A&P tips for shooting in bright light

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by BoostedBoogie, May 11, 2004.

  1. my pictures (just a normal olympus c-4000 digital camera) always look too bright in broad daylight, no matter how much i mess with the settings. are there any suggestions to get better pictures and to avoid those super bright shots?
     
  2. nope ive browsed through the menu many times, especially camera settings and pic settings. haven't seen anything for sensitivity.
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Does your camera have adjustable shutter speed and aperature settings? The faster the shutter speed (i.e. 1/1000 sec is faster than 1/250 sec.) and the smaller the aperature (i.e. f/22 is smaller than f/16) the less light reaches your chip. You should be able to shoot any exterior shot, even in bright snow or sand, by simply using a faster shutter speed or smaller aperature.
     
  4. no adjustable speed/aperature settings (at least i dont think there are. there are preset settings for sun, cloud, night, etc. which could be the settings that change speed/aperature), but there are different ISO settings. there's 'auto', '100', '200' and '400'. tried all but it seems to give the same effect.
     
  5. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    The "sun" setting and the "100" setting should be the settings that you would use outside in bright sunlight. If you have the camera set to these and your photos are still too light, then I think your camera needs to be repaired. Double check the manual to make sure you actually have the camera set correctly.
     
  6. hm ok i think i'll try that.

    btw thanks guys for helping a newb out. i greatly appreciate it!
     
  7. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Glad to help.
     
  8. hm the photos seem to come out better, still a little bright but adjusting the levels and contrast in photoshop give better results than the other photos. i'll try to post some before and afters pics tonight.
     
  9. ok here are some before and afters, both default images and modified images.

    [​IMG]this image is the default camera settings.
    [​IMG]this image has iso settings to 100 under the 'outdoor' setting for the picture.

    and now for the modified. i simply used 'auto-levels' and adjusted the contrast in photoshop.
    [​IMG]default settings
    [​IMG]iso settings to 100 and 'outdoor' setting.
     
  10. nitro

    nitro Guest

    I suspect your camera is malfunctioning.
     
  11. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    I second that. All your shots seem to be taken at the same setting. Something is not right.
     
  12. Dnepr

    Dnepr Guest

    Can you manually set Aperture Size and Exposure?

    You see, I have a feeling your camera sets the exposure/aperture by the car and not by the background. There fore it overexposes the back ground, and not the car.

    I usually use 200 film, and 1/500s + f5.6stop on my camera in such bright light. Also, never good ideo to take photos if sun is shining on you.
     
  13. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    There is enought "bright exterior" in his photos that any TTL (thru the lens) metering system would compensate for the brightness and set the level correctly. I think that his camera is malfunctioning or there is some sort of setting that has locked the exposure value in place regardless of how he adjusts his camera.

    Also, why do you say that it's never a good idea to take photos if the sun is shining on you? Perhaps you meant to say that shooting car shots or portraits in direct sun doesn't produce the best results. On that I would agree, but there's nothing wrong with shooting in direct sun. Think of all the action shots you've seen that have been shot in direct sun.
     
  14. hmmm hopefully its not malfunctioning.

    aperature/exposure im pretty sure i can't change, unless im looking for the wrong setting. is there any other names for these settings that a digital camera might have used to make it more user-friendly?

    thanks again guys.
     
  15. i think it might be that. at the top of the lcd screen, it'll say f.28 or whatever and change from 400 to 100 everytime i move the camera around... then it'll do auto-focus and it seems like the aperature and exposure is automatic depending on what it's pointing at. now if i can find a manual setting to override the automatic, then that should solve my problem correct?
     
  16. well i did some shooting today. it seems that aperature and exposure is automatic and can't be adjusted manually.

    if i point at something bright, it'll go to about 120. if i go to something brighter, the number switches to around 80 and sometimes 50. something dark will go to 400 and completely black, it says 4" or something like that.

    hopefully this solves my problem. thanks a lot for everyone's help.
     
  17. bosox

    bosox *

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    if you have the c4000 you can shoot aperture or shutter priority or full manual. you should have a setting on the dial that says "a/s/m"
     
  18. ohhhh ok. i always wondered what that meant, never mentioned that in the manual. ill try that out
     
  19. ok so there are three settings. one is 'aperature priority', another is 'shutter priority', and the last is 'manual'. there are a few others called my mode and a number, but im guessing those are presets.
     
  20. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    A little photography lesson for you.

    Aperature priority setting means that you chose which f/stop (aperature) you want to shoot with and the camera will select the proper shutter speed for a correct exposure. Aperature priority is important when you want to control your depth of field. Depth of field can be best described as how sharp objects are that are outside of where you focused the lens. For example, if you are using a medium telephoto lens and you focus on a person ten feet away, at F/4 the distant background will be totally blurry. At f/22 (smaller aperature) the distant background will appear to be a lot more in focus.

    Shutter priority means that you chose the shutter speed you want to shoot at and the camera will pick the proper aperature for a correct exposure. Shutter priority is important when you are shooting moving objects and you want to "freeze" the action. In this case you would choose a shutter speed of 1/500 sec or faster. If, on the other hand, you want to pan the camera with your subject moving across the frame and blur the background, you might choose a shutter speed of 1/30 sec. A slower shutter speed is also necessary when you're shooting in low light situations or you want to shoot a time exposure (assuming your camera can do this feature)

    Manual setting is just what the name implies. You set both the shutter and aperature.

    It appears that your camera was locked in a manual mode on the above photos, otherwise you camera should have given you a correct exposure.

    Hope this helps.
     
  21. Dnepr

    Dnepr Guest

    I meant the sun or bright light shining into the lense.


    Nothing wrong with shooting on a sunny day, although i prefer small cloud cover.
     
  22. wow that was an informative read thanks.

    i will do some more experimenting with my camera.
     

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