short of the competition.

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    By Jack Baruth
    April 1, 2009

    Many years ago, it became quite fashionable to refer to The Clash as “the only band that ever really mattered.” Chevrolet borrowed this evocative line for the introduction of the soft-top C5 Corvette, calling it “the only convertible that ever really mattered” in a two-page color-rag spread. Truth be told, though, those are both pretty tough cases to make. And you don’t have to be a Beatles-obsessed Boxster owner (as I am) to argue the contrary. It’s far easier to apply the phrase to the Mustang: the only ponycar that ever mattered. Consider the competition. Camaro, Challenger, Javelin… hell, Celica and 200SX. Some shone, some sucked, none have gone the forty-five-year distance. The Mustang was the first ponycar on the scene, the best ponycar available for much of its history, and the only one to not disappoint its fans with periodic disappearances. And now we have a new “new Mustang,” arriving just in time to spoil the Chevrolet Camaro’s tardy coming-out party.

    The 2010 Ford Mustang’s exterior restyle visually trims the car. The design incorporates certain elements of the Giugiaro concept while retaining the previous roof stamping. The real news is inside. Ford’s been turning out some thoroughly decent interiors… lately. The Mustang is another hit in the parade, providing a tactile experience that feels a solid class above what’s found in the Challenger or Camaro. Even Infiniti and BMW “intenders” would be well-served to at least take a seat in the ‘Stang before making their final purchases. The Mustang’s tactility borders on the European.

    The same is true, ironically, for the powertrain. The three-valve, 4.6-liter “mod motor” can’t match the Chevrolet or Dodge entries on displacement, torque, or power. But it has a rev-happy, broad-shouldered feel that’s immediately familiar to anyone who’s driven one of the smaller V-8s from Audi, BMW, or (whisper it) Porsche. Modern drivers raised on a diet of four-cylinder Hondas will find the light-flywheel Mustang far more to their liking than the strong but ultimately breathless HEMI or LS3 competition.

    What a shame all that sweet-sounding power is fed through a crummy old cart axle, eh? There’s just one problem with that analysis: it’s very close to being completely wrong. Our Hocking Hills test loop revealed the big pony to be a competent broken-pavement runner. Yeah, it steps sideways on corner entrance under ABS and it steps way sideways when you apply the power under bumps. But the steering’s linear predictability makes catching the slide utterly trivial.

    Here’s the drill: Get your braking done hard in a straight line. Let the tail wag its way home until it’s time to turn in, then use patience to dial the steering until you feel the outside sidewall start to slip. If you’re lined-up at this point, feed the power slowly past the clipping point. If you aren’t, boot the throttle as the clipping point appears level with the Mustang’s nose, and rotate past the midcorner for your exit.

    You can trust this car. It will do what you ask it to, and nothing more. The mod-motor’s broad rev range is a massive help here, allowing you to hold gears to the exit without the upshift you’d need in an old “five-point-oh.”

    Our test day featured temperatures well below freezing, with plenty of road salt to spoil the party. It was still possible to hustle the Mustang without reducing one’s life expectancy. Yes, you’d probably be faster in a Lancer Evolution. And it wouldn’t be nearly as much fun.

    The revised Mustang is so good on side roads that one eager mainstream journalist who attended the media preview wrote an entire article praising the effectiveness of the limited-slip differential and “Track Pack” upgrades… on a car which didn’t have either. In fact, it was the same car we had as a tester, and I can tell you that although it didn’t have an LSD, neither did it really need one.

    I’d like to give this Musang a five-star rating. It feels like a five-star car to me: solid, well-made, completely comfortable in its own skin. There’s just one problem, and it’s this: Ford’s built the ultimate ponycar around an engine which is seventy-five horsepower short of the competition. During the ninety-five percent of the car’s life in which the throttle isn’t flat to the floor, the Mustang satisfies in nearly any way one can imagine.

