To buy, or not to buy... Help me out OT

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by ha\/0k, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. ha\/0k

    ha\/0k Resident Enginerd

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    Alright guys here's my dilemma... I'm a sophomore in college, and I'd really like to get a bike. I'll be co-opping for the spring and summer this year, so I should be able to afford one soon.

    The problem: The parents are totally against it for safety reasons. I'm very laid back - I'm not gonna do anything stupid, and they know that, they're worried about everyone else on the road. I understand their concern, but I go to school in a college town in the middle of nowhere, there's not a whole lot of traffic if you avoid happy hour, and plenty of windy backroads to learn on.

    I'm not looking for a 1000cc beast, I'd be taking the MSF, and I'd have the best gear. I've told them all of this. My dad simply sees it as a physics problem, big car + little bike = hospital. I understand there are risks, that's life.

    If I were completely on my own I'd be all over it, but I have to take into consideration that they really help me out a lot with school. If I went out and did it they wouldn't stop helping, but I'm not sure if I should pull that - I respect their opinion.

    Whatcha guys think? Do it? Don't do it? Why?? :)
     
  2. Original

    Original OT Supporter

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    Was just in your position, all I need is money :cool:

    I say, if you can afford it, do it! I'm sure your parents are much less worried about you making a mistake.. and more worried about the million cagers out there ready to run us over. Show your parents why you're responsible enough to ride! Most parents think the MSF is just something to teach us how to ride, but it's more about showing you what to do when bad situations come at you. They need to know that you're ready for anything coming your way.

    Learn to ride, buy the gear.. and get the bike! :wavey:

    It's not like you're out there on a Busa with a t-shirt and shorts :hs:
     
  3. cellphone

    cellphone Must not sleep.....

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    I say do it but get theft on your insurance policy

    and be safe I HATE riding through traffic/citystreets
     
  4. Dranian

    Dranian (..)

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    i had to convince my fiance and my family. my fiance was terrified of the idea of me getting a bike. it helps to show them that you are interested in safety and that you take riding very seriously. in my case i took the msf, started out on a 500 with full gear all the time and i also started doing alot of reading. if they see you reading a copy of "ride hard, ride smart", "how to ride a motorcycle", "total control" and "Sport Riding Techniques: How To Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety, and Confidence on the Street and Track" and things like that it might give the impression that you're taking it seriously and want to improve your skills and reduce the chances of a crash.

    also when they say they're worried about other drivers, try explaining that there are some basic attitudes that safe riders adopt and that if you follow certain principles of safe riding strategy, other drivers won't be a serious problem. One of these attitudes is "Everything that happens on the road is the motorcyclists fault". thats right, its not that asshole in the SUV who is talking on a cell phone, doing a crossword puzzle, eating fast food, yelling at their kids and shaving that causes a biker to crash, its the bikers fault for not anticipating that the driver was going to cut across 3 lanes of traffic without a signal and then slam on the brakes. if you believe that everything is your fault then you should also accept that you can prevent almost all crashes before they happen.

    a good rider always has an escape route planned and practices emergency avoidance procedures. braking, swerving, etc. you learn to ride to maximize visibility and the space around you and let other drivers see you, but you still act as if they dont see you. remain alert and constantly ask yourself "what if". what if a car pulls out of nowhere? what if this guy doesnt see me and changes lanes? could i avoid getting hit? what would i do if theres an unseen obstacle halfway through this turn? etc... when you do this, you'll have a plan for when the guy does pull out into traffic and stop, or a dog runs into the road, and you'll be ready to react before it creates a problem.

    practice S.E.E.-ing, even when you're in a steel cage yourself, to get good at it. S.E.E. is Search, Evaluate, Execute. That means constantly scanning/searching with your eyes, looking for anything or anybody who could do something stupid and cause a problem. Then the next step, evaluate, decide what is most likely to be a problem or what you need to react to first, and make a plan to deal with it. Finally execute your plan and avoid the situation...change lanes, slow down or speed up to get out of the way of whatever it is that's trying to kill you.

    if you actually make an effort to improve your control of the bike, by practicing safely off the roads on a regular basis and also study and practice a good riding strategy by reading, talking with other safe riders, and just acting responsible, then it should be very rare that you'll even come close to crashing and if you do, it will likely minimize the severity of the crash.

    I hope this helps and I hope you explain this to them and can convince them that motorcycles really arent as dangerous as they think if you ride smart and wear gear. you say you understand their concern, i was never really able to figure that concern out. i personally can't stand when people tell me they believe that i'm safe but that they worry about other drivers...i think they just don't know better.

    after you've had a bike for a while with no problems then they'll realize that motorcycles arent the death traps everybody seems to think. it can be hard to convince people of that beforehand though. best of luck to you.


