GUN The law!

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Navvik, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    I found myself wondering, are there any law enforcement types within WMD? if so whats it like? I've recently starting considering an position with the local law enforcement here but I'm not sure if its the money i saw or the fact to make a difference legally.
     
  2. Katsumoto

    Katsumoto New Member

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    The variety is what attracted me, different stuff everyday. Boring some days, exciting other days. And despite what many people say, I think it's an honorable job. The 20 year retirement is also a big plus.
     
  3. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    Im looking at application requirements and everything and it doesnt seem... overly difficult. But it apprears that the dept. isnt hiring. would school or anything help with that? or should i secretly put a cap into an officer?:mamoru: are there any tips you could give to a prospectee?
     
  4. Katsumoto

    Katsumoto New Member

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    I don't know how it is where you are, but here it's quite competetive and difficult getting a start in LE. If you're young and have done dumb things, as most young guys do, then they will want to see some time in between. Of course things like holding a steady job, not a lot of tickets/drugs/alcohol, and be in decent shape for the fitness tests. I would recommend checking to see if any of the departments around you have a reserve force. It's just part time volunteer, but you get to see everything involved, get experience, and see if it's really for you. That will also give you a lot better chance getting hired full time.

    Kind of sucks waiting for openings, smaller departments sometimes take a while, then you have lots of people applying for one spot.

    Have you ever done a ride-along?
     
  5. PanzerAce

    PanzerAce Active Member

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    Paging GarandBobcat
     
  6. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

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    Okay, I'll be starting as a Reserve deputy with my county's Sheriff Department pretty soon, but I got really lucky in the hiring process--26 folks showed up for the PT test and Oral Board interviews, rumor has it that only 5 are actually getting hired.

    However, I can offer a couple pointers that keep getting passed along to me:

    If you can get a ride-along or several with the agency you're looking at, do it. I haven't done that, and I keep feeling like that's going to bite me somewhere along the line.

    Look into "extra help" jobs associated with the agency--the SO here has the contract for courthouse security, so the unarmed court security guards (well, they just got Tasers from what I hear) are generally people who are either retired and want something to do, or people who are looking to get hired by the Sheriff and are working extra help to become known by the department.

    If your local community college has Reserve classes, maybe give that a try. I know that in CA, the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training allows some community colleges to run partial Reserve Academies. Check with your state POST and see if there's something like that where you live. Some agencies like having reserves, because they don't have to pay as much, or provide benefits and retirement, but pretty often, an agency will look to its reserves if they're hiring for full-time jobs.
    Some places even pay their reserves a little bit (my local SO, I think, offers about $10-$15/hour), and at least in CA, when you're on duty, you have all the powers of a normal full-time officer. Off-duty is a little different, depending on your state and agency. Some will give permission for, say, off-duty carry, some won't, that sort of thing.

    If you really want to get into the field those are a couple places to look.

    And if you know any officers/deputies, hit them up with some questions. Good recommendations from other LE types can carry weight in applications, more so than other references, but again it depends on the agency and the background investigator.
     
  7. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

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    To add to my above, though, remember that like Shenaniguns says, LE can be pretty crazy. Anything can (and eventually probably will) happen.

    Fights, chases, getting swung at, possibly even getting shot at, having to deal with some of the scum of the earth at times...it can and probably will happen. And you may have to kill somebody in the line of duty. It happens, along with car crashes, dealing with drunks and stoners, tweakers, crack-whores.

    Sure, especially in more rural areas, there will be boring times, but those get punctuated periodically with moments of insanity, excitement, terror...you name it.

    Talk to some officers or deputies, get a few ride-alongs under your belt, get a feel for what getting into the profession entails, and whether you'd enjoy it.
    And if you do get into it, it'll probably change your life.

    Good luck!
     
  8. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    How does one get ride alongs? right now i'm a desk jockey at 3m (contracted employee) and i... detest my job. the area i live and work in has gone downhill since i moved there. and... honeslty i want to clean it up, legally.
    and as far as the lifestyle thing, i'm not particularly attached to anyone here. just a few friends. back in NJ i lived in a dangerous area and faced danger daily. Also my parents did a good job of raising me i.e. not parking me in front of violent movies to raise me so i've never had a single run in with the law.
     
  9. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

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    Call up the agency, or if you can, go over to their main station/office and ask. Some places might have forms you'll need to fill out (liability etc) ahead of time, or might have you make an appointment with a supervisor to get you scheduled in with one of the officers.
     
  10. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

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    This too.

