A&P Taking pictures of reflective objects?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by BitchThatEatsOnions, Nov 12, 2007.

  1. BitchThatEatsOnions

    BitchThatEatsOnions New Member

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    I need to photograph a lot of granite slabs straight on to use as textures in a house remodel that I am working on. All of the slabs are polished and because they have to be taken straight on, how can I prevent myself from being photographed. I thought that maybe I could make a temporary wall that would have matte black fabric stretched over it and then just cut a hole big enough for the camera lens to get through...that way I could just photoshop out a very small reflection...

    There are a lot to do so editing myself out of every pic is not an option. The slabs are ~5x10 feet.

    Thank you for your help.
     
  2. Dwight Schrute

    Dwight Schrute New Member

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    use a polarizing filter
     
  3. BitchThatEatsOnions

    BitchThatEatsOnions New Member

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    I have tried a polorizing filter, however it doesn't block all of the reflections no matter what angle it is turned to.
     
  4. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    You could try renting a tilt shift lens.

    If your light is comming from the side, you shouldn't see much of your reflection if any in the granite.
     
  5. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    telephoto lens
     
  6. skolen

    skolen Guest

    .

    Or stand back.
     
  7. Jonny Chimpo

    Jonny Chimpo OT Supporter

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    CPL's only work at 90 degrees from the light source, so more than likely the light that the granite was under was at the wrong angle for the CPL to be really effective. Either you can move, you can move the granite, or you can move the light.

    Another trick is to setup the camera on a tripod and shoot multiple exposures while rotating the CPL between each shot to polarize a different portion of the light falling on the subject. Then open all of the images as layers in Photoshop and simply use mask tools to take out unwanted reflections.
     

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