    But late in a Saturday night stoplight-drag session, when the moon is full, the streets shine with neon reflection, and that sexy, slightly slutty girl in the halter top is watching, this cultured, tasteful, character-laden ponycar will have to yield to some Bowtie-mounted moron who actually refers to his car as “Bumblebee.” And that just ain’t right. Because this right here really is the only ponycar that has ever mattered.

    Review Summary

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    PERFORMANCE:
    It only needs a little more motor to really burn.
    RIDE:
    Ford should have told people it had IRS. They’d have believed.
    HANDLING:
    Old school. Your problem being?
    EXTERIOR:
    This is what a Mustang should look like.
    INTERIOR:
    No ponycar has ever been so inviting.
    FIT AND FINISH:
    Hard to believe this is from the same people who brought you the ’79 Mustang. PCD (Press car disclaimer.)
    TOYS:
    It really needs the full nav system, which costs one zillion dollars.
    DESIRABILITY:
    Name another $30K car which inspires this kind of passion.
    MILEAGE:
    TBA
    PRICE AS TESTED:
    $33,565
    OVERALL:
    Ford fulfills the ponycar promise and might just snag a few 3-Series owners along the way.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. 5.0Torx

    5.0Torx New Member

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    but drifting terms are as mad tyte as drifting itself yo!
     
  3. CJPA

    CJPA New Member

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    Do want with 5.0L
     
  4. CopenKagan

    CopenKagan OT Supporter

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    :werd:

    If I get one, I will be waiting until 2011.
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Sounds pretty nice, actually. A good counterpoint to driving a Prius to work every day.
     
  6. you know me

    you know me OT where the douchbags play

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    … hell, Celica and 200SX...

    ummm wat
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    In case it isn't obvious, this article was written by someone who has not always idolized domestic sports cars. Which makes the positive review that much more valuable, if you think about it.

    I'm more confused about his praise for the Mustang's vintage. Isn't the Corvette older? And wasn't the original tagline "The only American sports car that ever really mattered"?

    Also, I feel compelled to point out that this car and this article prove a point I argued probably over a year ago, that if you have good enough traction you don't damn well need a limited-slip differential -- they're just bandaids for cars that can't stick the wheels to the ground.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2009
  8. 5.0Torx

    5.0Torx New Member

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    If you have good traction, its ok to have an open differential?

    Have you ever driven a car with an open diff?

    LSDs are where its at dude. That goes for cars with crappy tires and for cars with good tires.
     
  9. you know me

    you know me OT where the douchbags play

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    I was sitting here going wow this guy is a fucking moron...then I saw it was you and it all made cents
     
  10. CJPA

    CJPA New Member

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    lol
     
  11. Smelly-Kitten

    Smelly-Kitten Dept. of Redundancy Department *Side Pipes

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    I did the same:eek3:
     
  12. T0nyGTSt

    T0nyGTSt New Member

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    i think this the only time i've ever heard anyone anywhere say that LSDs are bad
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I would like for anyone here to explain what good an LSD does if both of the drive wheels are stuck firmly to the pavement. Go ahead.
     
  14. you know me

    you know me OT where the douchbags play

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    do you understand what an lsd does vs an open diff?
     
  15. midnite

    midnite OT Supporter

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    :bowdown: :bowdown:

    my next car :coold:
     
  16. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Yes, I do. When the axles start rotating at different speeds, the LSD resists that difference in rotational speed, ostensibly to keep one wheel from spinning out-of-control while the other sits still on the pavement. Of course, being a "dumb" system, it will resist any difference in rotational speed, even if that difference is due to something completely harmless, like turning a corner.

    My point is that if the suspension and the tires are good enough that there is always sufficient traction to keep both wheels stuck firmly to the ground, then there is no need to have a differential to help solve a problem that doesn't exist, and the LSD will do nothing useful. Case in point: the review mentions another reviewer who was thrilled to pieces with the traction the car had, and assumed it was because an LSD was present, when in fact the tires and suspension were doing their jobs properly in the first place. So there would've been no noticeable improvement in traction had an LSD been installed, at least not at stock horsepower.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2009
  17. 5.0Torx

    5.0Torx New Member

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    If i must...

