A&P tips for taking pics in the snow?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by WiLL, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. WiLL

    WiLL Active Member

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    just as the title reads. thanks.

    im going to the snow soon and want to come back with some pictures. im probably going to get a small camera for that weekend, such as a canon s-series. will the pics come out ok if i leave it on auto mode? im not trying to get really great photos that im going to mount on the wall, but just regular group photos of me and my friends there.
     
  2. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Leaving your camera on auto can cause underexposed pictures because the camera will "read" all the white snow and try to compensate for it by selecting a smaller apreture. A good trick is to set your exposure by framing your ungloved hand in the shot and lock your exposure to this setting. Make sure that when you change locations, ie from sun to shade, or front light to backlight, you change your exposure again.
     
  3. daneford

    daneford New Member

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    One thing I learned: Since I have a digital camera, I can;t adjust the contrast when I take pics, so to make them look alot better, I crank up the contrast in photoshop to 10 or 15, it helps alot, other than that, dont let your cam get too cold or wet ;)
     
  4. Merli

    Merli gplus.to/merli OT Supporter

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    don't eat yellow snow.
     
  5. WiLL

    WiLL Active Member

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    thanks for the tip. what does "framing my ungloved hand" mean? is it just as it sounds? use my bare hands and create a "frame" then lock those settings...remove hand then snap pic?

    :)
     
  6. FryingPan

    FryingPan Certified Thread Killer

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    Try whitebalancing off the sky. I've heard that helps.
     
  7. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    framing your hand simply means that you look through your camera so that your bare hand fills most of the frame. Your camera "sees" your skin tone and sets an exposure based on your skin rather than white snow. Lock your exposure to this setting.

    Another method is to frame your shot and let the camera decide the exposure. Then open your lens one or two f/stops.

    White balancing off the sky is really not the best. You should try to white balance off of something white....hence the term "white balance"
     
  8. FryingPan

    FryingPan Certified Thread Killer

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    :doh: I meant lightmetering.

    I don't know why I got the two mixed up either. I assume it's a sunny day outside when you're taking the pictures, but sometimes the picture can be overpowered by the reflection off the white snow. Metering off of something that isn't as intense (the sky) helps tone the intensity down. I think. . .
     
  9. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Yes, you got it right. Taking a lightmeter reading off the sky is better than a reading off the snow. However, the sky is usually a bit darker than your skin. When in doubt about a reading, you should bracket your shots, ie shoot one shot a f/stop open from what your camera is reading, one shot "normal" and one shot a f/stop closed from normal. This works but it does use up film and your buddies may not wait around for you to fumble with your camera. Most cameras tend to "average" the exposure reading so it also helps to frame your shot with some snow, some sky, some friends, some trees, etc in the shot, then lock the reading in place, re-frame your shot and shoot away.
     
  10. FryingPan

    FryingPan Certified Thread Killer

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    I'll have to remember that the next time it snows in Florida :)
     

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