A&P Tips on lighting?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by negative zero, Mar 7, 2006.

  1. negative zero

    negative zero New Member

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    Just curious what you all do for lighting when taking some pics.
    Is it true that using flash is bad and it's better to turn it off and use either natural light or other bright light sources?
    If natural light isn't available what kind of light do you use? Halogen, fluorescent, etc?
    If I wanted to set up a make shift "studio" for pictures of small things in my garage, what's the best way to do it?
    Sorry for the broad question. Thanks for any info.
     
  2. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    It all depends what you're shooting. Natural light is great but sometimes it's too harsh if it's high noon and there's not a cloud in the sky.

    Using a flash straight on (ie built-in flash) can lead to harsh lighting so bouncing it usually makes the shot better, but in areas with high or no ceilings, bouncing won't work.

    There are numerous sites with info on lighting so it's futile to go into any detail when resources are readily available. www.google.com or www.fredmiranda.com are good places to start. For what you're looking to use it for, probably 2 lightstands with 2 tungsten lights with a studio light tent would suffice. You can get a ghetto setup for ~ $200-300 for 2 lights, light stands, and a light tent.
     
  3. negative zero

    negative zero New Member

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    Thanks for the info. That first link is pretty much what I was thinking of Low. I just wanted a setup for smaller type objects but I don't want to put a lot of money into it.
    I was originally thinking of building a table and putting one or two of these lights near it to get some good light.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40123

    Just wasn't sure if there is a special type light that is best.
     

  4. Don't order that online if you do get it. Go to Kmart or Walmart they have the same exact Stanley lights for the same price and you don't have to pay shipping. :bigthumb:
     
  5. negative zero

    negative zero New Member

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    Oh, no I wouldn't order it. We have a HF locally. I was just showing an example. What I guess I need to know is if it's overkill? It's 500 watts. And is halogen OK or is there a better light source like flourescant or whatever?
     
  6. Tomash

    Tomash Active Member

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    I like natural lighting.
     
  7. Mr_Penut

    Mr_Penut Elitist Member OT Supporter

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    the natural lighting in my basement is outstanding:bowdown:
     
  8. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    Look for a gas discharge lamp. Metal halides have ~5000K colour temp, close to daylight. Also easier to get higher power levels and they operate cooler (halogens cook everything).

    Better yet, get a strobe & umbrella (for studio) or learn how to bounce a speedlight properly
     
  9. Mr_Penut

    Mr_Penut Elitist Member OT Supporter

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    let me get out my money tree.....
     
  10. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    He's got a sub! :wiggle:
     
  11. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Using flash is not bad at all if you use it properly. Read my EDU at the top of this forum about using flash.

    If you want to set up a small studio and you want to do it cheap, I would buy one good strobe (flash) and two smaller "slaves". You can get them pretty cheap. This will ensure that your color temps stay correct. You can get some pretty strange colors if you start mixing tungsten and halogen lights.

    Use white foamcore boards that you can pick up at an art supply store for about $8 for a 4'x8' sheet as reflectors and "bounce" your strobe light off of them for a nice soft look. They also work well to redirect sunlight and soften shadows. As previously mentioned, using silver or white umbrellas to bounce your light works well too.
     
  12. Shit man I made one of them light boxes and my pics are coming out looking like shit. I think I need to get brighter bulbs. I'm using those flourescent lightbulbs that are supposed to last a lifetime :dunno: I thought that'd be better and would make less heat so I wouldnt end up torching the white sheet :dunno:

    The pics are coming out really dull and all have a yellowish tint :hs: :wtc:


    [​IMG]
     
  13. Pineapple Devil

    Pineapple Devil beat it!

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    just by looking at that quote you should be able to solve your own problem
     
  14. negative zero

    negative zero New Member

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    Thanks. I'll take a look at the EDU. I just don't understand exactly what kind of light stobe or flash means?
     
  15. Mr_Penut

    Mr_Penut Elitist Member OT Supporter

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    as do I:bowdown:
     
  16. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    Actually if you go to the right hardware store metal halides in a housing designed as floodlights for gardens, carparks etc are very cheap.

    I bought a 400W metal halide bulb new for about $35 here, probably about $20 there. If you know electronics you will know that you need need an inductor & capacitor to wire it up, but if you buy the housing it should have all of that in it, may even come with a bulb.

    Also, they look mean :coolugh:
    [​IMG]
     
  17. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    Just remember to lay on the floor when taking photos :rofl:

    As for the yellow tint, make sure you get the 'cool white' flouros with as many Watts as possible. They are pretty close to 5000K mark, although not very bright. Daylight is around 5600K from memory so anything 5000-6000K (dischage or fluoro) works well with most cameras 'daylight'/'flash' setting.
     
  18. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  19. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    Tungsten / Incandescent lighting will definitely appear more yellowish than other lights.

    Fluorescent lights are generally terrible for color reproduction. Try shooting indoors in your average office complex with fluorescent overhead lights sometime and you'll see what I mean.
     
  20. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Strobe and flash mean the same thing, ie a small compact light that fires an extemely bright light at a very quick duration measured in the thousands of a second. It's the pop up "flash" light that you see built into cheaper cameras. I'ts also a light that professional photographers use for most of their work whether it's mounted on their camera on on a stand.

    TV lights on the other hand are lights that are continuously burning when in use.

    The real trick to getting good pictures with any kind of light is not necessarily the light itself but how and where you use it.
     
  21. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    :werd:

    light positioning and shaping is what counts
     
  22. Pineapple Devil

    Pineapple Devil beat it!

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    lighting is more important than the camera. you can always take a mental picture, but that lighting will not always be there

    remember that
     

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