    It sends power to BOTH wheels, not the one with LESS traction, like an open diff does. If youre cornering, an open will send power to the inside tire and youll most likely spin it if youve got an engine with some balls. You would know this if youve driven an open vs LSD first hand.

    Performance aside, we all love doing donuts or hanging the tail out, and it is not nearly as fun with an open diff, where you are spinning the inside tire and just skidding on the outside one. You would know this if youve driven an open vs LSD first hand.

    LSDs also make the car more four-season friendly. Design of the suspension and tires will have little benefit if one tire is in slush and one tire is on pavement. You would know this if youve driven an open vs LSD first hand.

    As for the reviewer who was thrilled to pieces, he probably wasnt pushing the car to its limits.

    Again, have you actually driven a car with an open diff? Does your car have an open or LSD?
     
  18. 5.0Torx

    5.0Torx New Member

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    Oh, and when launching hard for straight-line performance with a V8, rwd car, the torque from the engine and natrual right/left weight distribution will put more weight on one tire over the other. An open will launch hard for .1 seconds til the weight shifts and then youre just blowing one tire.


    I think that pretty much covers all the bases.
     
  19. you know me

    you know me OT where the douchbags play

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    don't worry he'll come back with something stupid
     
  20. 5.0Torx

    5.0Torx New Member

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    yes....im sure he will.

    And since he's too stubborn to accept it conceptually, ill prove it statistically. :wiggle:
     
  21. T0nyGTSt

    T0nyGTSt New Member

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    i find it really odd that you would take note of what some anonymous reviewer has said... it wasn't even Jack Baruth... it could have been some clown from cnet or about.com
     
  22. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    It's a valid point, but if you're racing the thing you should be running better tires so they won't slip in the first place. There's no advantage to having any amount of wheelspin, regardless of whether that wheelspin is evenly-distributed between the two drive wheels. I do have to point out, though, that a difference in the weight balance doesn't change how much torque goes to each drive wheel, it changes how much torque each wheel can withstand before it starts spinning. The effect is the same either way, but it's important to understand the underlying physics anyway.

    So once again, if you have enough grip that the wheels don't start spinning in the first place, the LSD does nothing useful. That's all my original point was. Yes, if you have wheelspin, then an LSD is useful -- believe me, I've spun the wheels on my FWD cars enough times to know what a one-wheel wonder is. But in my book, if there's wheelspin then the first thing to fix is the traction, not the torque split.
     
  23. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I've driven both. Anyway, as noted in my previous post, the torque split only becomes uneven once one of the drive wheels starts spinning, and in my mind, the problem is not that the torque split is uneven, but that the drive wheels are spinning at all.

    I'll have to take your word for it. While I've accidentally oversteered a couple of RWD cars, ironically the only one I've done it on purpose with is FWD with a really stiff rear swaybar, so there was no rear wheelspin anyway.

    True, LSDs are useful for bad-weather traction. On the other hand, while I'm pretty disenchanted with anything Volkswagen makes anymore, I have to say the Quattro AWD system is brilliant -- open diffs all around, and the ABS system keeps wheelspin from happening by engaging individual brakes on the wheels that lose traction. No extra parts needed.

    Open. On rare occasion I do get some inside wheelspin, but I upgraded the tires when I chipped the engine so there's more than enough traction 99% of the time. That remaining 1% isn't enough for me to drop $1300 on a Quaife LSD.
     
