Thinking of Upgrading

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Skyline22GTR, May 31, 2006.

  1. Skyline22GTR

    Skyline22GTR OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Messages:
    9,081
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Orlando
    Here are my current specs bought back in 2002 at the start of college:

    2.4 Ghz Intel Processor
    Radeon 9700 Pro Graphics Card AGP (128 MB I believe)
    and I have 2 IDE harddrives totaling 100 Gb in storage. One of the hardrives is close to 6 years old as well and I plan on replacing it soon as well.
    512 Mb of Rambus Ram (PC800)


    I was thinking about updating it by getting a new Graphics card and maybe another 512 of ram. Have any suggestions on a graphics card or a place to get this ram? Also does it matter wether I get ECC ram or Non-ECC ram I am not sure what kind I have at the moment?

    This computer is a little old and needs a tune up. I want to build a completely new computer soon, but am waiting on the conroe chips from intel and various other things like windows vista and direct X 10 to come out before I build an entire new computer.

    Finally should I wait for these new things to come out or just bite the bullet. I have about 1600$ to throw towards a new desktop, but figured I would wait it out until the new processors and graphics cards came out. Is this wise?
     
  2. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    don't bother upgrading this one. You want PCI-E with conroe, so buying a video card now is worthless. Buying RDRAM is insanely expensive, and won't be worth shit when you build your new machine.

    Just wait to buy a new one.
     
  3. Skyline22GTR

    Skyline22GTR OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Messages:
    9,081
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Orlando
    when is the conroe chips supposed to be out
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
  5. codemartinet

    codemartinet lucky strikes

    Joined:
    May 25, 2006
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    the biggest bottleneck on a system like that is definately the RAM - you need at least a gig to do anything but run microsoft word and surf the internet for porn.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sell that RDRAM on eBay if you ditch the computer. 512MB, even of the slower speeds, can fetch a couple hundred nowadays. Lots of businesses have first-generation Pentium4 workstations that use RDRAM and they'd rather upgrade what they've got than replace it.
     
  7. Buck-O

    Buck-O Guest

    What everyone else said.

    AGP is on its way out now, and current, and last generation AGP cards are still fetching a premium as a result.

    And as everyone has said RDRAM is the way of the dodo as well. But definately sell it whenyou ditch it. As Deus said, it can still feth a few bones on eBay. So go for it.


    New computer for the win.
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's a pity Rambus and Intel got caught in bed together; RDRAM was kickass stuff, and still is, except nobody makes it for x86-combatible systems anymore. My father has an audio recording/mixing computer with 1.5GB if the fastest RDRAM ever made; that machine blows away computers two years newer than it. (jolly will be pleased to know I built that one using a P4 with an intel chipset.)
     
  9. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    sorry, but RDAM is shit. I would MUCH rather have DDR. There are technological reasons for this, but also legal reasons. Licensing RDRAM is a VERY expensive business. It is not only more expensive to manufacture, but you have to pay heavy royalties.

    Secondly, there are severe limitations to RDRAM. It's higher frequency was a REQUIREMENT to compete because it only operated on a 16-bit bus. So although it first appeared at 800MHz FSB, it could only move 16-bit per clock. Compared to DDR, which uses a 400MHz FSB, and can move 64-bit per clock.

    Heat was a HUGE issue for RDRAM. Essentially every stick had a heat spreader, not for looks, but because it needed it to stay running. Not a good thing.

    Let's not even get into latency issues. WORSE than DDR2. And DDR2 makes up for it's latency by keeping a 64-bit BUS and having an even HIGHER clock rate than RDRAM.

    As a comparison, RDRAM PC-800 operated at 800MHz, and thus gave 1600MB/s of bandwidth. DDR PC-266 (2100) provided 2100MB/s with it's 64-bit bus, despite a lower bus frequency, thanks to moving MORE data per cycle.

