A&P Tips for Fireworks?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by crxer, Dec 31, 2004.

  1. crxer

    crxer OT Supporter

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    Anyone have tips to take good pics of fireworks?
     
  2. XtremeSaturn

    XtremeSaturn New Member

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    Make sure you have a tripod. If you camera doesn't allow for any kind of manual adjustments you may be screwed. Set your camera for a 3-5" shot and if you have a remote release it'll help time things better while getting rid of any camera shake that would be caused by pressing the shutter release button. Try and have an apature of at least 11 to help get more of the burst in focus.
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    An aperature of f/11 is way too much and doesn't give you enough light.
    f/4 or f/5.6 is plenty and will give you more light and enough depth of field. Remember, the camera is not being focused on anything close, where DOF is a critical issue. Focus the lens on infinity, set the camera on a tripod and start with an exposrue of 1 second. Try shooing at various exposures up to about 5 seconds. Use film or digital settings of ISO 100.
     
  4. crxer

    crxer OT Supporter

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    Thanks guys, ill try it and post of some pics if i get any nice ones, i have manual settings its a sony f717
     
  5. XtremeSaturn

    XtremeSaturn New Member

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  6. crxer

    crxer OT Supporter

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  7. Kinks

    Kinks Sup. OT Supporter

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    I agree.. It depends on the situation, but you generally want to keep your shutter speeds around the 1-8 second mark. the smaller the aperture the less light you'll let in for each burst, which is good if you are blowing out the highlights and bad if you're not lighting them up enough. Normally f/5.6 to f/11 is a good place to start.
     
  8. Tomash

    Tomash Active Member

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  9. Tomash

    Tomash Active Member

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  10. XtremeSaturn

    XtremeSaturn New Member

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    Thanks...I thought they came out great myself. :)
     
  11. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Those pics turned out nice. You proved me wrong about the f/stop. What ISO were you shooing at? I'm guessing somewhere around 400 or higher if your lens was indeed set at f/11.
     
  12. XtremeSaturn

    XtremeSaturn New Member

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    I set it at f/11+ to make sure the burst were in focus and as sharp as I could get them with it being so dark out. The EXIF information is on the page with the picture...just scroll down.

    Here's an example from http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/8629502/
    Make: Canon
    Model: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL
    Shutter Speed: 6/1 second
    F Number: F/20.0
    Focal Length: 39 mm
    ISO Speed: 100
    Date Picture Taken: Jul 4, 2004, 9:25:11 PM

    The fireworks were about half a mile out from the shore. I was messing around New Years Eve and took a couple shots of myself and my wife with sparklers and long exposures. I found that the f/22 shot gave me what I was looking for rather than an f/4 shot. For example, the f/22 (20" TV) shot just showed the light trail from the sparkler while leaving myself or my wife out of the shot. The f/4 shot was only at 1" and showed the neighbors house, a blur of myself or my wife, and more blown out areas (obviously). I'll try and post some shots later of what I'm talking about.
     
  13. XtremeSaturn

    XtremeSaturn New Member

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    Oh, btw...the reason for crazy Shutter speeds was because I was sitting back in my chair with one hand on my beer and the other holding my remote shutter release and pressing it down for about 3-4 bursts and letting go. Thank god I had that thing too, it made life so much easier with not having to get up or having to wait for the camera's self timer to go off and miss most of the action.
     

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