A&P Thoughts on Teaching photography

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by aCab, Nov 26, 2008.

  1. aCab

    aCab New Member

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    I've been sitting around thinking about how to make some money on the side lately and got to thinking about how much advice I/We give here on OTAP.

    I thought into it further and realized how much I teach my friends/family about the technical side of digital photography (mostly how aperture, shutter speed, and ISO relate and the positive and negatives to changing each one).

    I'm going to be teaching a few brief weekend seminars at my College through the Art Department on basic strobist/OneLight style lighting :o for my photo credit next semester.

    I think I'm going to advertise a few small weekend seminars on how to use your DSLR (especially with the influx of people getting into the field and not knowing how to use a DSLR to their advantage).

    I figure if I can keep the price low ($20-40ish), that people will be willing to pay me to teach them to use their crap (kinda like driving lessons).

    What does OTAP think?

    oh, and before you ask, I love teaching. I teach swim lessons and guitar lessons and have a lot more patience than I probably should. I'm quite understanding IRL :mamoru: and would have loved to teach school as a Career path, it just doesn't pay enough. Maybe this is another way I can teach and still make some decent money...
     
  2. f/2.8L

    f/2.8L New Member

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    Go for it, what do you have to lose?
     
  3. Girth

    Girth ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ OT Supporter

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    do it :bigthumb:
     
  4. KrissyKrass

    KrissyKrass New Member

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    I think it's a great idea! Wish I had someone local teach me. I took photography up as a hobby and I'm starting to realize how bad I am at it. Out of 24 shots I may get 1-2 that are pretty good.

    Thought I could go off raw talent. lol, guess I don't have any. :p

    Could you recommend some books that might help me?
     
  5. f/2.8L

    f/2.8L New Member

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    Depending on the camera you have, I'd probably start with the owners manual.

    Srsly. Some of the DSLR owners manuals really cover the basics well. After that, there are numerous resources for that sort of thing. Check out the photography books offered through Amazon or NAPP.
     
  6. Climbing Cracker

    Climbing Cracker I am the Devil. And I am here to do the Devil's w

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    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_g...+digital+photography&x=0&y=0&sprefix=scott+ke
     
  7. Wheezer

    Wheezer OT Supporter

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  8. hurleyint1386

    hurleyint1386 Someone has sand in their vagina

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    Ansel Adams said that if he got 12 shots he liked in an entire year, then he was having a great year...
     
  9. Bloke

    Bloke Banned

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    did you read his book? :o
     
  10. the Rosswog

    the Rosswog OT Supporter

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    people expect you to be good at something if they are actually going to pay you to teach them
     
  11. redna

    redna New Member

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    I teach and do seminars all the time... it can be quite lucrative.

    The hardest part is figuring out where to price yourself. I've found that for seminars, you make more money if you price them higher and have less students.

    Then, I have "Intensive training sessions" and do the same, charge much more and focus on a lower amount of people.

    When I do regular "classes" I charge much less, and try and get as many people to get on board as i can.

    Then, my funnel goes like this:

    Teach class (as many people as I can get), very broad information.
    Tell them about the seminars i teach. I have quite a few on different "niches". So they only pay for the niches that they want (in your case, the lighting seminar).
    Then at the seminars pitch them on your intensive training classes (which cost the most) and are VERY focused on specific niches.


    So, in your case it could be:

    Class on how to use your digital SLR
    Seminar on Lighting in general, Natural Light
    Intensive training on One light lighting, Studio lighting, location lighting, etc.

    Classes are cheap, get people in the door. Seminars are more, and focus your audience. Intensive training is where the people that want to become experts in one area go... and they'll pay good money for expertise.


    Just don't teach something you know nothing about.
     
  12. Tonster MBA

    Tonster MBA OT'r of the Year 2013 OT Supporter

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    MR=MC

    find your profit maximizing point YO!
     
  13. MSIGuy

    MSIGuy om nom nom nom!

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    I taught adult ed computer classes during high school and it can be quite trying sometimes, but if it's something you really like, go for it.

    I taught photography at the elementary level for a while and it was a blast.
     

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