Studying computer science

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Gli, Jan 9, 2007.

  1. Gli

    Gli i can has fast duck?

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    What are some basics / guidelines one should know fairly well before heading off to college to study computer science?

    Everyone tells me I'm "omfg 1337 lololol" but I don't want to be the fucking noob that doesn't know ____.

    :hsd:

    List ~10 things I should know. (just guidelines duhr)
     
  2. Doneranator

    Doneranator New Member

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    Knowing pointers and recursion will help a lot, in stepping through the logic of programming.
     
  3. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    Find out what language is central to your degree. Mine is C++ but I've heard of other programs that make Java central. Whatever the language, get a book and start learning it...that will help get you started. Brush up on your math skills also.

    I'm graduating in May from a program that will be ABET acredited soon with a 3.9 GPA. You'll learn the things you need to know while in your degree but you should watch out because there are many ways to screw yourself.....like not taking classes seriously, ditching, sleeping through lectures, turning assignments in late and generally being lazy. CS is not an easy degree and don't listen to the people that will tell you that you won't ever use this information after you graduate...so why study. These people are like cancer and should be avoided at all costs.

    Even if it's a freshman or sophmore level class, take it seriously and do all the homework. I see many students take these classes lightly and don't fully master them....they seem to run into very difficult challenges later in their degree.....some just disappear all together. The best way to ensure that you don't end up like one of these people is to study very hard right from the start! Degrees build on themselves....so jr and sr level classes will expect that you have mastered the lower level stuff and they will not review it for you. I've actually heard students that didn't know how to write a simple for loop (something you learn in programming 1) and they are seniors. I don't know these people personally but others do and they assure me....it's not just a rumor.

    You should also try to identify the serious students and befriend them. It's not so they will do your homework for you....it's so you can help each other when the going gets rough....and it will get very rough indeed. Part of the reason degrees have value is because they are difficult to get. A friend or two that are dedicated to their studies will help you more than you know.

    Don't let anyone ever convince you that grades don't matter. They DO matter! Afterall, when you are graduating you'll need to seperate yourself from all the other graduates...one way to do this is by getting stellar grades. Even if you don't like a subject, force yourself to study it in depth...learning to do this is very important to your development.

    And no matter what.....don't give up. Bomb a test?? Change what you are doing...study more...work harder and don't ever quit! Keep fighting for the best grades you can and before you know it, you'll be about to graduate and shocked that it went by so quickly.
     
  4. Gli

    Gli i can has fast duck?

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    So basically learn C as much as I can?

    <3 long reply...inspiring. :)
     
  5. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    Actually, I wouldn't worry about "pre" learning anything...you'll pick it up as you go. In fact, prelearning might make you "think" you already know a topic when you don't. I've found myself daydreaming in class for this very reason then I got owned on the test cuz I "thought" I knew the topic. IMO, it's best to go in cold and learn as you go.
     
  6. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Nice work, Cootie. :cool:
     
  7. Gli

    Gli i can has fast duck?

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    :hsugh:

    What do you consider "cold" though?

    I got halfway through the CCNA prep-class at my school but then they dropped the class...........:wtc:

    But have never really picked up much programmming......I think I'll just start working on Java and then some C, as I know I will not be slacking off in college because I need to get the sophmore/junior internships :x:

    *edit*
    Or is it like majoring in Business where no one knows shit about business? :ugh: My guess is not because random people don't sign up for things like art, comp. E, comp. S, etc.
     
  8. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    Also, your school may offer an emphasis program. Find out what you like most about computing. For example, I for one enjoy networking and will be graduating in May with a B.S. in Computer Information Systems with an emphasis in Networking and Telecom. Other emphasis areas that were offered were software development, computer aided drafting and art, etc. Your school may offer more or less.
     
  9. Gli

    Gli i can has fast duck?

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    Yeah they have a few different programs you can enter into. Theres a general, graphic design, and one other.....I also like networking and know more than the average person about it so I may try to head down that route as I dont find programming to be as "fun" as learning about networks and what not.
     
  10. Gli

    Gli i can has fast duck?

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  11. YodaHart

    YodaHart New Member

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    Start reading this book and you'll be golden
    http://www.amazon.com/Problem-Solving-C%2B%2B-Object-Programming/dp/0321268652/sr=8-3/qid=1168394070/ref=pd_bbs_3/103-1471032-5283851?ie=UTF8&s=books

    This is the first book I read in college in my CS1 course. I've read it a couple more times just to refresh my memory on C++.

    You'll also need some good basic math skills. You won't need much or any Calculus, but know matrices and how to solve polynomial equations.

    There are tons of books you can read, but I wouldn't recommend a "for dummies" book. They usually don't tell you everything you need to know. The college should require you to take some kind of programming language course your first semester which will help a lot. It's usually a C language course.
     
  12. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    Well, ohnowai won't be replying for a while...he posted unlinked Goatse in the main forum.
    :Owned:
     
  13. EvanD

    EvanD Active Member

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    DOT

    very well said :bowdown:
     
  14. kronik85

    kronik85 New Member

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    i wrote this just in case you ever make it back to this thread after your ban. i'm a computer engineer and one of the more pleasurable things for me was crunch time before exams.

    my friends and i would sit around for about 5 hours and basically just talk about whatever was going to be on the test. if someone didn't understand a concept, there were 3 or 4 other people there who understood it, had to learn it, and could probably dumb down the technology into words you can understand.

    i had so many "aha!" moments those nights, it was fun.


    coottie put it very well, even if he is a sooner :squint:
     
  15. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    Thanks!
     
  16. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    Well, I actually contradicted myself in this thread but left it in for shitz n giggles. When I say cold, I mean you could have an understanding of basic C and C++ constructs (how to declare variables, functions, loops...just basic stuff) but there's no reason to spend much time on this because you'll have lectures covering it and reading and programming assignments to go along with the lectures.

    CCNA is differnet than programming. It's about how to use Cisco's hardware. They prolly have some things in common but it doesn't really matter....your professors will tell you what they expect and hopefully will teach you the important subjects.

    A CS degree is nothing like a business degree. CS is very technical in nature and requires a high degree of precision. Business (not including accounting)is much more theoretical and subject to intrepretation. You should expect to know EXACTLY what a particular piece of code will do. If not, then you need to find out.

    Programs don't write themselves and there is not some magical being floating around taht will debug your programs. YOU will have to do all that yourself and the best way to get good at it is to screw up and spend time debugging. You should therefore try to finish your programs 1 to 2 days before they are due....so if you run into problems you will have enough time to debug them.
     

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