    Cops have a high divorce rate, but it's not so bad when you get together and she (I'm assuming) already knows you have that going on, and will be aware of the crazy schedules, staying late to finish reports, or to investigate something, getting called to cover other shifts, working days, nights, and swings, the stress you'll get at work and the need to decompress, the fact that you can't just talk about everything because it's a different world sometimes, all that.
     
  11. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    I dont think i'd be worried about that. i left a girl in nj who said she was pregnant with my kid, but the lil fucker came out white as snow and i happen to be black. but yeah when next i get seriously involved if i do become an officer they'll know the tale of the tape so to speak.
     
  12. ShackleMeNot

    ShackleMeNot MINDSET

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    If you don't start while you are younger, you probably won't.

    Get a few years in local LE to see if it is for you and then look at applying to some of the Federal agencies. I have friends that work at all levels of LE and the ones that work for the major Fed LE agencies seem more content and better paid that the local cops I know.
     
  13. mattsb2000

    mattsb2000 OT Supporter

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    Good luck with whatever you decide to do. Being a cop takes balls IMO.

    :wavey:
     
  14. WooleyBooger

    WooleyBooger OT Supporter

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    I should be starting the academy in about a month. This go round they ran two lists (separate tests and everything), got about 30 on the first...and 30-40 on the second. I heard the other day they've got 3 left that are still eligible.
     
  15. Ford4Life

    Ford4Life Guest

    My uncle works for the DEA, he worked as a county sheriff for 15 years on the narcotics squad before that. It's very hard on family if you are married or have a girlfriend. Strange hours, and the emotional drain it can take on you pretty difficult. My uncle said he still remembers the first person he saw die, the first child he saw die, etc. It very much is a lifestyle. It's even worse now that he's a Fed, he travels all over the US constantly. He moved into a new house, and 4 years later his boxes still aren't unpacked because he's never home long enough.

    If you have any criminal history, other than speeding tickets, it's going to be pretty hard to get in. Many of the federal agencies require a 4 year degree in something also. I came very close to doing it, and it's still one of my regrets that I never did. It might not being the highest paying job in the world, but I think it's pretty rewarding.
     
  16. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    Sounds stiff, i might have to step up my game so to speak, i wonder what they look for more, a head for the law? or muscle to enforce it? i think generally they want both, the muscle to enforce and the brain to know when to use the muscle. Ive also been thinking of possibly increasing my chances with some form of schooling. was thinking something related to criminology or psych.
     
  17. Ford4Life

    Ford4Life Guest

    To be a beat cop you need more common sense than anything. My uncle always said there was 4 things you needed to know. People, places, things they do, and times they do them. If something looks out of place, it probably is.
     
  18. Katsumoto

    Katsumoto New Member

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    Agreed, that will serve you much more than a criminal justice degree. School is still good, and is required for some departments.
    Most of it is decision making, you go into a lot of situations you haven't encountered before and may need to act fast. People look to you to make a decision.
     
  19. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    I was doing some reading and i saw something about a lie detector, what are the types of things they ask you?
     
  20. Ford4Life

    Ford4Life Guest

    A lot of questions about the pages and pages of questions you have to answer.
     
  21. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    nothing like have you ever touched your cousin that time in the barn when you were 12? what about illegal drugs, does that automatically disqualify you?:mamoru:
     
  22. Ford4Life

    Ford4Life Guest

    Depends on the dept, but in most cases yes. And you will be asked about any illegal drug use.
     
  23. WooleyBooger

    WooleyBooger OT Supporter

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    Actually my dept. does ask about sexual behavior, on the personal history, and psych. Also ANY hard drugs EVER is an automatic out. Weed is ok as long as it hasn't been in the last 5 years or so. And they WILL test you on it with the polygraph.
     
  24. Katsumoto

    Katsumoto New Member

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    Various questions, but they go over them with you before taking it. The most important thing about the poly is not changing your story from whatever you previously divulged, in which you might as well of just told the truth.

    Drugs depend a lot on the type, the frequency, and how long ago it was. I have a friend that had used LSD and was still hired. It was when he was super young and only once though. Lots of people have smoked weed, but it had better be a good while ago and not an every day thing. Some drugs are automatic disqualifiers.
     
  25. Navvik

    Navvik Active Member

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    Yeah marijuana got its hooks on me a couple years back but i've since kicked the habit. it wont show up on the test its was so long ago but if they ask have i ever gotten high and i say yes i'm just worried it'll count against me no matter how long ago it was. Ive never even smoked cigarettes. just a little weed. in retrospect probably a bad idea. but still if asked ( i'm sure i will be) i'll be honest and face the music
     

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