    Intel stepped things up a bit with their dual-channel chipsets, giving a maximum theoretical 3200MB/s transfer (good luck ever getting that) and then RDRAM PC-1066 gave a maximum DC throughput of 4200MB/s. However, DDR memory followed suite, and a similar-generation DDR chipset ALSO provides 4200MB/s (DC DDR-333 [2700]) but at a MUCH MUCH lower latency. RDRAM rolls in at about 45ns of latency, with DDR coming in at a stellar 7.5ns.

    Around this time RDRAM went out of the spotlight and DDR became popular with its DDR-400 (3200) specification, boasting a comfortable 6400MB/s -- a speed that RDRAM has yet to catch in a production personal computer system.
     
  10. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    In fact, Rambus has stopped their attempt to compete with DDR in the consumer PC market. They are now developing DDR memory controllers, and are working on XDR/XDR2, which is their hope to replace DDR2 in the future.
     
  11. codemartinet

    codemartinet lucky strikes

    Joined:
    May 25, 2006
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    you win the award for RAM expert of the year

    :bowdown:
     
  12. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    A good part of the reason why RDRAM is shit is because Rambus was forced to stop doing business with Intel, giving them little incentive to try to compete with DDRAM. Then, companies making DDRAM were basically free to learn all of Rambus' tricks and companies formerly making RDRAM could step sideways into improving their own DDRAM architectures.

    You say that every stick of RDRAM needing a heat spreader is a bad thing, but that's where DDRAM is now anyway, so it's a non-point.

    RDRAM, when the P4 first came out, was the only RAM that could top a 1GHz clock speed, making it the only RAM that could deliver data (even if only in small blocks) to the CPU at anywhere near the CPU's internal clock speed. True, a 16-bit bus isn't impressive, but at the same time being able to deliver new data to the CPU every two or three CPU clock cycles effectively eliminates the chances of the CPU going idle as a result of mis-caching the data it needs to do its job, making L2 cache as close to unnecessary as it can get these days.

    All technicalities aside, my father's RDRAM-equipped audio recording computer could boot up in 20 seconds when my mother's computer (with an identical CPU and hard drive, also an Intel chipset, and the same quantity of RAM, but DDR333 instead of RDR1066) took closer to 45 seconds to boot. The RAM was the only variable that was significantly altered.
     
  13. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    your anecdotal evidence is useless, and is no match for my cold-hard-facts.
     
  14. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Right. Because whitepapers are more useful than real-world experience.
     
  15. PC Principle

    PC Principle New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    Messages:
    64,143
    Likes Received:
    0
    Fucking :coold:

    I wish I had the knowledge you have.
     
  16. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    your real-world experience consisting of ONE machine that your FATHER owns?

    please. My facts come not only from white papers, but by actually TALKING to engineers at Intel. (I'm an Intel Technology Partner, and Premier Provider) And let us not forget the long time I've been in this industry, coupled with being involved with these issues on a daily basis with thousands of customers.

    Heck, I usually get shipped the "Intel Confidential" boards and processors, along with any new memory they're working with... Just so I can fuck around with them.

    But, I guess in your eyes all of this is nothing compared to the ONE machine that your FATHER owns. :mamoru:
     
  17. Soren

    Soren OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    37,553
    Likes Received:
    5
    I hear the S939 socket is being replaced with the S2 next year Q2. Is this true? I was thinking of upgrading for Vista (my comp is a bit slow) but figure I should wait until the next socket generation so I can freely upgrade later on without replacing my mobo.
     
  18. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    well, as things are going, now... You might want Intel Conroe. Everything points to it kicking AMD's ass for the near future.
     
  19. Soren

    Soren OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Messages:
    37,553
    Likes Received:
    5
    How long is the near future?
     
  20. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    for as long as AMD has released their roadmap... Thus far, AMD has already announced their "next big thing" and it doesn't look like it will hold a candle to Intel.
     
  21. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Considering you never mentioned to me where your experience came from before just now, no it didn't mean anything to me. Now that I have a frame of reference, it will probably make a difference in the way I interpret your posts henceforth.

    It might have been a good idea to mention this before, instead of waiting to toss it in my face.
     

Share This Page