this may be a dumb question...

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by BrianNY, Jun 21, 2003.

  1. BrianNY

    BrianNY not a new member

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    my girlfriend is moving in, and we are setting up a network in the apartment. it will be wireless if that matters at all. i was just wondering if the two computer will have the same IP address, or different ones, i guess what i am asking is if the IP address is issued to the computer itself, or the connection to broadband we will be sharing. so will we have the same IP? or not?

    thanks all :bigthumb:
     
  2. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    No two computers can share the same IP address on the same network.

    With that in mind, its then a matter of figuring out where the two computers will get their IP addresses from. Although I haven't played with a wireless router, I'd think some of them would be capable of assigning IP addresses to your computer (using DHCP). Getting an IP address from your ISP is a possibility too, but they will probably charge you for it.

    You might do something like this:

    Internet -> cable/dsl modem/gadget -> wireless cable/dsl router -> hub (optional if your wireless router has enough ports for the computers) -> computers

    If you only want to network the two computers together, you could do:

    computer -> hub <- computer

    Or get a crossover cable and have:

    computer <-> computer

    But it sounds like you want both computers to have Internet access so the bottom 2 are out...

    If you don't have a DHCP server setup, you can manually specify the IP addresses for your PCs (typical cable/dsl routers can act as a DHCP server when properly configured). To make life easy, I'd recommend anything in the 192.168.x.y range (where x = [0-254], y = [0-254]). You will want X to be the same for all the computers on your network (X specifies the subnet). You will want Y to be unique for each computer you have (although you can select any number within range).

    Think of it like house addresses. If you and your neighbor live on the same street (or subnet), you can't have the same house address or the mailman gets really confused.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2003
  3. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Just replace the hub with a switch and you're golden.

    Hubs are obsolete. ;)
     
  4. rob

    rob Guest

    You will have different internal LAN IP's (192.168.0.x is the standard, with x being 1 for one computer, and 2 for another usually. 192.168.0.1, 192.168.0.2.. etc.)

    However, you will have the same external IP -- the IP the Internet recognizes and what you'd tell people should they ask.
     
  5. MP

    MP New Member

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    simply speaking you network will see it as two seperate IP's (192.168.1.1 & 192.168.1.2 <-- example) but the rest of the world outside will see them as the same public IP address.
     
  6. MP

    MP New Member

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    damnit...beat me to it
     

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