stuck coming out of the hole

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by giblit, Mar 11, 2005.

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  1. giblit

    giblit OT Supporter

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    lately ive been doing christophers routine that he posted about building a base and im stuck coming out of the hole, since ive had mono i lost a lot and im trying to gain it all back. my problem is when i squat is that i get stuck down at the bottom and once i just move like 4 inches i shoot up like a rocket and i know i dont want to do that and im just wondering how i increase my lower end.
     
  2. UncleJohn

    UncleJohn "That guy"

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    just keep doing what your doing, its normal when you first start squating
     
  3. UncleJohn

    UncleJohn "That guy"

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    and any by the way the title of this thread made me giggle
     
  4. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Getting smashed at the bottom: There are many things that can cause this to happen. The first and most apparent problem is it was just too much weight. I know many of you are thinking, "Well, no crap!" but you'd be shocked at some of the e-mails and calls I get.

    For example, I had one guy call because he got crushed with a 315 bench and couldn't figure out why. I later find out he barely made 275! It was simply too heavy for him!

    This could also be improper set up from the start. If you don't start with a good arch and tight abs and then don't sit back, you'll sit straight down. You have to sit back into the squat to get the most out of your hamstrings, lower back, and hips. If you sit straight down you're forcing most of the weight onto the quads and allowing the bar to actually travel forward.

    The third reason could be you're not forcing your knees out on the way down and keeping them forced out of the hole. This could be fixed with a simple verbal queue like "Knees out!" You may also need to do more hip work. Some great things for this are seated abductions with bands around the knees. We call them "knee-outs with the band." A second thing that'll help with this is wide stance low box squats with light weight and higher reps (around ten). Squat to the bottom position and then only raise half to one-forth of the way up, then go back down. This will keep the tension in the range of motion you're having your problem with.

    A fourth reason you may miss in the hole is you're letting your chest drop on the way down. A fifth reason is that your hamstrings aren't strong enough to sit back on. I see this one all the time in the seminars we conduct. What happens is the lifter will sit back so far and then just drop. The strength is just not there to keep sitting back. To fix this, use a box height on speed day that you can sit back on and keep good form. Who cares if it's four inches high? Just do it! Then, over the next few weeks, lower the box half to one inch each week, but keep the form 100% correct.

    You can also strengthen the hamstrings with glute ham raises, reverse hypers, good mornings, pull-throughs, and many other movements. This could be due to weak abs and lower back muscles. This is another reason why we all need more ab and back work.
     
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