  24. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    2010 Ford Mustang GT, Take Two

    [​IMG]

    By Robert Farago
    May 27, 2009

    TTAC writer Samir Syed was on the lamb last night, cooked by yours truly. To honor the dead sheep’s spirit, Sam brought by a rented Ford Mustang GT. For some reason, I never got ’round to driving Ford’s latest Pony Car, what with the world’s largest bankruptcy looming on the editorial horizon and my step-daughter’s after-school activities ending for the term. Anyway, the car in which I was about to go roaming in the gloaming embodied its designers’ desire to re-infused the ’Stang with some understated classicism—while attempting to add a bit of visual drama (swage much?). Other than a hideously overwrought rear, there’s nothing particularly wrong with the result. Not to put fine a point on it (so to speak), the new Mustang doesn’t give me wood. Still, personal fertility and automotive blue pill issues aside, there are plenty of reasons to be cheerful.

    The new Mustang’s new interior is pleasant enough. If that sounds like I’m damning the ’Stang with faint praise, it’s because I am. The Mustang’s cockpit is an excellent example a car cabin where pleasing shapes and ergonomic excellence try their level best to hide the fact that Polly Pocket’s Playhouse is fashioned from finer stuff. Pushing and prodding the Mustang’s IP, grabbing a shifter whose solidity is beyond reproach (and not in a good way), it was not the last time I was left thinking, well, at the right price, I wouldn’t complain. Much.

    Right off the bat, the ’Stang lacks the one thing that renders any critical judgment moot: the burble. It’s what made Christine evil. It’s what made the last gen M5 Bavarian crack. It’s what entices you out of the office and onto the road. Not here. Sure, poke the Mustang’s 4.6-liter V8 with a stick (or better yet, the gas pedal), and the Ford powerplant growls soon enough. In fact, too soon. Like a V8-engined AMG product, the Mustang roars at the slightest provocation, a couple of beats before the car can pick up its skirts and run. The new Mustang only sounds like it’s fully realized at full chat. And how often is that going to happen?

    Hopefully, not often. I say this knowing that there are those of you who will enjoy caning the new Mustang GT for the same reason I wouldn’t recommend it: the car is a handful. By that I mean, the new Mustang wants to jump sideways. An experienced driver can feel it even at slow speeds: the live rear axle’s disinclination to keep all four wheels on the ground at the same time, all the time. Cane the Mustang at speed over a badly broken surface and you’re pavement surfing; sawing at the wheel has about as much impact on your direction as your choice of interior lighting color. Rendezvous with a large bump mid-corner and it’s like country music line dancing—only you’re hopping towards objects that can kill you dead.

    Real men and experienced Mustang GT drivers know the drill: sit it out. When it’s over, recover your confidence by applying copious quantities of horse power in more grip-friendly situations. Short of doing the right thing—fitting the pony car with an independent rear suspension—Ford’s engineers have done a good thing. The new Mustang GT feels significantly stiffer and more predictable (i.e., better at not scaring the shit out of me) than the old one. It’s also better built. More comfortable. Slightly better looking. But taken as whole, I found the new Mustang GT a distinctly underwhelming experience.

    Don’t get me wrong: the new Mustang GT does exactly what it should do. It’s an authentic continuation of a popular model that delivers significant bang-for-the-buck. Owners of the previous generation will make the switch to the new car and revel in what Ford under CEO Alan Mulally has wrought. And now that the Dodge Challenger and Chevrolet Camaro are being built (or not) by bankrupt companies, the way is clear for the Mustang to continue and extend its reign as the last muscle car standing. And yet . . .

    Ford seems hell bent on being a jack of all trades, master of none. The new Mustang GT reminds of nothing so much as the Honda Accord coupe: a car that does everything you expect it to do without ever doing anything that makes you really want it. Driving around in the GT, I can almost hear Ford engineers ticking off boxes on a muscle car check list. What Ford in general and the Mustang GT in specific need is a gotta-have-it killer app. It could’ve been the interior, or the engine sound, or the handling, or a paddle shift transmission system or something. Something that would appeal to the Mustang GT’s driver’s nether regions. As it is, the Mustang GT’s a hit without a hook.
     
  25. CJPA

    CJPA New Member

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    That review is pretty much the opposite of the other 20 reviews available right now.
     

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