To Overclock or Not to Overclock?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by StPatty33, Jul 18, 2005.

  1. StPatty33

    StPatty33 New Member

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    Hey guys,
    I was wondering if overclocking really lowers the life of your processors as much as I've heard some people say (from 5 years to maybe 1 year)?

    I've got an AMD 2500+ Barton OC'd to a 3200+ on an Abit NF7-S MB, with a thermaltake heatsink and arctic silver paste. It was tested for a solid 12 hours at 100% stability when it was initially OC'd, and it's run nothing but beautiful for the year I've had it set up.

    As cheap as the processor would be now it probably wouldn't be a big deal to shell out for another if something were to happen, but I just like to know where I stand, you know?

    I appreciate any insight you guys may have :)
     
  2. StPatty33

    StPatty33 New Member

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    Also, I've got a 512 stick of GeIL PC3200 running in it--
    I've never tried messing around with it's voltage and OC'ing it, would it make much difference?

    I'm planning on tossing in a Gig stick of the same ram (in addition to the 512), would this make a whole lot of difference (I usually run lots of programs simultaneously--PhotoShop, Illustrator, Media Player, eDonkey, Acrobat all at once, for example) and again, should I try and overclock the memory at all? *shrugs* Thanks again for the input.
     
  3. Mastertech

    Mastertech New Member

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    Yes overclocking lowers the operational life of components but by how much depends on how and what you are overclocking and how much those components are being pushed. The one fact about overclocking is that ANY error you receive in the future cannot be ruled out as caused by the overclocking itself. So you never really know unless you clock it to factory and retest. You get safer results by simply optimizing your system.
     
  4. cmsurfer

    cmsurfer ºllllllº

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    Just giving my opinion here, I don't understand why people overclock. As said above and as I've read before, it can significantly lower the life of the CPU and possibly other components.

    If I wanted my CPU to be faster, I'd buy a faster one.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    a *Proper* and *safe* overclock will not reduce the life of any components. Most people can't do a proper/safe oc, however.
     
  6. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    I bet I could set your CPU back to its original speed and you wouldn't notice the difference unless you looked up the speed.
     
  7. Mastertech

    Mastertech New Member

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    There is no such thing, there are "safer" ways to overclock but there are no official "safe" ways. The only way an overclock would be truely safe is if you are overclocking a component that was bin sorted down to meet volume demand needs. In which case the component was already rated to run faster but they needed to sell more at X speed. The consumer has 0 way to determine this and can never be sure. Thus increasing the frequency and especially the voltage will reduce the life of the component. By how much depends on numerous factors.
     
  8. yeah im sure it does shorten the life somewhat, in fact i just had an Epox 4PEA+ pentium 4 board die early, well at 2.5 years, it ran a 2.4b Northwood @ 3.3GHz (183fsb, 50mhz over it's highest rated fsb setting) for most of it's lifetime.... the CPU is fine though, it's running in this computer, on a different board as i type this.

    overclocking is worth it, especially if your someone with alot of computer stuff, or access to alot of computer stuff....something of mine dies, i just salvage the good stuff and make another machine..
     

  9. no :mamoru:


    my cpu at default does superpi 1M in 1M10S, overclocked it does it in 48S


    at default according to sandra, right at 2.4 northwood speeds, right where it should be..but with the FSB and core clocked up it performs around what a 3.6 northwood should according to that program
     
  10. StPatty33

    StPatty33 New Member

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    Thanks for the info guys.

    I think I'm going to keep it OC'd, as the 2500+ and 2600+ Bartons are supposed to be the best chips to OC--I've read that a good amount of them actually ARE 3200+ chips. Also it's not everyday you find one that'll overclock that much and stay 100% stable, which would lead me to believe this is probably one of the 3200+ chips.

    So what about RAM? Should I even bother messing tweaking the timing of it at all? Or is it best to just grab another gig stick like I've got planned anyway...










    ________________________________________________
    AMD Athlon XP 3200+ w/Thermaltake Heatsink
    Abit NF7-S v2
    GeIL 512 DDR400
    Seagate 7200 RPM 8M Cashe 300g HD
    WD 7200 RPM 8M Cashe 120g HD
    WD 10,000 RPM 8M Cashe Serial ATA 36.7g HD
    HP DVD Burner
    ATI Radeon 9800 Pro
    350W PS
     
  11. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    processors are manufactured as the fastest chip in that "series". So barton's were made to 3200+ specs. However, not all would certify at those speeds. For example, you could have a 2800+ that was made originally as a 3200+, failed the cert, was marketed as a 2800+, and you can't o/c worth a shit. Likewise, you could have a 2600+ that goes all the way to 3200+ specs.

    There is no guarantee in overclocking. The only guarantee is that the chip will run at the speed printed on the die.
     
  12. StPatty33

    StPatty33 New Member

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    ahhhhh, ok. Thanks then--with mine being completely stable for over a year now, I don't think I'm gonna worry one bit then. *nods*
     
  13. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    Sorry, I should of specified using NORMAL aps and games. If you spend all your time finding out digits for pi, then yeah, OCing is useful, otherwise you wouldn't notice any difference.
     
  14. Tom93R1

    Tom93R1 Member

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    When you OC you may reduce the CPU lifetime from 20 years to 10 years, but in reality since the useful lifetime of a CPU is only a few years you may end up getting a big boost in useful lifetime.
    I have never had a CPU that I didnt overclock. Back in the day I bought a PII 350 and ran it 392 for a few years then passed it on to my parents, they still have it. Next I had a PIII 550 running at 733, ran that a couple years now my friend has it. Now the last couple years I have had a P4 2.4c running at 3.0. Every one of these CPUs when I had them was running at 100% 24/7 processing [email protected] Never have I had a CPU fail, unless you are doing some extreme over-volting or not properly cooling the chip you will be perfectly fine with that OC for years to come.

    To get more than you paid for. When I picked up my P2 350 it was about half the price of a 400. Same with my P4 2.4c, it cost about half what a P4 3.0 did and I was able to get approximately the same performance.
     
  15. StPatty33

    StPatty33 New Member

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    I appreciate the info, eh. I'd never had any reservations about it until I read several warnings recently. I'll leave my lil' 'puter be, then *nods*
     
  16. danskmacabre

    danskmacabre Guest

    I have a Barton 2500, which at stock speed runs at 1.8 GHZ.
    I have overclocked it to 2.13 GHZ and iyt's been that way for a couple of years nw with no probs.

    However I did make sure I got a decent cooler, and used Arctic silver thermal paste and made sure my box is ventilated well.
     
  17. StPatty33

    StPatty33 New Member

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    awesome, sounds good then--mine's at 2.19 GHZ. I've got a big thermaltake heatsink w/arctic silver paste and several fans. 'pershate' it--as they say in the south.
     
  18. danskmacabre

    danskmacabre Guest


    You're probably OK.
    BUT, processors vary from different batch runs, so I'm definitely not making guarantees.
    I should note that I made sure I cleaned up my cabling bigtime as well to make sure the airflow in the case was clear too.
    And I also use a full tower case to give lots of room.

    Whatever the case, sure it will reduce the life of your PC.
    But if you're gonna overclock your system, you're probably doing it coz you play a lot of games and what selfrespecting gamer is gonna use the same system for more than a few years anyway?..:big grin:..
    And it will last more than a few years if you do your overclocking properly.
     

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