Thinking about majoring in Computer Science...

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by lol wut, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. lol wut

    lol wut OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Messages:
    4,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    TX
    Alright, so I'm wondering if Computer Science is right for me. What should I be expecting? Also is there a lot of math involved? I suck at math.
     
  2. EkriirkE

    EkriirkE Zika Xenu OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Messages:
    14,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dublin & San Francisco, CA
    unless you are doing 3d programming, or designing programs with specific math functions, then the only math you will need is +-/* and a little %
     
  3. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    not true. I'm taking computer science, and it still requires basic level calculus, as well as discrete math (proofs, etc)

    There will be a hefty proof component as well for things such as computability. Not so much traditional math, but you'll still be expected to prove things.

    Computer Science is about 40% programming, 60% theory
     
  4. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Depends on your curriculum. I never once had to prove any mathematical concepts in any of my computing classes.
     
  5. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    22,743
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    yinzer / nilbog, trollhio
    programming is a hot field in my area...pretty much the only job you can get around here
     
  6. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    1,067
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ireland
    I was thinking about doing CS too but all the uni courses are for beginners i.e. first year in the least would be boring and frustrating (I know lots of ppl that have gone into these courses, and hate them).

    I'm thinking of doing business studies instead, doing lots of my own independent learning in computers as I've always done, and I want to start a software company or land a job managing somewhere tech-related, or somewhere not tech-related.

    I dunno if it is a better plan to go with CS the fuck........ There will certainly be jobs for it I think, and I have A LOT to learn but the drop out rate is huge (mostly people who begin to loathe computers studying them, or who chose the course because it's extremely easy to get into), but the jobs you land as a CS graduate are crap I gather?

    For the record I'm saying CS, the course says computer applications. http://www.dcu.ie/prospective/deginfo.php?classname=CA That's about as good as it gets in this country.

    Business is a 3 year course, is it usually a good plan to do business, and then can you do a masters in enterprise computing or something like that to land a job managing in somewhere tech-related?

    2 days to change my mind about studying business...
     
  7. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    you never had to prove whether something was possible to compute or not?
     
  8. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    my suggestion is go into whatever field you would be content to spend 1/3 of your life doing.
     
  9. Limp_Brisket

    Limp_Brisket New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    48,422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    i'm a senior getting my bachelors in computer science and as ameter said i've taken college algebra, trigonometry, calculus I, and calculus II as well as physics I and physics II for scientists and engineers and a discrete math class. so yes, there is math involved. this doesn't include any math you'll be doing in your computer related classes.

    i don't know if this is the same as all 4 year computer science degrees, but it's quite a bit of math. in fact i think if i took 1 more math class i could get a minor in mathematics.
     
  10. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    I believe I had to take three fewer math classes for comp sci than I did for physics
     
  11. Limp_Brisket

    Limp_Brisket New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    48,422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    oh i forgot to mention that i also had to take math 2040, a statistics class =/
     
  12. Limp_Brisket

    Limp_Brisket New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    48,422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    are you doing both?
     
  13. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    oh yea, i forgot about stats

    that course sucked balls. Our prof was evil on the exams (although she was a good teacher)
     
  14. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    I'm doing a triple major in Astrophysics, Physics and Computer Science

    intending a doctorate of Astrophysics

    all honours naturally. I have 35 courses left to take, and I plan to finish them in the next three years (for a total of 5 years).
     
  15. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    14,017
    Likes Received:
    0
    CS is good if you like to build things. Try an intro class and see if you like it. The math is a barrier, and its one I've always had problems with. To this day, I can't really describe algorithms mathematically. Its one you could get through if you really tried, though. And if you like building software, its worth doing.
     
  16. lol wut

    lol wut OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Messages:
    4,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    TX
    CS is just programming right? Once you get into the job field, you wouldn't need to use math? All you would do is use logic and write up algorithms and codes, no?
     
  17. skinjob

    skinjob Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2001
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Aztlán
    You most likely won't need specific knowledge math knowledge once you finish school. But, the whole point of learning math is to ingrain logical thinking habits and problem solving skills into your brain, rather than memorizing formulas and theorems. So, you actually will use the skills you acquire or strengthen by becoming good at math.
     
  18. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    14,017
    Likes Received:
    0
    Its not just programming. Its theory. And that theory is very mathematical.
     
  19. EkriirkE

    EkriirkE Zika Xenu OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Messages:
    14,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dublin & San Francisco, CA
    I've never had to do anything more than basic maths, aside from bit-wise/boolean math. The only time you will ever need to know anything more is if your program explicitly calls for such functionality, say a 3d engine, a tool to do said math calculations for you, or other oddity.

    Your general application is all about process and procedure... if, then, else, loop, input and output. and in such applications the hardest math implied may be division and subtraction to to proportional control/object positioning on a window resize if a UI is involved
     
  20. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    14,017
    Likes Received:
    0
    Most CS courses have a lot of math. It sounds like yours doesn't, EkiriirkE, but that is not representative.
     
  21. EkriirkE

    EkriirkE Zika Xenu OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Messages:
    14,799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dublin & San Francisco, CA
    Whoops, I never took CS... I was in the programming mindset :o
     
  22. ge0

    ge0 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Messages:
    8,398
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    JERSEY
    graduate with a Comp Sci degree, found a ton fo jobs easily.
     
  23. antiyou

    antiyou OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    25,295
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    in ur base
    Math classes I took to complete the CS requirements at my university:

    Calc I
    Calc II
    Linear Algebra
    Vector Geometry
    Multivariable Calculus (Calc III)
    Discrete Mathematics
    Differential Equations
    Probability and Statistics For Electrical and Computer Engineers
    Combinatorics and Graph Theory
    Numerical Methods and Analysis (optional I think)

    In addition many of the concepts in these courses appear in various CS theory courses as mentioned by others.
     
  24. Ameter

    Ameter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Messages:
    97,795
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    yeah, thats programming, not comp sci
     
  25. critter783

    critter783 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1,785
    Likes Received:
    0
    The university I went to required that CS majors also have either a minor or a double major. The way they laid the program out, you would get a math minor by completing the CS requirements, but it was only like another 5 or 6 classes to get the double major, so I did that.

    That said, I think CS is one of the best things you can major in. You get to learn a valuable trade skill, and you also get to learn the very science of sovling problems. Its just an awesome degree to pursue.
     

Share This Page