SRS therapy

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by DesignerAddic71, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. DesignerAddic71

    DesignerAddic71 RIP Luther Vandross 1951-2005

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    I saw the health counselor on campus because I have been feeling very down lately and she told me that I suffer from depression and anxiety. She set me up with a local therapist and I have my first appointment tomorrow. I've never been to therapy and I have no idea what to expect. I'm a bit nervous about it. I guess my question is what can I expect when I go?
     
  2. civicmon

    civicmon got all my game from the streets of california.

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    They'll ask why you're there first off, explain what you're doing, then they'll talk about how you feel, why you feel that way etc.

    It's easy to be nervous but they won't force you to talk about anything you're not comfortable to talk about at first, or ever.... they won't say 'you must explore this now' because that's against their rules and such.

    lemme know if you got more specific questions.
     
  3. dave steel

    dave steel My Kung Fu is the best.

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    This was a smart move. They will help you work through your issues. I think you will see it as a big help.

    http://www.campusblues.com/
     
  4. What can you expect:

    The core ethical principle in psychotherapy is this: The therapist's sole function in the relationship with a client is to perform psychotherapy. Therapist's silence, words, actions, inactions and policy exist solely to maintain the psychotherapeutic process.

    The best therapeutic course may not always be what feels good in the moment to either the client or the therapist.

    The therapist's decisions are not based on the patient's wishes or expectations, nor are they based on the therapist's feelings of discomfort when accused of coldness or selfishness. Nor are they based on the therapist's feelings of pleasure when praised by the client. Emotions inform, but do not determine therapist action.

    Once a therapist is educated, trained, tested and licensed, there are five essentials to psychotherapy: time and space, money, acceptance, confidentiality and role. Each has its challenges.

    Time contributes to the space boundary in which therapy occurs. The client needs to know her/his therapy solidly exists in space and time within appointment hours. As the client restructures time and priorities to keep appointments s/he develops increasing trust in self and the therapist. They both honor the time and space in which the therapy occurs. As that trust and honor increases, so does the intensity and value of the work. Plus, when the time and space boundaries are solid and reliable, the client is more able to bear stressful experiences outside of appointment times.

    Money is crucial in defining the relationship. The client pays the therapist an agreed fee. In exchange the therapist provides the complex service of psychotherapy. The client does not owe the therapist gratitude, referrals, gifts, contacts, advice, adoration, friendship or anything else. Paying for psychotherapy is the total sum of the client's obligation to the therapist. This frees the client to feel and express whatever is true in the moment, unburdened by any intangible debt. It also frees the therapist from any distracting sense of entitlement.

    Acceptance means no judgments. If the psychotherapist judges the patient, the possibility for understanding is diminished or voided.

    Confidentiality means the psychotherapist remains unshakably silent concerning all information revealed by the client. Clients need to be confident that their personal secrets, strong opinions about others, or sensitive emotional expressions, will not go beyond the relationship with their therapist.

    This creates the possibility for developing trust that is deserved. Only when confidentiality and trust are certain can the clients allow deeply surprising and previously unknown or unexpressed powerful thoughts to come to the surface to be explored and understood.

    Role definitions appear simple. One person is the client. One person is the psychotherapist. If the therapist leaves the role of therapist to interact with the client in another way, there is no therapy. The person who was in the therapist role has entered a different role leaving the role of therapist vacant.

    Whether the intentions are benevolent or exploitative matters not. If the therapist leaves the role of therapist the therapist has abandoned the client.

    Maintaining these boundaries are part of the continuing challenge to therapy and contribute to making therapy possible.

    Clients must, and continually do, challenge these boundaries. They will be with their therapists as they are with people in their lives. How could it be otherwise? Yet when the therapist responds as therapist (and not like everybody else in the client's life) the client can experience shock, rage, frustration, sorrow, insight, relief, learning and eventually fundamental change.

    The responsibility for remaining in role rests with the therapist. However, sometimes pressure from the client for the therapist to behave, speak or feel like a friend, parent, lover, teacher, child or advice-giver of some sort is so great that the therapist finds it extraordinarily difficult and even impossible to remain solidly in role.

    This is natural. Minor lapses, when recognizable, can actually be helpful to the therapeutic process as long as the lapse is indeed minor (anything more than a few moments is no longer minor) and recognized by the therapist. Then the lapse can be worked through with the client to increase understanding.

    When a psychotherapist honors professional ethics, he or she not only protects clients from exploitation but also creates an environment in which powerful healing can take place. The conscientious client focused on personal healing may be surprised and even angry at the ethically determined structure he meets in psychotherapy. However, the client quickly grows to realize that this structure is essential to bring about his healing and allow him a life of more freedom and joy.

    Source

    (1)SelfHelpMagazine.Com - WHAT'S ETHICAL IN PSYCHOTHERAPY AND WHAT'S NOT by Joanna Poppink, M.F.C.C.
     
  5. I am not a trained psychotherapist, but even when providing members insights I abide absolutely, and without question - to the ethics established in this article. Since I have no degree of any kind, and since I don't know everything there is to know in the field - I obviously don't charge people for what little good I can offer, but I do have my personal experience, and a lot of therapy myself which helps me more easily reflect the course that some people require.

    This article will help you understand what to expect from a competent therapist.
     
  6. jeyur

    jeyur cum fairy OT Supporter

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    i want to see a psychiatrist...maybe he/she can explain why i do what i do...
     
  7. You mean Psychologist or Psychotherapist [Social Worker trained in psycho therapy]. Psychiatrists usually handle the biological portion of therapy [i.e. monitoring medicine, working with a psychotherapist to adjust and change routines, or stabilize routines etc.] - not the behavioral, or psychoanalytical portion. There are "some" who perform other therapies, but most do not.
     
  8. jeyur

    jeyur cum fairy OT Supporter

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    my mistake MB. thank you. i meant psychologist
     
  9. The information I posted above would apply to you then. If you're curious about what to expect when/if you choose to see a therapist, then you may find it useful.
     
  10. DesignerAddic71

    DesignerAddic71 RIP Luther Vandross 1951-2005

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    thanks guys for all your help. hopefully i can get these issues under control before they completely take over my life. it is very comforting to know i have you all to turn to.
     
  11. kostiw

    kostiw Long Live The Emperor!

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    after seeing a few differnt ones i havent seen them help me much besides perscribing me some drug. there only really good for releasing some steam and givng some advice. but still they are a good thing
     
  12. That's a Psychiatrist, not a Psychotherapist. I covered this above. You may find it to be useful information.
     

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