    CLIFFS: big car + little bike + safe riding DOESNT = hospital
    if you know the risks and are willing to accept them and plan to ride responsibly and safely, then go for it. I hope your family will see reason.
     
  5. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    Wait until you're on your own.

    Reason why is highlighted above....it's a respect thing.
     
  6. Cachee0

    Cachee0 OT's Technical Recruiter, Send me your resume

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    MSF is a step in the right direction. When I lived at home I hid my bike at my friends house. They never knew and no issues.
     
  7. SBandit4

    SBandit4 If shit hits the fan, just make sure you have a go

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    Nothing is really stoping you from getting your license. However, you have pretty much all the time in the world to get a bike, so you can always just sit on your license and hold off until you are self reliant. With that said, I just parked the bike in the garage one day and over time my mom grew to accpt it. my dad, on the other hand, continues to nag me about selling it.
     
  8. ha\/0k

    ha\/0k Resident Enginerd

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    Yeah - this is really the only thing stopping me. If I could get any sign that they'd be alright with it I'd be all over it... Have to work on it a little bit more and see what I can do. I'm not gonna just buy it and not tell them :sad2:. If I get it they'll know.

    It really is everybody else that they worry about. I've got a really open relationship with my parents, and I'm hoping I can convince them to trust my judgment on this one. But we'll see....


    Hey thanks for all the input guys! :bigthumb:
     
  9. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    If they trust you and it's really everyone else they're worried about then they're NEVER going to come around. My mom asks me what I want for christmas every year, and every year I say all I want is a canoe. She says she refuses to buy me one because they're dangerous. She trusts me, she doesn't trust the canoe. Same with your parents...they trust you, they don't trust everything else about it.

    Honestly, if I was you I'd show respect for your parents and wait until after you graduate to get one.
     
  10. William Murderface

    William Murderface I'd rather die than go to heaven.

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    If you figure out a way to convince them, let me know. I've been riding dirtbikes for ten years but the parents still won't let me make the transition to street. It's hard not to respect their wishes when it's just coming from a genuine sense of concern.
     
  11. ha\/0k

    ha\/0k Resident Enginerd

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    Yeah I know... Big time...

    I think for now I just might take the MSF and get my liscense. Pick up a helmet and ride my friends' every once in a while. :hs:

    ..Countin down the days until financial independence... Haha..
     
  12. jtl090179

    jtl090179 Oh I get it, yeah. He's the girl, then you're the OT Supporter

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    that sounds like a good plan for now. show them you are more than responsible enough to ride.
     
  13. kdizzle59

    kdizzle59 New Member

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    yea definatly go get it if you want it...my parents didnt have much to say when i showed up and asked my dad to help me unload my new toy...he just looked at me as i walked by him with my leathers and helmet...but now he doesnt mind because he has seen how i try to be safe.
     
  14. shohan

    shohan New Member

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    Another idea to help ease their minds is to invite your dad or mom, or both, to take the MSF with you. It would show them what skills they teach as well as how as a rider you think differently then a driver of a car. This is one thing that I've really learned in the 6 months that I've been riding. I'd be driving down the road and notice how other cars react to a bike on the road. Some give extra distance while some don't even see the rider, and the safe riders anticipate things by changing lanes or speed.

    Good luck.
     
  15. jtl090179

    jtl090179 Oh I get it, yeah. He's the girl, then you're the OT Supporter

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    good advice
     
  16. murderer

    murderer ****** by ***** *********s

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    hm.....im 26 (too old to be here i know) got my own family even, and even my pops tells me time and again he doesn't approve. He rides a harley! But when it comes to bikes...take your time! Any fucker out there not paying attention to you <which is most of them> can take you out!
    Get it if thats what ya want. But know that when your on the bike look out for you above all else
     
  17. jtl090179

    jtl090179 Oh I get it, yeah. He's the girl, then you're the OT Supporter

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    how are you too old? im 27 :dunno:
     
  18. drumbandit

    drumbandit New Member

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    i didn't tell my parents until i had to bring it home to store it for the winter :o my mom was rather surprised

    good thread, and some good advice in here
     
  19. grizzy

    grizzy OT Supporter

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    I'll teach you next time you are in town or I come to OU to visit :wavey:
     
  20. AlcoLOLic

    AlcoLOLic New Member

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    ...and I'm 35. Full time student BTW. Otherwise it would be BYE BYE OT...no time for OT in a busy adults life that's for sure.
     
  21. FKY326

    FKY326 New Member

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    my parents were against me getting one when i was 18, but as my mom said
    "you're 18, you have to make your own decisions" my dad came with me to pick it up, test rode it since he use to ride before i was born... the next week i went with him to pick up his bike. :rofl:

    he's had 4 bikes since then and i'm on my 2nd. me and him didn't use to be that close before, but motorcycling has brought us together much more than anything we've done together before. we routinly take weekend and day trips together now.
     

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